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11

The Perl::Critic module on CPAN has a utility called perlcritic that aims to detect any violations of recommendations from Perl Best Practices. It's not limited just to PBP, though, and there happen to be many policy modules on CPAN that plug into Perl::Critic to provide additional rules. If you prefer not to install Perl::Critic, you can paste your code ...


5

What can this regex match ? This regex won't match anything and is guaranteed to fail because: ab - will literally match ab (?=.{1}) - will use lookup to make sure there is at least 1 character after ab $ - will assert end of input after ab both conditions can never be met hence your regex will always fail.


4

So you have a reference to an array you want to dereference. The equivalent of @array for when you have a reference is @{ $ref }, so print("@array\n"); print(join(', ', @array), "\n"); would be print("@{ $_->{value} }\n"); print(join(', ', @{ $_->{value} }), "\n"); References: Mini-Tutorial: Dereferencing Syntax References quick reference ...


4

I suspect that what you want to do is simply not natively possible with alarm on Windows. From perldoc perlport: alarm Emulated using timers that must be explicitly polled whenever Perl wants to dispatch "safe signals" and therefore cannot interrupt blocking system calls. (Win32)


3

I don't know why you are using sed. Change your script to this. r - perform non-destructive substitution and return the new value Check here #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; my $name="FILE_NAME_<DATE>.txt"; my $findDT="<DATE>"; my $dt="20150101"; my $changedFileName = $name=~ s/$findDT/$dt/r; print "Before Change: $name \n"; ...


3

You don't need sed, which works on the content of a file. You can do this: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; my $name="FILE_NAME_<DATE>.txt"; my $findDT="<DATE>"; my $dt="20150101"; # First make a copy of your original variable my $realFileName = $name; # Then, replace the variable $realFileName =~ s/$findDT/$dt/; print "$name\n"; ...


3

You can use CPAN module List::Permutor to print all possible permutations. For example: use List::Permutor; my $perm = new List::Permutor qw/ fred barney betty /; while (my @set = $perm->next) { print "One order is @set.\n"; } Another module is Algorithm::Permute - Handy and fast permutation with object oriented interface.


3

You can do that. Look at LWP or WWW::Mechanize, but you would very likely be contravening the site's terms and conditions Furthermore, if you are trying every product ID from zero up to 75668, and each internet transaction takes (a very optimistic) three seconds, then it will take you nearly three days. And I assume you don't want to stop at 75668


3

Well, you can do this: perl -pe 's/"(,+)"/"\t" x length($1)/eg' This uses the x operator to produce as many tabs as there were commas.


2

Turn on warnings too, and you'll get: Found = in conditional, should be == at line 12. Basically - your 'test' doesn't work at all. What are are evaluating is 'did I set $Mailed to 1' and funnily enough it's always working. Try this snippet: my $Mailed = 0; if ( $Mailed = 1 ) { print "Yes\n"; } Now() isn't a real function either. Maybe you were ...


2

It is easy using lookarounds in perl: s='"asd,f",,,"as,df","asdf"asdf"' perl -pe 's/(?<!\w)-|-(?!\w)//g' <<< "$s" ONE Tw'o 333 'FO-UR' (?<!\w)- # Lookbehind meaning match - if not preceded by a word character | # regex alternation (?<!\w)- # Lookahead meaning match - if not followed by a word character


2

Here's the perl version: echo "--ONE Tw'o-- -333- -'FO-UR'" | perl -ne "s|-'||g; s|'-||g; s|^'||; s|'$||; s|^-+||; s|-+$||; s|-+\s+| |g; s|\s+-+| |g; s|\s+| |g; s|\s+$||; print;" ONE Tw'o 333 FO-UR The sed version is basically identical: echo "--ONE Tw'o-- -333- -'FO-UR'" | sed -r -e "s|-'||g; s|'-||g; s|^'||; s|'$||; s|^-+||; s|-+$||; ...


2

I'm having a hard time understanding your code, but I think your problem is - you're trying do to it quite a heavy weight sort of a way, but importantly - you're not actually 'unwinding' the tail of your recursion. The point of a recursive algorithm is you traverse deep but collate the results. So I'd approach your problem like this: #!/usr/bin/env perl ...


