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6

The variable is not declared when the sub is being parsed. Either move the variable declaration before the sub, or pass the variable to the sub as a parameter. Update: You can't pass parameters to the wanted sub in File::Find directly. But, you can wrap it in an anonymous sub: sub parseSource { my $save_from_date = shift; # ... } # ... find( sub ...


5

sha1_hex is not a method. You want Digest::SHA::sha1_hex("test") Digest::SHA->sha1_hex("test") is basically equivalent to Digest::SHA->can('sha1_hex')->("Digest::SHA", "test") Notice the extra argument.


5

Remove the space character in front of the #! line. #!/bin/perl Not: #!/bin/perl


4

First off - as the comments say read this: http://perl.plover.com/varvarname.html The way to do this is with a hash. my %stuff; $stuff{'container0'} = "voila"; $stuff{'container1'} = "ssss"; $stuff{'container2'} = "swat"; my $value = int rand 3; my $ans = $stuff{'container'.$value}; print $ans,"\n"; (Needs to be 3 - int rand 2 will only ever give ...


4

The use of arrow notation in Digest::SHA->sha1_hex("test") causes the function call to be parsed as a method call on the package/class (same thing in Perl) Digest::SHA, which means that Perl will actually do Digest::SHA::sha1_hex('Digest::SHA', 'test'). To do what you want, write Digest::SHA::sha1_hex('test') instead.


3

Perl understand POSIX character classes in double brackets. So [^@[[:space:]]] is equivalent to [^@\s] (as long as [[:space:]] is the same as \s which I am not quite sure). Can you re-write the Perl regexp with POSIX character classes? Then it would be easier to go from one to the other.


3

You have to indicate with reading pipe -| that what follows is command which gets forked, open(my $fh, "-|", "cut -d= -f2 'webreader.conf'") or die $!; print <$fh>; # print output from command Better approach would be to read file directly by perl, open(my $fh, "<", "webreader.conf") or die $!; while (<$fh>) { my @F = split /=/; if ...


1

Here's a hint. my $num = int rand 3; will give you 0, 1, or 2, (pseudo-)randomly. If your values were stored in an array, you could then pick one with $array[$pick]. But your assignment is to use scalar variables, not an array. Can you figure out how to use scalars as a list?


1

I had to change the Process to launch like this: p.StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo(); p.StartInfo.WorkingDirectory = @"C:\Temp\"; p.StartInfo.FileName = @"C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe"; p.StartInfo.Arguments = @"C:\Temp\dirdupes.pl"; to get past problems launching the process. Perhaps that's not where you got hung up? After that, though, you ...


1

Catalyst::View::JSON isn't a plugin. Don't put it in your plugins list (the list after use Catalyst).


1

Your Perl script is running as a CGI, so it was run by fork+pipe+exec from an Apache child process (or some other HTTPD), which means it will have inherited signal handlers from the parent HTTP server process which are likely blocking or handling the signal. EDIT: Oops, I failed to notice you are using kill 0. This argument may not apply. Even so, anytime ...


1

There is an issue with terminology here, where the term "interpret" is used: What double-quotes do is called "interpolate". You can read about it here: http://perldoc.perl.org/perlop.html#Quote-and-Quote-like-Operators. This mostly supports some escape sequences and variable substitution. If you are looking to print "swat" in the case of $container2, ...


1

It depends what you want. If you want something a bit like a Unix shell, with built in commands like cd, and that will launch external programs like Firefox just by typing firefox, which you can then customize to add your own commands, then go with Zoidberg. If you want to start with a blank slate and create your own commands so that you have a shell that ...


1

The problem is that you never give $nextline a value: for my $cc22 (@file1list) { if ( $cc22 > $cds2 && $cc22 < $cds3 ) { if ($nextline) { ... } } } There's nowhere in that loop for $nextline to get set, so the if ($nextline) statement is never executed. To change that, you need ...


1

It's not an exception being thrown; it's a warning being printed. IO::Compress::Zlib::Extra contained the code for (my $ix = 0; $ix <= length(@$data) -1 ; $ix += 2) It was fixed in 2.042 (Nov 17th, 2011) for (my $ix = 0; $ix <= @$data -1 ; $ix += 2) The change log references tickets 72329 and 72505, the first of which shows what effect the bug ...


1

Use PDL::IO::Misc::rcols: Input data: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 code: use PDL; my $x = rcols( 'foo.dat', [] ); print $x; Result: % perl foo.pl [ [ 1 6] [ 2 7] [ 3 8] [ 4 9] [ 5 10] ]



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