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0

It depends what you want. If you want something a bit like a Unix shell, with built in commands like cd, and that will launch external programs like Firefox just by typing firefox, which you can then customize to add your own commands, then go with Zoidberg. If you want to start with a blank slate and create your own commands so that you have a shell that ...


0

Perl understand POSIX character classes in double brackets. So [^@[[:space:]]] is equivalent to [^@\s] (as long as [[:space:]] is the same as \s which I am not quite sure). Can you re-write the Perl regexp with POSIX character classes? Then it would be easier to go from one to the other.


0

For a Cross Platform Compatible Perl solution, I would recommend either of the following two modules. Path::Class #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use Path::Class; my $dir = dir('/Users/miller/devel'); for my $child ( $dir->children ) { next if $child->is_dir || ( time - $child->stat->mtime ) < 60 * 60 * 24 * 30; # ...


0

This regex also matches newline \n and carriage return \r characters. (?![ \t\f])\s DEMO To match one or more newline or carriage return characters, you could use the below regex. (?:(?![ \t\f])\s)+ DEMO


2

In your perl code, you are enclosing the commands for perl to run in double quotes instead of single quotes; shells treat the two quite differently, and unless you are using shell variables, you should stick to single quotes. Revert to single quotes, and escape the $'s that you don't intent your perl script to interpolate: my $cmd3 = "samtools view ...


4

You need to escape the variables in your perl command so they aren't interpolated: my $cmd3 = qq{samtools view $file.bam | perl -ne "if (\$_ =~ m/NM:i:(\\d+)/) {print \$1, 'chr(10)'}" > $file.nm}; # ^ ^ However, I would recommend against spawning a new perl process, since ...


0

This is very close to a problem from yesterday: rearrange data from one column to a row The main difference is that yours is output into a table using Text::Table versus a csv. I've also added the use of Sort::Key::Natural qw(natsort) in case the there are more than just single digit column or rows, ie. sp10 comes after sp9. use strict; use warnings; use ...


1

At the end of your first loop, the file pointer is at the end of the file. You have to bring it back to beginning if you need another round. You can try either to rewind the file: seek(asterisk_Output,0,1); or (if your logic allows it) to change foreach and while (so that you only read it once): while (my $line = <asterisk_Output>){ foreach ...


0

You can simplify your program a fair bit, and deal with the spn/An combinations that are 0 at the printing stage. Here's a demonstration of simpler code that will do the same thing. I've put comments in the code to explain -- obviously you won't need them in your production code, so feel free to delete them! #!/usr/bin/perl use warnings ; use strict ; open ...


0

Please follow these steps: Configure your web server to run Perl script (you may follow this url for more info http://editrocket.com/articles/perl_apache_windows.html). Create your file (perl script ) and save it in your cgi-bin directory under root xampp. (i.e : C:\xampp\cgi-bin). N.B : your file should contain header info like print ...


1

You can also use zero-width delimiter, which can be described as split string at places which are in front of 5 chars (by using \K positive look behind) my @mkh = split (/.{5}\K/, $_);


0

You simply need to use $. and a state variable to keep track of the last line that /raman/ was seen on. The following demonstrates with some test data: use strict; use warnings; use autodie; # open my $fh, '+<', $reference_file; my $fh = \*DATA; my $last_raman = -1e8; while (<$fh>) { $last_raman = $. if /raman/; s/bad/good/ if ($. - ...


0

Fix the first error first. A missing quote is causing Perl to see open(my $infile, "..."Extracting " . $entry->{'name'} . "\n";


2

Debug using Data::Dump To observe exactly what your split operation is doing, use a module like Data::Dump: use warnings; use strict; while (<DATA>) { my @mkh = split /(.{5})/; use Data::Dump; dd @mkh; } __DATA__ aaaaabbbbbcccccdddddfffff Outputs: ("", "aaaaa", "", "bbbbb", "", "ccccc", "", "ddddd", "", "fffff", "\n") As you can ...


0

As the compiler is saying you have sql syntax error, in your program, there is a syntax error. your query : Insert into FIR (name,desig,dept,date1,cname,cnum,im,date2,other,desc,root,dqi,rc,strat) values(?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?) There should be no space between table name and the bracket.so the correct query is: Insert into ...


5

The first argument in split is the pattern to split on, i.e. it describes what separates your fields. If you put capturing groups in there (as you do), those will be added to the output of the split as specified in the split docs (last paragraph). This isn't what you want - your separator isn't a group of five characters. You're looking to split a string ...


0

Install xampp. during installation, Make sure that, you have checked perl to be installed. I assumed that, you have installed xampp in c:/xampp directory. Now go to c:/xampp/htdocs directory. Inside htdocs directory create a directory perl. No inside the perl, make a file named hello.cgi . In hello.cgi write the following code snippet. hello world ...


