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12

This is harder than printing the first lines! Here are a few options, ranging from least to most clever: Just use tail Because who actually needs a perl script to print the last two lines of a file? Read all the lines from the file into a list, and print the last two. print do { open my $info, $file or die ...; (<$info>)[-2, -1]; }; ...


5

That should be equivalent of what you want my %permissions = ( 'w' => { 'write' => -w $file ? 1 : 0 }, ); or shorter, 'w' => { 'write' => (-w $file) +0 },


3

Use tr to translate characters: my $sentence = 'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.'; $sentence =~ tr{abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz} {qwertyuioplkjhgfdsazxcvbnm}; print $sentence, "\n"; Outputs: Tit dxoel wsgvh ygb pxjftr gcts zit kqmn rgu.


3

Your problem boils down to the following: $ perl -e'print "FOO\n"; kill TERM => $$' FOO Terminated $ perl -e'print "FOO"; kill TERM => $$' Terminated You're suffering from buffering. STDOUT is line-buffered when connected to a terminal. That means it will flush when a newline is output, when the buffer becomes full and on a graceful exit. In the ...


2

If you're attempting to insert at line 9, but finding that the script is just appending, then most likely your line endings are for another system. To inspect your file's line endings, you can try the following command: perl -MData::Dumper -e '$Data::Dumper::Useqq = 1; print Dumper scalar <>;' file If you find they're incorrect, you can perhaps fix ...


2

Perl doesn't have a direct equivalent to Pry. For your particular example I'd use the debugger. You don't need to add anything to your source code. Just invoke perl with the -d option: perl -d script.pl From there, it's a matter of using debugger commands. Some of the more commonly used ones are: b set a breakpoint c continue s single step (step into) n ...


2

It would have helped a lot if you could have shown an example of the HTML you are processing. Instead I have imagined this, which I hope is close. <html> <head> <title>Title</title> </head> <body> <div class="pagination-block"> <div class="page-of-pages">Page 99 of ...


2

You are creating new copies of %hh for each loop iteration, and each sub usage. You pass your argument by reference, but that does not matter, since you copy the values anyway inside the sub. This: my %foo = %$bar; ..makes a copy of $bar, and any changes to %foo is not passed on to $bar. Here is a commented version of your script: foreach(@RR) { my ...


2

The code that you're using should be work for the data you provided, so I suspect you are not providing us with all the information. However, I would suggest making either of these two potential improvements: Do exact matching on the keys instead of global .*? Use lookahead for the ending quote delimiter so that you can test between all double quotes. ...


2

Such construct is not permitted, you can use the unless clause only at the end of a statement. You can use the ternary operator: my %permissions = ( 'w' => { 'write' => (-w $file ? 'some_value' : 0 ) }, 'r' => { 'read' => (-r $file ? 'some_value' : 0 ) }, 'x' => { 'execute' => (-x $file ? 'some_value' : 0 ) }, )


2

Unless there is more to your hash than you have said, it is pointless having two levels of hash as it just means you will have to write $permissions{r}{read}, $permissions{w}{write} etc. I suggest it's best to just use the first level key alone. In addition, as you will probably be using the hash values as booleans in something like if ( $permissions{x} ) ...


2

It isn't an array, you are using a hash (%CHenergy). To print its keys: my @the_keys = keys %CHenergy; print join(", ", @the_keys), "\n"; The module Data::Dumper may helps you to show the variable contents: use Data::Dumper; #... print Dumper(%CHenergy), "\n"; Note: use the modern perl approach to handle files: open (HND,"$outputFile"); should be ...


1

$fh->close(); $sel->remove($fh); You must first remove the file descriptor from the select and then close it. Once it is closed it is no longer valid (that is fileno($fh) will return undef) and cannot be removed. And if cannot be removed select will still try to select on this (invalid) file descriptor, causing EBADF.


1

You can use Tie::File or File::ReadBackwards. The code looks like this. Using Tie::File use strict; use warnings; use Tie::File; my $file = 'test.txt'; tie my @file, 'Tie::File', $file or die $!; print "\nUsing Tie::File\n"; print "$_\n" for @file[-2,-1]; Using File::Readbackwards use strict; use warnings; use File::Readbackwards; my $file = ...


1

use utf8; just instructs the interpreter to read your source file as UTF-8. Use the open pragma to set the default IO layers to UTF-8 (or manually specify '<:encoding(UTF-8)' as the second argument to open). Don't use printf when print will suffice (it usually does, due to interpolation). In this particular instance, I find a heredoc to be most readable. ...


1

Just match the part before WHERE and make it as optional to work on both lines, (?:\s+|.*?(?=\S+ \d))?(?<SearchCondition>[^,]+?)\s*(?<Connector>(AND|OR|$)) DEMO


1

Just change your regex to, (R\d+-\d+(?:B|G)\d+$) What's the actual problem is (R\d+-\d+B|G\d+$) regex first check for the words starts with R followed by one or more digits again followed by - and finally B at the last. But in your input there isn't a word like this. So this would fail. Next it goes to the second part that starts with G, finally it ...


1

1) You could just use a print() statement: use strict; use warnings; use 5.016; use Data::Dumper; my @data = ( {a => 1, b => 2}, {c => 3, d => 4}, {a => 5, b => 6}, ); my %team_hash; for my $href (@data) { %team_hash = %$href; print "$_ $team_hash{$_}\n" for (keys %team_hash); say '-' x 10; } --output:-- a 1 b ...



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