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16

No, h2xs is not deprecated. Module::Starter is certainly more convenient if you create many pure Perl modules, but there's no reason to avoid h2xs. I would recommend reading all the way through its doc before using it, though, so that you know what all you might want it to do or not do.


10

I can think of at least three reasons to use XS: You have a C library you want to access in Perl 5 You have a block of code that is provably slowing down your program and it would be faster if written in C You need access to something only available in XS Reason 1 is obvious and should need no explaination. When you really need reason 2 is less obvious. ...


10

newHV (like newSV, newAV, etc.) sets the reference count of the newly created value to 1. To free it, you just need to decrement it to 0. There's no special function for that for HVs, so just use SvREFCNT_dec: HV* hash = newHV(); /* * use the hash */ SvREFCNT_dec((SV *) hash);


7

Well, the pattern of "create a template array, do av_make(), then free the template" is not very good -- you'd be much better by simply creating your array with newAV(), av_extend()ing it to the right size, and then doing av_store(newSVnv(...)) for each element. That lets you avoid the intermediate SVtempArray allocations entirely. However, that's not what ...


7

newHV returns an HV with a reference count (refcnt) of one, signifying your code's hold on that HV. When you're done with that HV, you must release your hold on it by decrementing its refcnt. There are three common ways of doing this. Done with it here and now. SvREFCNT_dec((SV*)hv); // hv is no longer safe to use here. AV and HV are "subclasses" of SV. ...


7

Did you recompile the XS extensions when you moved to 5.10.0? Did you set Perl 5.10.0 to maintain backwards compatibility when you built it? (Is that even possible? I've never tried to build backwards compatibility, so I can't be sure it is even an option, and @Ysth thinks it is not.) I've seen similar problems when working between main versions of Perl, ...


6

Perl_croak() is documented here on the perlapi man page. As the example on that page shows, you can either pass it a message string, or you can manually set $@ to an exception object and pass NULL.


6

This is actually rather straightforward: hello.h #ifndef H_HELLO const char *hello(void); #define H_HELLO #endif hello.c const char * hello(void) { return "Hello"; } Example.xs #define PERL_NO_GET_CONTEXT #include "EXTERN.h" #include "perl.h" #include "XSUB.h" #include "ppport.h" #include "hello.h" MODULE = My::Example PACKAGE = ...


5

Personally I just use Module::Starter and add the .xs file myself. It depends on what your aim is: if you're making a one-on-one mapping to a C api then h2xs can do a lot of boilerplate for you, but if you're making a completely new interface, or when you're only doing things with perl itself (and not some external library) it doesn't add much but trouble ...


5

Not in the code, but in the build/configure system. For example in CMake, you could use try_compile and provide it a sample file. ... try_compile(PRE_STANDARD_HEADERS tmp_builds pre_standard_headers_test.cpp) if ( ${PRE_STANDARD_HEADERS} ) add_definitions( -D PRE_STANDARD_HEADERS ) endif() You'd need to make that pre_standard_headers_test.cpp .. just ...


5

XSUBs actually don't require there to be an external library. They merely provide the ability to call to a c function from perl space, and provide some convenience in mapping the calling conventions between C and Perl. All you need to do is register XSUBs you compiled into the embedding application with the perl interpreter you're embedding. #include ...


4

It turns out that Module::Build is perfectly capable of compiling XS. Here is a complete Build.PL I managed to scrape together: use strict; use Module::Build; my $build = Module::Build->new( module_name => 'Chocolate::Belgian', dynamic_config => 1, license => 'perl', requires => { 'Module::Build' => ...


4

I'd say that it'd be cleaner, tidier, easier to read, and easier to change, to keep the Moose module separate from the XS module. Otherwise you're violating the single responsibility principle - your moose class both defines program behaviour and the XS interface.


3

You haven't told it to link with the library that contains cpro_supported. (A -L option just tells the linker where it can find libraries; it doesn't actually tell it to link with any additional libraries. You need a -l option for that.) MYEXTLIB is intended for C libraries that are built as part of the module's build process, not libraries installed on ...


3

Why do you think you need the source code to the getpagesize function? You just link to the system's version. I haven't tried it, but something like this should work: #include "EXTERN.h" #include "perl.h" #include "XSUB.h" #include <unistd.h> /* man 2 getpagesize says to use this */ MODULE = Sys::Getpagesize PACKAGE = Sys::Getpagesize int ...


3

At the XS layer, you'll get byte or UTF-8 strings. In the general case, your code will likely contain a char * to point at the next item in the string, incrementing it as it goes. For a useful set of UTF-8 support functions to use in XS, read the "Unicode Support" section of perlapi An example of mine from ...


3

In a few cases, better memory management is another reason for using XS. For example, if you have a very large block of objects of some similar type, this can be managed more efficiently through XS. KinoSearch uses this for tokens, for example, where start and end offsets in a large string can be managed more effectively through XS than as a huge pool of ...


3

I know this is not built into either MakeMaker or Module::Build. There might be a thing on CPAN to do it, but the usual way is to use ExtUtils::CBuilder to compile up a little test program and see if it runs. use ExtUtils::CBuilder; open my $fh, ">", "try.c" or die $!; print $fh <<'END'; #include <time.h> int main(void) { struct tm ...


3

The following code implements a typical sub new { my $class = shift; return bless {@_} => $class; } constructor in XS. It's copied verbatim from Class::XSAccessor. I would suggest you investigate Class::XSAccessor for cases when you are using an ordinary hash based object. No need to reinvent this wheel. void new(class, ...) SV* class; ...


3

I got the answer from XS Mechanics. Thanks For your help


2

I was using 32bit Perl 5.10.0 on a 64bit machine. Problem solved! Thanks to everyone who responded.


2

You either have to use the definitions that your existing perl understands, or compile a new perl with the definitions that you want. You don't need to replace the existing perl, though. You can install the new perl separately so they don't conflict. If you want it both ways, you have to figure out which definitions your Perl has and write code that ...


2

Dist::Zilla is not a replacement for EUMM or Module::Build, what it will do is generate a Makefile.Pl (etc) for you, I would not be surprised to hear that it can't do this for an XS project, but there are ways of managing your own for a dzil project. It can work with whatever Makefile.Pl it is provided with (or Build.pl). So my answer on the Dist::Zilla ...


2

If you're expecting bytes: STRLEN len; char* buf = SvPVbyte(sv, len); while (len--) { char byte = *(buf++); ... do something with byte ... } If you're expecting text or any non-byte characters: STRLEN len; U8* buf = SvPVutf8(sv, len); while (len) { STRLEN ch_len; UV ch = utf8n_to_uvchr(buf, len, &ch_len, 0); buf += ch_len; len -= ...


1

You should simply be able to do: getconf PAGESIZE


1

I wrote a wrapper around ExtUtils::CBuilder for doing "does this C code compile?" type tests in Build.PL or Makefile.PL scripts, called ExtUtils::CChecker. For example, you can easily test the above by: use Module::Build; use ExtUtils::CChecker; my $cc = ExtUtils::CChecker->new; $cc->try_compile_run( define => "TRY_ACCRIGHTS_NOT_CMSG", ...


1

Don't know if that would be of much help but you can take a look at App::Staticperl. I was able to build DBI and DBD::Informix with it in Solaris, maybe it will work in HP-UX as well.


1

I don't know if there is anything useful in this email that I collected and preserved as part of the background information for Perl's DBD::Informix module. Date: Wed, 13 Aug 1997 13:02:04 -0500 (CDT) From: "Kent S. Gordon" [email deleted] Subject: Re: Easy way to force static Informix libraries with DBD:Informix >> "kgor" == Kent S Gordon ...


1

The standard approach for Linux and other Unix-friendly platforms is to use a configure script. The script will generate as its output a Makefile and a config.h header file that turns on or off any compiler features that your code could rely on when available. For Windows it is kind of expected that you will provide solution and project files for Visual ...


1

Not exactly. A signal is sent to and trapped by a process, not objects. Another approach might be to maintain a global list of all the objects that must be cleaned up, and install a single signal handler that will clean up each object on that list.



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