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5

If want to produce the string ^.+|gg$ then you must use one of the following literals my $pat = '^.+|gg$'; my $pat = "^.+|gg\$"; Note that $ must be escaped in double-quoted string literals because $ marks the start of a variable to interpolate in double-quoted string literals. But it's simpler with qr, and it compiles the pattern for you. my $re = ...


5

In Perl the result of the expression may depend on its call context (e.g. scalar context, or array context, or void context). If you assign the value of the operator =~ to an array, that array will contain the values you need. @arr = ('abcd' =~ /(.)(.)(.)(.)/); Here @arr will contain exactly ($1, $2, $3, $4), i.e. ('a', 'b', 'c', 'd').


4

You could use a regex like: my @words = $line =~ /( (?:[^,+"']+|"[^"]*"|'[^']*')+ )/xg; But it'd likely be much cleaner to use Text::ParseWords: use strict; use warnings; use Text::ParseWords; my $line = 'print var1, "hello ,you "+var2'; my @words = parse_line( qr{,\s*|\+}, 0, $line ); use Data::Dump; dd @words; Outputs: ("print var1", "hello ...


3

$content is a hash reference, so you always need to use an arrow to access its contents. $content{items} would refer to a %content hash, which you don't have. That's where you're getting that "use of uninitialized value" error from.


2

Beginner's answer to beginner :) Sure not as profesional as should be, but maybe helps you. use strict; #use this all times use warnings; #this too - helps a lot! use JSON; my $json_str = ' { "items" : [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ] } '; my $content = decode_json($json_str); You wrote: My guess tells me that, once decoded, the object will be a hash with ...


2

You can try something like this: if ($s =~ /[^\P{Latin}A-Za-z]/) { # accented chars, do something } else { # No accented chars, do something else } \p{Latin} contains latin letters (including accented letters and characters like ç œ æ...). You can negate this class with an uppercase P: \P{Latin} *(that contains all characters except latin ...


2

Alternatively, you could do this using backtracking verbs. use strict; use warnings; use Data::Dumper; my $re = qr/(?:"[^"]*"|'[^']*')(*SKIP)(*F)|[,+]\s*/; my $str = 'print var1, "hello ,you "+var2'; my @res = split($re, $str); print Dumper \@res; Output $VAR1 = [ 'print var1', '"hello ,you "', 'var2' ];


2

This might work for you (GNU sed): sed -r '20,500{N;s/^(.*)(\n)/\2\1 /;D}' file or perhaps more readably: sed ':a;20,500{N;s/\n/ /;ta}' file


1

Dunno what you call efficient or elegant, but this seems to be what you want: sort -n -k1,3 file.txt | rev | uniq -f 2 | rev


1

override in Mason implements the method modifier override in Moose; Moose's override is syntactic sugar for the standard OO method for overriding a parent method, but with some restrictions if the method takes arguments. From the Moose docs for override: override 'display_name' => sub { my $self = shift; return super() . q{, } . ...


1

That is part of HTTP content negotiation. You'll need to use LWP::UserAgent to specify the appropriate headers with the request.


1

The below regex would match white spaces but not of a new line character. (?:(?!\n)\s) DEMO If you want to add carriage return also then add \r with the | operator inside the negative lookahead. (?:(?![\n\r])\s) DEMO Add + after the non-capturing group to match one or more white spaces. (?:(?![\n\r])\s)+ DEMO


1

Here's an example of how you should do it: $variable =~ /(find something)/; If you want to assign a pattern to a variable, here's how you could do it: my $pattern = qr"patern"; my $content = "content"; my @results = $content =~ m/($pattern)/; You'll need, indeed, to escape every special characters.


1

Not sure what the some command is, but you should send "some command\n" because telnet will not send your command until you press Enter. Also, if the send call is the last in your script (as in the example), it may exit before it sent it, so either put a sleep call after the last send, or close the expect properly with soft_close.


1

Using a perl one-liner to strip the newline: perl -i -pe 'chomp if 20..500' file Or to replace it with a space: perl -i -pe 's/\R/ / if 20..500' file Explanation: Switches: -i: Edit <> files in place (makes backup if extension supplied) -p: Creates a while(<>){...; print} loop for each “line” in your input file. -e: Tells ...


1

You don't need to use the eval block or do anything fancy to ensure that the mail has been sent; that is what last_send_successful is for. When the send subroutine successfully completes its work, it sets an internal variable ($object->{last_send_successful}); this is what the last_send_successful sub is checking. It is usually not necessary to use an ...



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