Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

If you use the --verbose 11 flag, you'll get a far more detailed explanation of the error. In this case, the error you get is looks like this: Two-argument "open" used at line 6, near 'open FILE, 'somefile';'. InputOutput::ProhibitTwoArgOpen (Severity: 5) The three-argument form of `open' (introduced in Perl 5.6) prevents subtle bugs that occur ...


19

From http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=685452 You use die when the error is something you or your code didn't do right. You use croak when it's something your caller isn't doing right. die "error: $!" indicates the error is on the line where the error occured. croak "error: $!" indicates the error is on the line where the caller called your code. In ...


17

I think this should work for you (if I understood what you want): package Perl::Critic::Policy::CodeLayout::NoSideComments; use strict; use warnings; use Readonly; use Perl::Critic::Utils qw{ :severities :classification :ppi }; use parent 'Perl::Critic::Policy'; our $VERSION = 20090904; Readonly::Scalar my $DESC => "side comments are not allowed"; ...


15

Have you seen Perl::Critic::Moose?


12

There is an open source program called Splint: Splint is a tool for statically checking C programs for security vulnerabilities and coding mistakes. With minimal effort, Splint can be used as a better lint. If additional effort is invested adding annotations to programs, Splint can perform stronger checking than can be done by any standard lint.


11

In terms of setting up a profile, have you tried perlcritic --profile-proto? This will emit to stdout all of your installed policies with all their options with descriptions of both, including their default values, in perlcriticrc format. Save and edit to match what you want. Whenever you upgrade Perl::Critic, you may want to run this command again and do ...


11

If I remember correctly, that's what lint does.


10

Both of your greps are modifying $_ because you're using s//. For example, this: grep {s/(^|\D)0+(\d)/$1$2/g,1} is the same as this: grep { $_ =~ s/(^|\D)0+(\d)/$1$2/g; 1 } I think you'd be better off using map as you are not filtering anything with your greps, you're just using grep as an iterator: sub natural_sort { my $t; return map { ($t = ...


9

Make the Perl Critic happy, and make yourself even happier, by creating a subroutine, and calling it with each line of the file. use strict; use warnings; sub do_something { my ($line) = @_; # do something with $line } open my $fh, '<', \$multiline_string or die "Cannot open scalar for reading: $!"; while(<$fh>) { chomp; ...


9

Well, I really don't think you should waste vertical screen real estate on this. On the other hand, if I were to write this pattern over several lines, I would have used braces and indented the pattern: if ($line =~ m{ \A \s* package \s+ (\S+) \s* ; }x ) { IMHO, the following version is perfectly fine: if ( ...


9

The simple answer is that Perl::Critic is not following PBP here. The book explicitly states that the shift idiom is not only acceptable, but is actually preferred in some cases.


9

Perl::Critic at times will concern itself more with being an accurate reproduction of PBP than presenting good policy, and some of Perl Best Practices hasn't aged well. For example, the now woefully out of date Miscellanea::RequireRcsKeywords is still on by default. Perl::Critic's policies shouldn't be treated as canon. They lack the ability to do ...


9

There isn't anything in Perl::Critic at present to provide what you need, but it's quite possible add a policy to do something like it. Unfortunately PPI isn't comprehensive enought to identify properly what each token in the program is doing, so it takes more coding than it might. This program checks for a use File::Temp statement that tries to import ...


9

Using B::Deparse, you can detect unreachable code in some situations: perl -MO=Deparse -e 'if (0 && $x) {print 1} else {print 2}' do { print 2 }; -e syntax OK It's not so easy if the 0 is not the first condition, though: perl -MO=Deparse -e 'if ($x && 0) {print 1} else {print 2}' if ($x and 0) { print 1; } else { print 2; } -e ...


8

Never write a comment that says what the code says. Comments should tell you why the code says what it says. Take a look at this monstrosity, without the comments it is very difficult to see what is going on, but the comments make it clear what is trying to be matched: require 5.010; my $sep = qr{ [/.-] }x; #allowed separators my ...


8

See this section in the Perl::Critic man page. Until I discovered this note, I lived happily in the delusion that my code was good enough to pass Perl::Critic. And then I installed criticism only to discover the truth :) You need to add the line use criticism 'gentle'; at the top of your code. Change gentle to brutal if that suits you. Running the script or ...