2

You need to install "libjpeg-dev", sudo apt-get install libjpeg-dev


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The correct code is: #!C:\xampp\perl\bin\perl.exe # The above line is perl execution path in xampp # The below line tells the browser, that this script will send html content. # If you miss this line then it will show "malformed header from script" error. print "Content-ype: text/html\n\n"; print "Hello world." In xampp the perl execution path is ...


1

Start with: INSERT INTO rig (Name, Model,Type) values (x,y,z) WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM rig where Name=x AND Model=y AND Type=z); Be aware that if the record already exists the value you get for last_insert_id won't make any sense. You would be better served by putting a unique key on x,y,z and using insert ignore.. though that ...


0

And if you want those commas in the output, try awk '{if(b[$1])b[$1] = b[$1]", "; b[$1] = b[$1] $2 $3}; END{for(i in b)print i, b[i]}' or the slightly terser awk '{b[$1]=b[$1](b[$1]?", ":"")$2$3}END{for(i in b)print i,b[i]}' output Input1 file1:45764, file1:878755, file1:899787 Input2 file1:45676, file1:769678, file1:6454764


1

There are known problems in some releases of JSON::PP which cause problems further up the toolchain like this. Try upgrading JSON::PP. If the toolchain issues prevent you from installing JSON::PP in the normal way, then download the latest version of the module from CPAN, and manually replace the JSON/PP.pm file on your system.


1

awk '{b[$1]=b[$1] $2$3" "}END{for (i in b) print i,b[i]}' inputFile will produce output as Input1 file1:45764 file1:878755 file1:899787 Input2 file1:45676 file1:769678 file1:6454764 what it does? {b[$1]=b[$1] $2$3" "} creates an array b appends the second and third column(since there was some spaces betweenfile and value in your example).$2$3 ...


2

From the documentation: perms The perms option sets the permissions of newly-created files. This value is modified by your process's umask and defaults to 0666 (same as sysopen). Note the word "newly-created". This behaviour is not dictated by the module, but by the core sysopen. From the source of File::Slurp: my $perms = ...


0

shell: perl sort.pl "$filename" perl: my $filename = shift @ARGV;


0

You just need to keep track of your columns and row data when parsing the data structure. The following demonstrates: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; my $fh = \*DATA; my %columns; my %rows; while (<$fh>) { chomp; my ( $company, $col, $vals ) = split ',', $_, 3; # Track Columns for later labeling $columns{$col}++; ...


0

The following code will do the job; rather than using several hashes, I've put all the data in a hash of hashes. I've put comments in the script to explain what is happening in case you are not sure. You can, of course, delete them in your script. #!/usr/bin/perl use warnings; use strict; my %market; while (<DATA>) { next unless /\w/; # ...


0

Perl doesn't have or lack it any more than C does. The C preprocessor was designed such that it and C need to know as little as possible about each other. There is no reason why you can't use it with Perl. So why don't Perl programmers do it? As codenhein explains, it's generally a bad idea to use an include mechanism with a compiler that don't know ...


1

To increase the scope of a variable beyond a certain block, you need to move its declaration outside of that block, like so: my ($question1, $question2); # both are now initialized to undef foreach my $line (split /:/, $test) { my $match1 = "1"; my $match2 = "2"; if ($line =~ /$match1/) { $question1 = $line; # NOT declaring ...


1

Easier way is 'not with perl'. find /files/axis -mtime +30 -type f -exec rm {} \;


0

Finally, I was able to fix this problem. As I understand, the whole problem was in installation of different parts of Perl in different folders. For example, I had /root/perl5 folder and /home/user1/perl5 folder.I was not able to install modules as a non-root user. I had to switch to root any time, I was installing any module. Then I had to switch back to ...


0

I'd replace your opendir code segment with glob. E.g. for my $filename ( glob("$calls_dir/*.html") ) { open( my $filehandle, "<", $filename ) or die $!; while (<$filehandle>) { # do stuff } } Also - you're testing a pattern - to see if the pattern matches. Then - adding it to a hash. Then iterating each key of the hash. ...


3

Certainly in this case, the brackets aren't necessary. They're not strictly wrong in the sense that they do do what the author intends. As with so much in Perl, there's more than one way to do it. So there's the underlying question: why did the author choose to do this this way? I wondered at first whether it was the author's preferred style: perhaps he ...


2

This will do as you ask. It uses opendir/readdir to list the directory. stat fetches all the necessary information, and subsequent -f _ and -M _ calls check whether the item is a file and older than thirty days without repeating the stat call. use strict; use warnings; use 5.010; use autodie; no autodie 'unlink'; use File::Spec::Functions 'catfile'; use ...


2

You're quite correct. It's redundant. It doesn't make any difference in this case, because you're effectively forcing a list context to list context operation. E.g. my ( $square ) = ( $_ * $_ ); Which also produces the same result. So - in this case, doesn't matter. But is generally speaking not good coding style.