1

Without your source information, I can't tell for sure, but think you probably have a fence post error here: (my $fl_1, my $fl_2, my $fl_3, my $fl_4, my @subfields) = split; for (my $k=5; $k <= 53; $k++) { if(isdigit($subfields[$k])) { You're iterating @subfields from 5 to 53. But the first 'subfield' field is the '4th' field in your ...


1

thank you, everyone. here is the working version: #!/usr/bin/perl -w use strict; sub term_interactive { return -t STDIN && -t STDOUT; } print "terminal is ".((term_interactive)?"interactive":"batch")."\n"; print "type password : "; use Term::ReadKey; ReadMode 2; # noecho open(my $KEYIN, "/dev/tty") or die "cannot open tty for read\n"; ...


1

It is not matching because you are giving spaces at if (/CURRENT_RUN_ID = \s*(.*)/) in the match.It is searching for spaces in the string. The pattern what you are trying to match will match CURRENT_RUN_ID = 1636 string, notice the spaces between CURRENT_RUN_ID and = and after =. If there is match then the no of spaces in the pattern should be exactly ...


1

every scroll request should use the most recent scroll id i.e scroll_id returned in previous scroll response. Looking from the code excerpt looks like you are using the the scroll id from the first response probably changing that to use the most recent scroll_id should help i.e. in the while block you would need $scrollID = $decoded->{ "_scroll_id" ...


1

First of all, -i doesn't do anything by itself; you have to actually read from the ARGV filehandle (which empty <> does, or the -n or -p switches). When you do that, and -i is set, it will open the file on the command line (to the ARGV filehandle) and rename it with the extension you specify (or unlink it if you don't specify an extension) and open a ...


1

awk to the rescue awk 'FNR == NR { # collect the keys and count from first file ks[$1]++ next } FNR != NR && FNR==1 { # when switched to second file, print the counts print "\t$VAR1={" # in the format for (k in ks) { print "\t\t" k "=>" ks[k] "," } print "\t};\n" } { print $3,$4,$5 # print the ...


1

Update TL;DR: You should change $value =~ /($localEpitope)/g to $value =~ /$localEpitope/ Okay now that we know the real circumstances, the problem (as melpomene points out in his comment) is that you have the /g modifier on your pattern match. There's no reason for that; you don't want check how many times the substring appears, you just want to know ...


1

You seem to have made very little effort to solve this yourself, and your problem description is imprecise. Please try to keep your Perl code tidy and indented properly; I shouldn't have had to edit your question so that I could read it. And use meaningful names for your identifiers; calling a hash %x doesn't help anyone to understand what you have written ...


1

Error #1 -f `/tmp/Mail.lock` should be -f '/tmp/Mail.lock' The former tries to execute /tmp/Mail.lock, and tests if the result (undef) is the name of an plain file. This problem have been discovered by use warnings;. Always use use strict; use warnings;. Error #2 if ( $Mailed = 1 ) { should be if ( $Mailed == 1 ) { What you have assigns 1 to ...


1

Removing the testTag element would remove all of its children too, so we must move the children of each testTag element into the parent of the testTag element before deleting the testTag element. In XML::LibXML, this is done as follows: (Tested) for my $node ($doc->findnodes('/Errors/Error//testTag')) { my $parent = $node->parentNode(); for my ...


1

First off - I don't think what you're trying to do is necessarily particularly useful. However, I'll note - when you're processing your nodes - if you've got a nested node like in your second example, you actually get 3 'nodes' but two of which designated as #PCDATA. So you could do something like this: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use ...


1

In XML::XSH2 which is just a wrapper around XML::LibXML, the following seems to work: for //testTag/text() { insert text 'HELLO' prepend . ; insert text 'HELLO' append . ; move . replace .. ; } Translation back to XML::LibXML is left as an exercise for the reader.


1

My test case: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use XML::Twig; my $version = '6.0'; my $twig = XML::Twig->new( pretty_print => 'indented_a' )->parse( \*DATA ); for my $number ( $twig->findnodes('/Install/version/number') ) { $number->parent->delete if $number->trimmed_text eq $version; } $twig->print; __DATA__ ...



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