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4

What I would do using your base code : use strict; use warnings; use LWP::UserAgent; use HTTP::Request; my $arg1 = "Rower"; # Create a user agent object use LWP::UserAgent; my $ua = LWP::UserAgent->new; # Create a request my $req = HTTP::Request->new(GET => "http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/$arg1"); # Pass request to the user agent and get a ...


4

You could try: print "same\n" if (last_part($a) eq last_part($b)); sub last_part { $_[0] =~ s{^.*?/}{/}r } If you don't have 5.14+, you'd have to use something a little wordier. sub last_part { my ($s) = @_; $s =~ s{^.*?/}{/}; $s }


3

unpack unpacks a string of bytes into scalars with the values represented by those bytes. $ perl -E'say for unpack("nB8", "\x12\x34\x56")' 4660 01010110 You're looking for sprintf("%08B", 7)


2

Using lexical filehandles makes life much easier in general. They aren't global, and they will automatically close when they go out of scope. open (my $wfh1, ">", "${basePath}/QueryResult4.txt"); It's possible the whole problem is that open failed, you're not checking if it succeeded. You can do this two ways. First is to do it by hand... my ...


2

The canonical way of accomplishing this is with 'use lib'. Using a lib of .. is not ideal though, because it's relative to the current working directory when you invoke the script. The way to accomplish this is with FindBin. E.g. use FindBin; use lib $FindBin::Bin."/../"; To traverse up a directory level from the 'base location' of your script.


2

I would highly recommend against using the -% as an option... it's common practice to use any of the 62 available single chars or more verbose long options. What would -% mean anyway ? Isn't it more or less a kind of 'unit' in which another argument or option needs to be handled ? draw_rect .... --opacity 0.75 # for a range between 0 .. 1.000 draw_rect ...


2

It's just because of typecasting in PHP. You have an empty string only in two cases: "" and "0" http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.boolean.php


1

This is how to do it in bash. Reads form stdin, writes to stdout #!/bin/bash declare -A known # an associative array while read line do eval set $line string="$1" number="$3" i="${known["$string"]}" if test -z "$i" then known["$string"]=0 else let ++i known["$string"]=$i string="$string $i" fi echo ...


1

You are using the ternary operator which checks for the truthiness of the expression before the ?. The truthiness of values is described in the Booleans section: When converting to boolean, the following values are considered FALSE: the boolean FALSE itself the integer 0 (zero) the float 0.0 (zero) the empty string, and the string "0" an ...


1

Using perl from command line, perl -pe 's/"(.+)\K(?=")/( map $_ ? " $_" : "", $h{$1}++ )[0]/e' file


1

You're specification is rather sloppy, but I think this will do as you ask. It takes the first non-blank line from the input as the header line, and creates a list of corresponding indices in @indices. The corresponding columns from each subsequent are printed to STDOUT. use strict; use warnings; my @selection = qw( name1 name3 name85 ); my ...


1

$ awk -F'" *= *' 'c[$1]++{sub(FS," "c[$1]"&")}1' file "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder" = 99047, "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder 2" = 99197, "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder 3" = 99411, "Battleplate of the Prehistoric Marauder 4" = 99603, "Battlescar Boots" = 28747,


1

You need to wrap $result in brackets to force list context instead of scalar context. The Perl documentation for grep says "Evaluates the BLOCK or EXPR for each element of LIST (locally setting $_ to each element) and returns the list value consisting of those elements for which the expression evaluated to true. In scalar context, returns the ...


1

Your question is a bit too broad to meaningfully answer. It depends on the module. At a pretty basic level though - you retrieve some code, and you put it in a location where perl will find it when you use Modulename;. This might be pure perl, but it doesn't have to be. local::lib supplement this process, giving you a mechanism for installing things when ...


1

There's a simple solution. If your rename command is fine but you want it recursive, then : bash4 shopt -s globstar rename 's/^\.\/\d+\.(\w+)$/\1/' ** find find -type f -exec rename 's/^\.\/\d+\.(\w+)$/\1/' {} + There are other tools with the same name which may or may not be able to do this, so be careful. If you run the following command (linux) ...


1

Perl has no concept of default browser. As you can see in its documentation, Browser::Open will go down the list of known browser invocation commands and use the first one that works. Firefox apparently happens to be higher on the list than Chromium. If you want to invoke Chromium, then just invoke Chromium yourself. Something like this should do: ...


1

One solution using match operator : $ perl -e ' my $fp = "/path/to/file.pl"; my ($path, $file) = $fp =~ m!(.*/)(.*)!; print "path=$path\nfile=$file\n" ' or : $ perl -e ' $fp = "/path/to/file.pl"; $fp =~ m!(.*/)(.*)! and print "path=$1\nfile=$2\n" ' OUTPUT: path=/path/to/ file=file.pl


1

Lists and arrays are subtly different. You can't pass an array to a subroutine; all subroutines take lists and return lists; the entire list that is passed is available in the subroutine as if it were the array @_. In this case, you are passing 100, 1..10, so @_ will in fact contain 100, 1, 2, 3, ..., 10. This isn't actually a problem in your code, but you ...



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