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7

The syntax for the if statement is: if (CONDITION) BLOCK so if your condition is ($ARGV[0] eq "test") && ($ARGV[1] eq "test1") then you'd use if (($ARGV[0] eq "test") && ($ARGV[1] eq "test1")) { ... } That said, those parens are not needed because && is meant to be used exactly like that. if ($ARGV[0] eq "test" && ...


5

I wouldn't get too preoccupied with "using something like map" just for the sake of it. If you're having problems devising a solution that works that way then others are likely to have problems understanding what it does when you've managed to cram your foot into the slipper I believe this is clearest and simplest using a while iterator and each Like this ...


3

You can pass a reference to the variable to modify. sub increment { my ($ref) = @_; ++$$ref; } my $i = 0; say $i; # prints 0 increment(\$i); say $i; # prints 1 You could also take advantage of the fact that Perl passes by reference. sub increment { ++$_[0]; } my $i = 0; say $i; # prints 0 increment($i); say $i; # prints 1 But hiding ...


3

The string "0" is a false value in Perl, so this condition $Data = $handle->InputChar(1) is false when $handle->InputChar(1) returns the "0" string. Maybe a better check is whether the input does not match the empty string: while ((my $Data = $handle->InputChar(1)) ne "") { ...


3

It's best to use the URI module for manipulating URLs Here's an example that builds the hash %query from the query component of the URL I don't understand what you mean by "I want to count the id up and open it.". The value for the id parameter is in $query{id}, and is 123, but I can't imagine what counting it up might be I have used Data::Dump only to ...


3

Can't say that I would recommend doing it this way, but it is possible to do with a single map using a hash slice. my %color_map = (); # merica map { @color_map{ @{ $transform{ $_ } } } = ($_) x @{ $transform{ $_ } } } keys %transform;


2

The module caches the PID on module load. Fix it by performing the following post-fork: $MCE::Signal::main_proc_id = $$; Better yet, delay loading of MCE until after the fork. I'd do that by moving use MCE::Loop; use MCE::Signal '-setpgrp'; into a module (say Worker.pm), and by moving the child code into a sub named run in that same module, then ...


2

If the rest of your script is in Perl, I would strongly suggest replacing your calls to sed with a native implementation. For example, the replacements you have made using sed could be replaced with something like this: use strict; use warnings; for my $file (glob '*.csv') { open my $in, '<', $file; my @lines; while (<$in>) { ...


2

The problem is that the double quotes inside the sed argument are ending the Perl string. You need to escape them system("sed -i '/`"`",`"`"/d' *.csv"); Or you can use q(...). system(q(sed -i '/"",""/d' *.csv)); BTW, you can give multiple commands to sed, so you don't have to run it multiple times. system(q(sed -i -e '/"",""/d' -e '/___/d' -e '/---/d' ...


1

You may put these conditions inside of if-clause. if (($ARGV[0] eq "test") && ($ARGV[1] eq "test1")) { print"test and test1 Selected\n" } BTW, it's not important, logical conjunction would be written as and and it is generally preferred in Perl (like eq for ==). So ($ARGV[0] eq "test") and ($ARGV[1] eq "test1") is equivalent. However about ...


1

my @matches = $string =~ /[A-Z]{4}\d{4}/g;


2

Your code needs the statement my $filename; It does not currently contain that statement. It contains the following invalid statement instead: my @ids my $filename = 'ids.csv'; Perl even told you about it. syntax error at a.pl line 6, near "@ids my " Fix the first error first. Do so by adding the missing semi-colon.


1

Ignoring the interactive bits... here is how you can add the student to the class: #!/usr/bin/env perl use warnings; use strict; use Data::Dumper; my @classList = ( { courseName => 'Algebra', section => 101, students => [], }, { courseName => 'Geometry', section => 102, students ...


1

Thanks to @simbabque's comment I installed cpanm to the system perl, then used cpanm to install the perl module and it works: curl -L https://cpanmin.us | sudo perl - --sudo App::cpanminus sudo cpanm JSON I've not yet figured out the easiest way to install locally without using sudo. Edit: Without requiring sudo, using local::lib to setup $PERL5LIB paths ...


1

You need to dereference $var inside the subroutine, like this: my $x = 0; say $x; # prints 0 foo(\$x); say $x; # prints 1 sub foo { my $y = shift; $$y++; }


1

You can try forcing the dns resolution to ipv4 with Domain => AF_INET}, i.e.: my $smtp = Net::SMTP->new('FQDN', Timeout => 30, Domain => AF_INET, Debug => 1, ); If "Domain" is not given, AF_UNSPEC is assumed, that is, both ...


1

In your attempts to slurp the data into a single scalar, you are creating a single string when you want an array of IP addresses Something like this will work for you #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use JSON; my %data; my @files = glob '/home/jamie/store/inbound/threatfeeds/*_ip'; for my $file (@files) { open my $fh, '<', $file; ...


1

I suspect what you want is pretty_print: print to_json ( \%data, { 'pretty_print' => 1 } ); But can I also point out - it's thoroughly nasty to system cat. Perl has perfectly good open system calls. Especially as you basically do it twice and clobber your data in the process. Why are you trying to embed all of a file into a json structure as plain ...


1

I'd actually do it like this: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use Data::Dumper; my $url = "http://test.com/index.php?id=123&test=1&l=1"; my %param = $url =~ m/(\w+)\=(\w+)/g; print Dumper \%param; If you want to 'add an a to all parameters: $url =~ s/(\w+=\w+)/$1a/g;


1

The problem is almost certainly that $lines[0] has a newline at the end after being read from the file But there are several improvements you could make Always use strict and use warnings at the top of every Perl program, and declare all your variables using my as close as possible to their first point of use Use the three-parameter form of open and ...


1

The hash %trb must be declared before it is used. Move its definition up to before the while statement -- after your subroutine defintion and all will be well You appear to be more familiar with a different language, as you usually find Perl subroutines at the end of the program, but it doesn't matter either way


1

You are using the hash %trb in this line: my $val = $trb{"$type"}; before you have declared %trb here: my %trb = ( 0 => "reserved", 32 => "transfer event", 48 => "vendor defined"); Move that declaration of %trb up above the while loop.



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