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4

It would be extremely misleading to the reader, and it would fail silently. I can't think of any reason you'd want to do that.


3

You'll have to read the BOM yourself. use IO::Unread qw( unread ); open(my $fh_in, "<:raw", $qfn) or die; my $rv = read($fh_in, my $buf, 4); defined($rv) or die; my $encoding; my $bom_present; if ($buf =~ s/^\x00\x00\xFE\xFF//) { $encoding = 'UTF-32be'; $bom_present = 1; } elsif ($buf =~ s/^\xFF\xFE\x00\x00//) { $encoding = 'UTF-32le'; ...


3

You never use $name1, $name2, etc, much less in a match (or substitution) operator, so you ever execute any regex match. my $field_names = $csv_fh->header(); my ($name1_header) = grep /First Name|^Name$|1st Name/i, @$field_names; my ($name2_header) = grep /Last Name|Maiden Name|2nd Name/i, @$field_names; my ($dob_header ) = grep /date of ...


3

The easiest way is probably to use the q (equivalent to single quotes) and qq (equivalent to double quotes) operators: my $str_with_quotes = qq(Hello "'world'"!); my $cmd3 = qq(say q(c: $str_with_quotes)); Note that, when using q/qq, you do not escape any single/double quotes in the string.


3

There's no way to add to a compiled pattern without recompiling the entire new pattern. Even /^$re$/ and qr/^$re$/ needs to recompile the entire pattern (although /$re/ doesn't). But if it'll ever be possible to extend already compiled patterns, surely /^$re$/ and qr/^$re$/ will do that. So that's your best option. sub _add_context { my ($re, $file, ...


2

Here's the related question about how auto incrementing works: Autoincrementing letters in Perl Like the docs explained, basically you need the variable to match the regex /^[a-zA-Z]*[0-9]*\z/ and only be used in string contexts. Because you have variables that don't match the regex, those ones will be treated as numbers. You can write your own ...


2

If you want to end your program, you can call exit from your signal function. If you have an END block, it will still execute that. Here's a code example. I used SIGINT for it, but SIGALRM works the same way. #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use Try::Tiny; sub sig_int_handler() { # die "Dying from SIGINT\n"; warn "Exiting from SIGINT\n"; ...


2

You can sort by an arbitrary number of fields # note, your columns start at 1, while arrays index from 0 my @cols = map($_-1, @param_cols); my @sorted = sort { my $r = 0; $r ||= $a->[$_] <=> $b->[$_] for @cols; return $r; } @matrix;


2

You will loop through the indices, breaking out of the loop when the comparison shows a difference. @M = map{$a=$_;map{$b=$_;map{$c=$_;map{$d=$_; map[$a,$b,$c,$d,$_],2,1}1,2}2,1}1,2}2,1; sub by_cols { my ($row1,$row2,@indices) = @_; foreach my $col (@indices) { my $d = $row1->[$col] <=> $row2->[$col]; return $d ...


1

Interesting. I looked for I18N::Langinfo on my self-built Perl on Windows, and it is not installed either. I would have expected it to be installed so that it could croak: croak("nl_langinfo() not implemented on this architecture"); It seems to me the problem is not Strawberry or ActiveState specific (because I am building from source). It maybe worth ...


1

How do you output your HTML now? Say you have print(qq{<a href="$link_url">$link_text</a>\n}); Replace it with use CGI qw( escapeHTML ); my $link_url_html = escapeHTML($link_url); my $link_text_html = escapeHTML($link_text); print(qq{<a href="$link_url_html">$link_text_html</a>\n}); Personally, I use Template-Toolkit. <a ...


1

If you intended the variable "@test2" to be an array reference (since [ ] is the anonymous array constructor here) then you should give it a name like $test2 (i.e. a scalar variable) and then dereference it when using grep: my @test2 = ["AAA", "AAB", "AAC"]; my @results = grep(m/AA./, @test); my @results2 = grep(m/AA./, @test2); If you then print ...


1

In python you can use str.find() to find the index of a sub-string inside a string : >>> s '123string 1abcabcstring 2123string 3abc123stringnabc' >>> s.find('3a') 35 string.find(s, sub[, start[, end]]) Return the lowest index in s where the substring sub is found such that sub is wholly contained in s[start:end]. Return -1 on ...


1

When you create the form, supply the information as defaults with -defaults. print $obj->textfield( -name => 'name', -default => "$fname $lname"); Alternatively, write the HTML normally and use Javascript to query a Perl program that returns the user's information as JSON. Javascript can then fill in the blanks. That is the better way to do it, ...


1

i am unable to create a file/folder using these form data in the script, yet i am able to print these values using print Almost certainly, the problem is that your web server doesn't have permissions to create a file in the directory where you are trying to create it. You can check that theory by improving the error checking for the open() call and ...


1

Let's look at this code in some detail. # There's a typo on the line below. It should be /usr/bin/perl #!usr/bin/perl # Never comment out these lines. # Instead, take the time to fix the problems. # Oh, and it's "warnings", not "warning". #use strict; #use warning; # Always check the return value from open() # Please use lexical filehandles. # Please use ...


1

use %ENV for that: #!/usr/bin/perl $ENV{'TEST_ENV'} = 'TEST123';


1

I would probably do something like this: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; my $file = "\\\\FILE"; my $line = "50"; my $regex = _add_context(qr/^Something /ms,$file,$line); sub _add_context { my ($reg, $file, $line) = @_; my $file_regex = quotemeta $file; my $line_regex = quotemeta $line; return ...


1

If you create an inline state that removes aliases and any outstanding alarms your session should end gracefully. It will only remain if it's waiting for an event to return or being used by another session.



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