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5

The reason your code: my @subs = ('sub1', 'sub2'); use test @subs; doesn't work is that use statements are evaluated immediately during parsing, before (almost) any other code. Thus, the second line of your code actually runs before the first one, and so @subs is still empty at that point. This would work: my @subs; BEGIN { @subs = ('sub1', 'sub2'); } ...


5

There's perldoc perlstyle in the standard documentation. Regarding aesthetics of code lay out, about the only thing Larry cares strongly about is that the closing curly bracket of a multi-line BLOCK should line up with the keyword that started the construct. Beyond that, he has other preferences that aren't so strong.. .. Larry has his reasons for ...


4

You can use XML::XSH2, a wrapper around XML::LibXML: open file.xml ; set /ROOT/TESTING[INSTANCE]/INSTANCE/PHY/@FREQ 42 ; save :f newname.xml ;


3

I am assuming you want to replace the string inside the files found by find. Command example below will change in-place (-i) any "foo" with "bar" for all *.txt files from curent directory. find . -type f -name '*.txt' -print0 | xargs -0 perl -p -i -e 's/foo/bar/g;' And for your question, you should be able to get it with this command: find . -type f ...


3

qq(something) is just another way to say "something" while q(something) means 'something'. The difference between "this" and 'this' is interpolation, which is enabled only inside double quotes. my $foo = 123; print "<< $foo >>"; # prints << 123 >> print '<< $foo >>'; # prints << $foo >> So, since $ is not ...


3

From perldoc autouse autouse - postpone load of modules until a function is used If the module Module is already loaded, then the declaration use autouse 'Module' => qw(func1 func2($;$)); is equivalent to use Module qw(func1 func2);


3

If you just want to add to an epoch time and get another epoch time, just do: 1372252864.901871 + .0867 If you are doing something else, no, localtime does not preserve fractional seconds. You probably want to use DateTime to deal with fractional seconds: use DateTime; my $time = DateTime->from_epoch(epoch=>1372252864.901871, ...


3

Your second chunk of code isn't written as a subroutine so there is no @_ array to use and my @x = @{ $_[0] } won't work. It also differs from the first chunk because it is expecting a reference to an array of values, whereas the first subroutine just takes a list of values as parameters. The main problem is that you are writing my $Sxx = sum( @x * @x ); ...


2

One difference between GET and POST is that the information for the former is passed in the URL itself. That means you can type what you like in the browser's address bar -- it doesn't have to have come from an HTML form. I think that's what is meant by spoofing here. The most obvious protection is to calculate a CRC of all the protected fields -- in this ...


2

There is a Perl Style guide written by Tom Christiansen, who is one of the top Perlers out there.


2

This is one alternative solution. The code in the question calculates the value of $k every iteration, that's way too often, since you'll only need it if you want to store the value in one of the return arrays. This code loops over the indices from 0 to $#x-1 and makes use of the fact that the index is always stored in $_. This way, you some sort of lazy ...


2

You don't assign anything to $tokpos. The assignment is part of a comment - syntax highlighting in your editor should've told you. strict would've told you, too. Also, you should probably use $prevtokpos in the division: $tokpos is the new value that you haven't met before. To get the output for the last token, you have to process it outside the loop, as ...


2

you forgot two $'s: print "$table1[$k][$l] "; Standard recommendation here: use strict; use warnings; at the beginning of your script, and perl itself tells you about this mistake...


2

Replace if (prompt_yn("Do you want to start a process")){ with while (prompt_yn("Do you want to start a process")){ ?


2

Use Path::Tiny: #!/usr/bin/perl use warnings; use strict; use feature qw{ say }; use Path::Tiny; for my $path (qw( ../dira/dirb/*.txt dira/dirb/dirc/.../dirn/test.pl )) { my $path_o = 'Path::Tiny'->new($path); my $basename = $path_o->basename; my $dirname = $path_o->dirname; $dirname =~ s=/$==; ...


1

You can use File::Basename functions to parse file paths: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use File::Basename; my $string = "../dira/dirb/*.txt"; my $stringA = dirname($string); my $stringB = basename($string); printf "String A: %-25sString B: %s\n", $stringA, $stringB; $string = "dira/dirb/dirc/.../dirn/test.pl"; $stringA = ...


