Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

It's very possible. Set $DB::single in an early BEGIN block. use strict; use warnings; our $x; BEGIN { $DB::single = 1 } BEGIN { $x = 42; } print "$x\n"; $DB::single is a debugger variable used to determine whether the DB::DB function will be invoked at each line. In compilation phase it is usually false but you can set it in compilation phase in a ...


5

encode_json (short for JSON::XS->new->utf8->encode) encodes using UTF-8, then you are re-encoding it by printing it to STDOUT to which you've added an encoding layer. Effectively, you are doing encode_utf8(encode_utf8($uncoded_json)). Solution 1 use open ':std', ':encoding(utf8)'; # Defaults binmode STDOUT; # Override ...


4

No, there is no way to tell perl's DB_File to create a specific version , AFAIK libdb itself doesn't have that feature If you compile/link against version 4.x of libdb, then DB_File only gets to use that version So if you need DB_File that uses libdb-4.x you will have to downgrad or install another copy in a different @INC directory When installing this ...


4

Disclaimer: This is just an attempt to explain the behaviour. Devel::Trace hooks up to the Perl debugging API through the DB model. That is just code. It installs a sub DB::DB. The big question is, when is that executed. According to perlmod, there are five block types that are executed at specific points during execution. One of them is BEGIN, which is ...


4

From perlref Because curly brackets (braces) are used for several other things including BLOCKs, you may occasionally have to disambiguate braces at the beginning of a statement by putting a + or a return in front so that Perl realizes the opening brace isn't starting a BLOCK. The economy and mnemonic value of using curlies is deemed worth this ...


2

Just pass -- before the flags that are to go to the program, like so: perl -e 'print join("/", @ARGV)' -- -foo bar prints -foo/bar


2

JSON::XS encodes its output into octets. It means the external representation of encoded utf8 string, but it is not unicode string. For more details see perlunicode. In short, content of $json_text is prepared for transmitting by IO handler in binary code. If you create scalar content of $data{code} after use utf8; you have scalar containing internally ...


3

The %hash variable in your "MAIN CODE" section and the %hash variable in your "MODULE CODE" section are not the same variable. One of them is %main::hash and the other is %test_module::hash; If you want a subroutine to be able to modify a variable, you need to pass a reference to that variable: Main code: #!/usr/bin/perl use test_module; my %hash; ...


2

For small simple parser jobs like this sort of thing, I wrote Parser::MGC. Your particular case of numerical expression evaluation is likely some variant of one of the examples, namely https://metacpan.org/source/PEVANS/Parser-MGC-0.13/examples/eval-expr.pl


3

I'm not sure what you're expecting. You're calling module::add_number, which doesn't exist -- there is only a test_module::add_number. And the add_number subroutine is modifying the $%test_module::hash hash whereas your main code is printing %main::hash You must always use strict and use warnings at the top of every Perl program. That will reveal many ...


2

You can achieve this with a negative lookahead: (TEST_CASE_NAME.*?:(.*?)\n.*?PRIORITY.*?:(?!P3)(\w\d).*?=cut) ^^^^^^ See demo The lookahead (?!P3) makes sure the next 2 characters matched by (\w\d) are not equal to P3.


1

You are using assignment = instead of comparison ==. Use: perl -pi -e "s/$find/$replace/ if $. == $lineNum" $file where there are some caveats about the content of $find, $replace and $lineNum that probably aren't going to be a problem. The caveats are issues such as $find cannot contain a slash; $replace can't contain a slash either; $lineNum needs to ...


1

Assuming your filenames don't contain newlines, you can do it with cpio(1): find . -type f \( -name '*.sh' -o -name '*.[jw]ar' \) -print | \ cpio -oa | \ ssh "${USER}@${MACHINE}" "cd ${remotePrefix}; cpio -idm"


1

Try this use warnings; use strict; my $s = "AAAAATTTTTGGGGGGCCCCCAAAATTTTAAAGGF"; my @va = $s =~m/(.)\1*/g; print @va,"\n";


1

It's hard to be sure what you need, but it looks like you can split each line on whitespace and select just the first three fields, rejecting any line whose first field starts with a decimal digit Here's a demonstration which reads from files specified on the command line while ( <> ) { my @fields = split; next if $fields[0] =~ /^[0-9]/; ...


1

Marpa::R2 is in heavy and increasing use. IBM advertises their use of it: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/jalvord/entry/sitworld_itm_situation_audit?lang=en Metacpan lists ~30 direct dependences and there are indirect dependences from those. There are open-source C, ECMAScript parsers. There's more stuff listed on the web site: ...


1

The problem with varying line terminators on different platforms is best solved by using the \R regex expression which matches any single vertical whitespace character (including LF and CR) as well as the CR LF pair that is found in Windows and on the internet Replacing chomp with s/\R\z// will remove the line terminator from any file, regardless of its ...


1

Try to chomp the variable $baseDirPath before using it, As the line you have written should just work.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible