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5

You can use XML::XSH2, a wrapper around XML::LibXML: open file.xml ; set /ROOT/TESTING[INSTANCE]/INSTANCE/PHY/@FREQ 42 ; save :f newname.xml ;


4

This will do as you ask. I've changed $slash_string to be a word, followed by zero or more occurrences of a slash followed by another word. I've also taken the + quantifier off your ($slash_string)+ (because we only want one sequence of slash-separated words here) and added the /x modifier so that the patterns can be made more readable by adding ...


3

From perldoc autouse autouse - postpone load of modules until a function is used If the module Module is already loaded, then the declaration use autouse 'Module' => qw(func1 func2($;$)); is equivalent to use Module qw(func1 func2);


3

I am assuming you want to replace the string inside the files found by find. Command example below will change in-place (-i) any "foo" with "bar" for all *.txt files from curent directory. find . -type f -name '*.txt' -print0 | xargs -0 perl -p -i -e 's/foo/bar/g;' And for your question, you should be able to get it with this command: find . -type f ...


3

qq(something) is just another way to say "something" while q(something) means 'something'. The difference between "this" and 'this' is interpolation, which is enabled only inside double quotes. my $foo = 123; print "<< $foo >>"; # prints << 123 >> print '<< $foo >>'; # prints << $foo >> So, since $ is not ...


3

If you just want to add to an epoch time and get another epoch time, just do: 1372252864.901871 + .0867 If you are doing something else, no, localtime does not preserve fractional seconds. You probably want to use DateTime to deal with fractional seconds: use DateTime; my $time = DateTime->from_epoch(epoch=>1372252864.901871, ...


2

You don't assign anything to $tokpos. The assignment is part of a comment - syntax highlighting in your editor should've told you. strict would've told you, too. Also, you should probably use $prevtokpos in the division: $tokpos is the new value that you haven't met before. To get the output for the last token, you have to process it outside the loop, as ...


2

Two splits might make it easier for you: my ($transcriptID, $rest) = split(/\|/, $line, 2); my ($isoform, $deseq) = split (/_DESeq/, $rest, 2); $deseq = "_DESeq$deseq"; Transforms: "TR10052|c9_g13_i6_DESeqResultsBacterialen=248 gi|497816164|ref|WP_010130320.1| 97.56 82 2 0 1 246 9 90 7e-51 167" Into: "TR10052", "c9_g13_i6", ...


2

Use a negative look ahead to split on underscores that are not followed by "letter digit". Try splitting on this regex: /\||\_(?![a-z]\d)|\s+/ See live regex demo matching the desired characters on which to split.


2

Add the newline character to your delimiter. Change: $/ = " ."; to: $/ = " .\n"; And if you want to remove the delimiter, you can chomp. while(<FH>) { chomp; push (@msgarray, $_); }


2

rename -n `s/${line}.mp4/${e}.mp4/` *.mp4 should be mv "${line}.mp4" "${e}.mp4"


2

If List::MoreUtils qualifies as one of Perl's "default tools" as you say in a comment, Math::Geometry::Planar should qualify as well. Math::Geometry::Planar provides a number of handy functions for calculating the intersection of segments, rays, and lines, as well as functions for manipulating polygons, calculating distances, and other goodies. When ...


2

Replace if (prompt_yn("Do you want to start a process")){ with while (prompt_yn("Do you want to start a process")){ ?


2

This is one alternative solution. The code in the question calculates the value of $k every iteration, that's way too often, since you'll only need it if you want to store the value in one of the return arrays. This code loops over the indices from 0 to $#x-1 and makes use of the fact that the index is always stored in $_. This way, you some sort of lazy ...


2

Your problem isn't the print, it's that $message contains CRLF line endings. In a regex, . matches any character that is not LF (which means it matches CR). When you print the CR, the cursor goes back to the left margin, causing subsequent text to overwrite what you've already printed. You don't see this when you print the variables individually, because ...


