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5

\my $err returns a reference to the new variable $err. remove_tree expects the values of the error option to be a reference to a scalar. The reference tells remove_tree where the errors should be stored. error => my $err would pass the value of $err (undef) rather than a means of locating $err.


4

Perl modules include subroutines. Usually, the reason to use a module is to make use of the subroutines from that module. A module will have its own package name and the subroutines from that module will exist in that package. So a simple module might look like this: package MyModule; sub my_sub { print "This is my sub\n"; } If I load that module in my ...


4

The built-in module Time::Local provides the inverse of localtime and gmtime, timelocal and timegm. They take dates and times and return epoch time. perlfaq4 covers these sorts of questions.


3

remove_tree( 'foo/bar', 'bar/rat', {error => \my $err} ); is a shorthand way of doing this: my $err; remove_tree( 'foo/bar', 'bar/rat', {error => \$err} ); The \$err means "reference to $err".


3

No, my has higher precedence than \ in Perl, so it's the whole expression my $err which \ is being applied to. \ itself isn't really an escape; to quote http://perldoc.perl.org/perlref.html#Making-References : References can be created in several ways. By using the backslash operator on a variable, subroutine, or value. (This works much like the ...


2

To call it separately if both exported, use : CSS::Minifier::minify(); or JavaScript::Minifier::minify();


2

Windows won't be a problem with ActivePerl or Strawberry Perl. You can run your program as a service if you can follow a few easy directions. When you say "agent" do you mean "network service"? You can use HTTP::Server::Simple to do a basic http-based agent, or if you want to build your own protocol you can always use IO::Socket::INET. Ultimately it ...


2

When you run a shell script, it's done in a sub-shell so it cannot affect the parent shell's environment. So when you declare a variable as key=value its scope is limited to the sub-shell context. You want to source the script by doing: . ./myscript.sh This executes it in the context of the current shell, not as a sub shell. From the bash man page: . ...


2

Define environments variables : user level : in your ~/.profile or ~/.bash_profile or ~/.bash_login or ~/.bashrc system level : in /etc/profile or /etc/bash.bashrc or /etc/environment For example add tow lines foreach variable : FOO=myvalue export FOO To read this variable in bash script : #! /bin/bash echo $FOO in perl script : #! /bin/perl ...


2

Yes, this can be done, and if you do, it's best to use a module for it: Net::SSH. But this is probably a bad idea. You will need to specify the username and password in plaintext in a place where your Perl script can read them (e.g. in its source code). Anyone who can read your script can also read the username and password, and execute any remote command ...


1

Parse::Eyapp looks like satysfying 5.8.8, pure perl and dependency requirements. As for speed, it claims LALR parsers, which must be faster than recursive descent. A grammar for expressions is given in the doc. Hope it helps.


1

It is not necessary, and you can safely remove it.


1

Ideally, you should use a CSV library such as Text::CSV_XS. If the only problem is extra commas in fields, and not extra quotes, there is a trick I will share. $line_out = '"'.join('","', @fields).'"' RFC4180 says to quote fields, i.e. "field1","field2","compound,field" , when fields may contain commas, newlines, and such.


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You can use the fully qualified names to reference subroutines and remove ambiguity. And create shorter names with aliases. use CSS::Minifier; use JavaScript::Minifier; BEGIN { *minify_css = \&{CSS::Minifier::minify}; *minify_js = \&{JavaScript::Minifier::minify}; } minify_css(...); minify_js(...);



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