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6

This might work for you (GNU sed): sed 'H;/pattern/h;$!d;x;//!d' file Stashes the last pattern and following lines in the hold space and at end-of-file prints them out. Or using the same method in awk: awk '{x=x ORS $0};/pattern/{x=$0};END{if(x ~ //)print x}' file However on my machine jaypals way with sed seems to be the quickest: tac file | sed ...


5

Reverse the file, print until the first pattern, exit and reverse the file. tac file | awk '/pattern/{print;exit}1' | tac


4

You can instead collect them in a hash: use strict; use warnings; my $retval = <<HERE; Black Scholes NVol = 1.19711 Black Scholes NDelta = 0.0494522 Black Scholes NGamma = 0.42176 Black Scholes NTheta = -0.302207 Black Scholes NVega = 0.0207006 Black Scholes Vol = 0.0108141 Black Scholes Delta = 0.049565 Black Scholes Gamma = 0.42329 Black Scholes ...


3

When [] follows another index, it implies a dereference. $foo[...][...] means $foo[...]->[...] When () follows another index, it implies a dereference. $foo[...](...) means $foo[...]->(...) As such, it's very reasonable for people to expect foo(...)[...] to mean foo(...)->[...] rather than ( foo(...) )[0] That divergence in ...


3

Just add logic to your img src: <img src="/images/icons/mail<%= @post_regular ? 2 : 1 %>.png" /> Similar functionality can be used to adjust the styling, but I'd probably recommend injecting a secondary class to set the background color instead of hardcoding the style.


3

The macro setq-local was introduced in Emacs 24.3, so this version of perl-mode is too new for the Emacs you're currently running (24.1). You could upgrade Emacs, or you could just put the definition of setq-local into your .emacs (from here): (defmacro setq-local (var val) "Set variable VAR to value VAL in current buffer." ;; Can't use backquote here, ...


2

I have just had a look at the AI::Categorizer bundle and the included demo.pl file has a hardcoded shebang of #!/usr/bin/perl so I believe it is trying to use the system perl. Assuming you haven't already tried changing this line (the first line of demo.pl) to point at /opt/local/bin/perl then I suspect doing so will fix your problem. You might also ...


2

%{ } is a hash dereference; what's inside it is a reference to a hash, and the contents of that hash are being assigned to %oneobs. See http://perlmonks.org/?node=References+quick+reference


2

The short answer is you can't. Since Perl is a dynamic language, you can't check whether you load all modules before runtime as you can't check whether there are some other bugs in your code. You still can use some static code analysis, trying to find This::Pattern in files where use This::Pattern; is not presented, but it doesn't guarantee anything.


2

Here's a Perlish way to do it: perl -ne '$seen = 1, @a = () if /pattern/; push @a, $_; END { print @a if $seen }' file


2

Please make sure, that you use at least version 6.06 of LWP::UserAgent and version 6.06 of LWP::Protocol::https. Any versions before do not have proper support for https proxy, at least not when using IO::Socket::SSL as the underlying SSL library. To get the versions you are running: use LWP::UserAgent; use LWP::Protocol::https; print "LWP::UserAgent: ...


2

You don't need to escape hyphen when it is outside the character class. In the character class, you must place the hypen at the start or at the last. But if you place it in the middle, escaping may work or maynot.


2

run() will not return until every session has ended. This includes sessions that were created while run() was running. Define the constant POE::Kernel::TRACE_REFCNT before using the first POE module, and you will receive a dump of which resources are in use throughout your program's lifetime. #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; sub POE::Kernel::TRACE_REFCNT () { ...


1

With the limited information you have offered it is hard to write a comprehensive solution, but here is something that uses XML::Twig to process the XML data you have shown and display all (one) path elements that don't have a kind attribute equal to dir. XML::LibXML is also a very high quality module based on the C-coded libxml2 use strict; use warnings; ...


1

Only documents like PDF or png can be downloaded directly. Google Drive Documents like spreadsheets or (text) documents need to be exported into one of the available formats. Check for "exportLinks" on a file given. Source


1

First of all you should put the text returned by the backticks imp_val ... into an array instead of a scalar. That will split it into lines and make it much easier to handle. Then you can process it into a hash using just map with a regular expression. It looks like this. Note that I have used Data::Dump and dd only to demonstrate the resulting hash ...


1

cpan is just not in your environment, see that answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4493004/1102638


1

Yes, that works perfectly. Besides @Miller's comment, I'd recommend you to also pass the $socket, $user and $pass as parameters to your function instead of using them from context: my $client = create_client_object($socket, $user, $pass); sub create_client_object { my ($socket, $user, $pass) = @_; my $client = Mail::IMAPClient->new( Socket ...


1

Simplest solution is just to use a regex matching on the entire file: perl -0777 -ne 'print $1 if /pattern(.*?)$/' file


1

A standalone awk: awk '/pattern/{delete a;c=0}{a[c++]=$0}END{for (i=0;i<c;i++){print a[i]}}' file


1

my @obs; is an array which contains hash reference at each index. run_regression("bivariate regression", $obshashptr->{someY}, [ "const", "someX" ] ); This calls the run_regression subroutine and passes 3 arguments. Now check the subroutine. sub run_regression { my $reg = Statistics::Regression->new( $_[0], $_[2] ); foreach my $obshashptr ...



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