8

Running perlcritic with --verbose 11 explains the policies. It doesn't look like either of these explanations applies to you, though. Always unpack @_ first at line 1, near 'sub xxx{ my $aaa= shift; my ($bbb,$ccc) = @_;}'. Subroutines::RequireArgUnpacking (Severity: 4) Subroutines that use `@_' directly instead of unpacking the arguments to ...


8

This critic is what is called a false positive. There's no need or reason for /x here. If you try to silence every critic, you'll end up with weird code. That said, the critic was recommending s/(.)/sprintf("%x",ord($1))/exg Furthermore, it probably makes no sense to avoid converting newlines. If so, you want to use /s too. ...


8

You can't do it because Perl doesn't see if functions exist until runtime. It can't. Consider a function that only gets evaled into existence: eval 'sub foo { return $_[0]+1 }'; That line of code will create a subroutine at runtime. Or consider that Perl can use symbolic references my $func = 'func'; $func = "no_such_" . $func; &$func; In that ...


8

The advice on that page is awful. IPC::Open3 is a low-level module that's hard to use. The very code the page suggests will hang (deadlock) if lots is sent to STDERR. Use IPC::Run3 or IPC::Run instead. Examples: run3 $cmd, undef, \my $out, \my $err; run3 [ $prog, @args ], undef, \my $out, \my $err; run3 [ $prog, @args ], undef, \my @out, \my @err;


7

It's important to remember that a lot of the stuff in Perl Best Practices is just one guy's opinion on what looks the best or is the easiest to work with, and it doesn't matter if you do it another way. Damian says as much in the introductory text to the book. That's not to say it's all like that -- there are many things in there that are absolutely ...


7

I found this bug in version 1.105, it is gone in version 1.116. It got fixed somewhere in between there. The fix is not mentioned in the change logs, but PPI changes are mentioned. May have been a PPI error.


7

The error parameter to IPC::Open3::open3 should not be undefined. The synopsis for IPC::Open3 uses the Symbol::gensym function to pre-initialize the error argument: my($wtr, $rdr, $err); use Symbol 'gensym'; $err = gensym; $pid = open3($wtr, $rdr, $err, 'some cmd and args', 'optarg', ...); The input and output parameters can be replaced with autogenerated ...


7

Running perlcritic --verbose '%d\n' will give you the explanations, too: The string form of `eval' is recompiled every time it is executed, whereas the block form is only compiled once. Also, the string form doesn't give compile-time warnings. eval "print $foo"; # not ok eval {print $foo}; # ok It's applicable to the ...


6

G'day, It's pretty much your call as to the added value of such extra information. Sometimes you're right, it doesn't add anything to explain what's going on and just make the code look messy. But, for complex regexp's the x flag can be a boon. Actually, this "making a call" regarding the added value of additional information can be quite difficult. I ...


6

Both of them can be configured into detail. I have no idea why perltidy wouldn't like it, it has nothing to do with it. Perltidy only governs style. You can change the style of your code without changing any functionality, it's mostly a matter of whitespace really. You should either change your style or change the perltidy configuration using the ...


6

Earlier versions of Perl::Critic's "use strict" policy wasn't aware of Moose enabling strict for you, but that'll be fixed if you upgrade Perl::Critic. I use both Perl::Critic and Perl::Tidy with Moose, and I don't see anything particularly broken. Well, actually, I can't get Perl::Tidy to layout things like this properly: my $apple = Apple->new({ ...


6

The highly-unintuitive --verbose flag is what you want, according to How do I make Perl::Critic show the offending policy in its output? gdarcy@greg-pc:~$ perlcritic --verbose 8 src/Some/Module.pm [TestingAndDebugging::RequireUseStrict] Code before strictures are enabled at line 19, column 1. (Severity: 5) [Variables::RequireLexicalLoopIterators] Loop ...


5

Um, isn't the purpose of the whine to get you to have smaller blocks of code that do just one thing? make a subroutine that does what's needed for each line. Many people have suggested split /\n/. split /^/ is more like the filehandle way.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible