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4

If these are constants which may need to to be interpolated into strings etc, consider grouping related constants into a hash, and making the hash constant using Const::Fast. This reduces namespace pollution, allows you to inspect all constants in a specific group etc. For example, consider the READYSTATE enumeration values for IE's ReadyState property. ...


4

Actual constants: use constant qw( ); use Exporter qw( import ); our @EXPORT_OK; my %constants = ( MY_CONSTANT1 => 'constant1', MY_CONSTANT2 => 'constant2', ... ); push @EXPORT_OK, keys(%constants); constant->import(\%constants); Variables made read-only with Readonly: use Exporter qw( import ); use Readonly qw( Readonly ); our ...


4

An our statement just creates a package variable (whereas my creates a lexical variable). It has nothing to do with exporting The best option is probably to declare the variable in the Output package and access it as $Output::verbose elsewhere. Like this main.pl #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use File::Basename; use lib dirname $0; use ...


3

You can use CPAN module List::Permutor to print all possible permutations. For example: use List::Permutor; my $perm = new List::Permutor qw/ fred barney betty /; while (my @set = $perm->next) { print "One order is @set.\n"; } Another module is Algorithm::Permute - Handy and fast permutation with object oriented interface.


3

our declares a package variable in the current package. The one in main.pl refers to $main::verbose; the one in Output.pm refers to $Output::verbose. You can use the full name $main::verbose to access the variable from anywhere, but you can't really "export" it because exporting refers to making symbols accessible to users of your module. You're trying to ...


2

This is because Archive::Tar reads the given tar file into memory. Use Archive::Tar->iter which returns an iterator function that reads the tar file without loading it all in memory. Each time the function is called it will return the next file in the tarball. The files are returned as Archive::Tar::File objects. The iterator function returns ...


2

The value that you read from <> will include a newline character. None of the keys in your hash contain a newline. Therefore $i will never be found in your hash. You want to remove the newline from $i using chomp(). chomp($i = <>);


2

I'm having a hard time understanding your code, but I think your problem is - you're trying do to it quite a heavy weight sort of a way, but importantly - you're not actually 'unwinding' the tail of your recursion. The point of a recursive algorithm is you traverse deep but collate the results. So I'd approach your problem like this: #!/usr/bin/env perl ...


1

Use require to execute the another program. Try this test1.pl print "enter the user data "; chomp($var=<>); print "the entered data:$var\n"; test2.pl require "test1.pl"; print "$var\n"; Then easily access the $var from the test1.pl.


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version has come with Perl since Perl 5.10, so it's weird that you would have to install it. $ corelist version version was first released with perl v5.9.0 But version is also available on CPAN in its own distribution in order to allow people to upgrade version without upgrading Perl. So you may indeed install it as any other module. cpan version


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OK, so first: your link is to CPAN/Version.pm. This is very different than version.pm. Directory names and the path relative to Perl's include directory are very important to Perl, and putting a .pm file in the wrong location relative to the include path can break Perl pretty badly. Second: because of that, never install Perl modules manually. Use cpanm ...


1

I bet that in the top of the program, the part you didn't display in your question, your main program code is calling one or more of those subroutines. When you declare a variable with my or our, the initialization does not happen at compile-time. It only happens when normal program flow gets to the statement. If my hunch is right, you can fix this ...



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