2

If the count of the spaces around the / isn't matter, the problem can be reduced to split at spaces. The logic: replace all \s*/\s* with only the / - e.g. from the word1 / word2 / word3 you will get word1/word2/word3 spit the string at the spaces into 3 parts replace each / back to / code while(<DATA>) { chomp; s!\s*/\s*!/!g; #remove all ...


2

Use Path::Tiny: #!/usr/bin/perl use warnings; use strict; use feature qw{ say }; use Path::Tiny; for my $path (qw( ../dira/dirb/*.txt dira/dirb/dirc/.../dirn/test.pl )) { my $path_o = 'Path::Tiny'->new($path); my $basename = $path_o->basename; my $dirname = $path_o->dirname; $dirname =~ s=/$==; ...


1

You can use File::Basename functions to parse file paths: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use File::Basename; my $string = "../dira/dirb/*.txt"; my $stringA = dirname($string); my $stringB = basename($string); printf "String A: %-25sString B: %s\n", $stringA, $stringB; $string = "dira/dirb/dirc/.../dirn/test.pl"; $stringA = ...


1

Those are alternative ways of delimiting the regex. Whomever wrote that code chose to use something else for personal reasons or, possibly, for code readability. Often, if patterns are often going to involve /, something else will be chosen to avoid having to escape the slash character in the regex. This answer provides more information.


1

There is nothing wrong with your version statement. The problem is that you have not declared the variable $data. This works: use 5.11.0; my $data = 1232; print $data; This is more explicit, maybe more "understandable": use 5.11.0; my $data; # declare the local variable we are about to use $data = 1232; # set initial value print $data; # see if ...


1

use always runs in compile time. But require doesn't. So you can use require Module; just before any function call. Of course, the module will be loaded only the first time require is executed (and stay loaded). Mind that use also calls import on the loaded module and you may want to do that too. use Module qw(f1 f2) is a compile-time version of require ...


1

I'd use Perl for its recursive regexes. We can use them to match a brace-enclosed block, from an opening brace to the corresponding closing brace. For example: perl -i -0777 -pe 's/zone\s*"example.net"\s*(\{([^{}]|(?1))*\});\s*//g' foo.conf The tricky part of the regex is (\{([^{}]|(?1))*\}). This is captured as capturing group 1 and referenced ...


1

That zone file obeys the syntax of Tcl, so we can define a procedure named "zone" and read the zone file as if it's a Tcl script: #!/usr/bin/env tclsh lassign $argv domain_to_remove zone_file proc zone {domain body} { if {$domain ne $::domain_to_remove} { puts [format {zone "%s" {%s}} $domain $body] } } source $zone_file and then $ tclsh ...


1

I always try to keep the list of modules and other external dependencies as low as possible. This will also work: use strict; use warnings; my @a = qw(1 3 5 7 9); my $b = 0; map {$b += $_} @a; print "b=$b.\n"; map executes the block for each element of the list, setting $_ in turn to each element. You could also use grep, the difference is that map ...


1

This combines your two scripts into one and checks whether a $match from @matches exists in the %issues hash built up from the $inputfile file handle that is pointing at "INPUTFILE.txt". I have changed the variable names in the open somewhat since the capitalized file names seemed like old style file handles: #!perl -l my $inputfile = "INPUTFILE.txt"; my ...


1

you can try something like this: $string =~ m|^(.*)/(.*)$|; ($stringA,$stringB) = ($1,$2); print "stringA = $stringA\n"; print "stringB = $stringB\n"; = edit: = restrict to certain values of stringB: if($string =~ m|^(.*)/(.*\.pl)$|) { ($stringA,$stringB) = ($1,$2); print "stringA = $stringA\n"; print "stringB = $stringB\n"; }


1

The problem with setting $/ = " ." is that the lines you read will end at that closing dot, and the following line will start with the newline character after it. That means none of your lines except possibly the first will start with "ERROR" - they will start with "\nERROR" instead, and so your test will always fail There are some other issues with your ...



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