1

I always try to keep the list of modules and other external dependencies as low as possible. This will also work: use strict; use warnings; my @a = qw(1 3 5 7 9); my $b = 0; map {$b += $_} @a; print "b=$b.\n"; map executes the block for each element of the list, setting $_ in turn to each element. You could also use grep, the difference is that map ...


1

Two splits might make it easier for you: my ($transcriptID, $rest) = split(/\|/, $line, 2); my ($isoform, $deseq) = split (/_DESeq/, $rest, 2); $deseq = "_DESeq$deseq"; Transforms: "TR10052|c9_g13_i6_DESeqResultsBacterialen=248 gi|497816164|ref|WP_010130320.1| 97.56 82 2 0 1 246 9 90 7e-51 167" Into: "TR10052", "c9_g13_i6", ...


1

Use a negative look ahead to split on underscores that are not followed by "letter digit". Try splitting on this regex: /\||\_(?![a-z]\d)|\s+/ See live regex demo matching the desired characters on which to split.


1

use always runs in compile time. But require doesn't. So you can use require Module; just before any function call. Of course, the module will be loaded only the first time require is executed (and stay loaded). Mind that use also calls import on the loaded module and you may want to do that too. use Module qw(f1 f2) is a compile-time version of require ...


1

I'd use Perl for its recursive regexes. We can use them to match a brace-enclosed block, from an opening brace to the corresponding closing brace. For example: perl -i -0777 -pe 's/zone\s*"example.net"\s*(\{([^{}]|(?1))*\});\s*//g' foo.conf The tricky part of the regex is (\{([^{}]|(?1))*\}). This is captured as capturing group 1 and referenced ...


1

That zone file obeys the syntax of Tcl, so we can define a procedure named "zone" and read the zone file as if it's a Tcl script: #!/usr/bin/env tclsh lassign $argv domain_to_remove zone_file proc zone {domain body} { if {$domain ne $::domain_to_remove} { puts [format {zone "%s" {%s}} $domain $body] } } source $zone_file and then $ tclsh ...


1

rename -n `s/${line}.mp4/${e}.mp4/` *.mp4 should be mv "${line}.mp4" "${e}.mp4"


1

If List::MoreUtils qualifies as one of Perl's "default tools" as you say in a comment, Math::Geometry::Planar should qualify as well. Math::Geometry::Planar provides a number of handy functions for calculating the intersection of segments, rays, and lines, as well as functions for manipulating polygons, calculating distances, and other goodies. When ...


1

you can try something like this: $string =~ m|^(.*)/(.*)$|; ($stringA,$stringB) = ($1,$2); print "stringA = $stringA\n"; print "stringB = $stringB\n"; = edit: = restrict to certain values of stringB: if($string =~ m|^(.*)/(.*\.pl)$|) { ($stringA,$stringB) = ($1,$2); print "stringA = $stringA\n"; print "stringB = $stringB\n"; }


1

cpan is configured to provide one setting to Makefile.PL, and Makefile.PL is picking up a conflicting setting from the environment. It looks like you use local::lib[1], which uses the INSTALL_BASE paradigm. As such, simply tell cpan to stop specifying PREFIX. From within the cpan shell, o conf makepl_arg '' o conf mbuildpl_arg '' o conf commit At the ...


1

It would help to have a more useful debugging message than oops. I would suggest writing a vbscript program that would give a more useful message. Is your version of Perl that you are running 32 or 64 bit? If it is 64-bit, then your program is failing because in-process servers (DLL OLE servers) have to have the same bit-ness as their clients. If that is ...


1

I don't think you're supposed to have infinite loops inside apps, I think you're supposed to only setup a recurring timer, and in that timer notify/message/write... See Plack::App::WebSocket - WebSocket server as a PSGI application and Re^4: real-time output from Mojolicious WebSockets?


1

The statement: use Some::Module qw(foo bar); is exactly equivalent to: BEGIN { require Some::Module; Some::Module->import( qw(foo bar) ); } in your case, the code for the My::Pack module has already been loaded, so you don't need to require it. Thus, you can just do: BEGIN { My::Pack->import( qw(pack_func) ) }



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