0

You can do the line reading and writing at the same time, and store the previous line in a variable. See the code comments for an explanation of what is happening: my $prev; while (<$FH_IN>) { next unless /\w/; # make sure the lines have some content # remove the line endings chomp; # chop off the first 6 characters (the base numbers) ...


0

How about: s/(^|\n)([^\n]{60})\n/$1$2/g In action: use strict; use warnings; use 5.014; my $str = q/agatggcggcgctgaggggtcttgggggctctaggccggccacctactggtttgcagcgg agacgacgcatggggcctgcgcaataggagtacgctgcctgggaggcgtgactagaagcg gaagtagttgtgggcgcctttgcaaccgcctgggacgccgccgagtggtctgtgcaggtt cgcgggtcgctggcgggggtcgtgagggagtgcgccgggagcggagatatggagggagat ...


0

I've got to be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure I understand your question. It seems to be what you're asking has more to do with DBIx::Class than Catalyst--the latter I know very little about, the former I am learning more about every day. With that in mind, here's my best attempt at answering your question. I am using Mojolicious as the MVC, since ...


2

Not all days have 24 hours, so 14 days is not always 336 hours. If you want the difference in hours, you'll have to specifically ask for that (or in something that can be converted to hours such as minutes). delta_ms is the method to do that. my $now = DateTime->new(day => 17, month=> 10, year ...


0

Ok, thank everyone, especially @Borodin and @Miller for your effort! Here is the fully working example (based on the 2nd solution from @Borodin): Directory tree: . ├── lib │ ├── Child.pm │ └── Parent.pm ├── main.pl └── MyProject.komodoproject main.pl: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use lib::Child; my $child = lib::Child->new({ ...


0

I have access only to a Windows system at present, which means I was getting problems with the clash between your Parent module and the core parent pragma. I have changed the name to Father, and I suggest you install these files on your own system all in the same directory and work from there. Then at least we will both know where you are! It looks like ...


0

lib should just be a library directory, and not actually part of the package names. The following is how I would rework your files: main.pl #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use FindBin; use lib "$FindBin::Bin/lib"; use Child; lib/Parent.pm package Parent; use strict; use warnings; sub new { my ($class, $arg_for) = @_; my $self ...


1

The major problem is that you are confusing yourself by putting the modules in the lib directory. This works partially because the current directory . appears in @ISA, so Perl will look there for the modules. But lib/Child.pm starts with use Parent; package lib::Child; @ISA = qw(Parent); which uses the wrong names for the packages. This should be package ...


0

Your bug was because you were embedding file processing, so your inner loop only went through the file's contents a single time and then was stuck at eof. The easiest solution is just to load the inner loop file entirely into memory first. The following demonstrates using more Modern Perl techniques: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use autodie; ...


7

Perl already has require, do, eval and here documents among other things. It doesn't need a builtin preprocessor, if you need one that badly, there are filters. http://perldoc.perl.org/perlfilter.html In general, nobody wants #include, even C and C++ programmers would mostly be happy to give it up in exchange for: Faster compiles Clean module system ...


0

"use Carp" and play with the various routines and you also get a stack - not sure if this way is better or worse than the "caller" method suggested by cnd. I have used the LINE and FILE variables (and probably other similar variables) in C and Perl to show where I got in the code and other information when debugging but have seen little value outside a ...


1

Let's talk about Perl regex. Let's assume you need to be able to extract the following substrings: 12 h, 54 min, 11 s, # you have a trailing comma in your example 1 h, 54 min, 11 s, 54 min, 11 s, 4 min, 11 s, 55 s, and so on. We will need some building blocks: \d: any digit ?: when appended to something (a character, a meta-character like \d or a group ...


1

echo "12 h, 3 min, 56 s," | tr -cd "0-9 " Output: 12 3 56 echo "12 h, 3 min, 56 s," | tr "," "\n" | awk '/h/ {print $1}' 12 echo "12 h, 3 min, 56 s," | tr "," "\n" | awk '/min/ {print $1}' 3 echo "12 h, 3 min, 56 s," | tr "," "\n" | awk '/s/ {print $1}' 56


1

Try this (Perl): my @matches = "1 h, 30 min, 15 s" =~ /(\d{1,2}) [hms]/g; Or a bit stricter my @matches = "1 h, 30 min, 15 s" =~ /(\d{1,2}) (?:h|min|s)/g; if(scalar @matches == 3) { my ($h, $mi, $s) = @matches; print "$h : $mi : $s\n"; }


0

I have no idea what your code has to do with your question. I'll just answer the question. The following is a solution that doesn't store the result in memory. my @x1 = (1, 2, 3); my @x2 = (2, 3, 4); for my $x1 (@x1) { for my $x2 (@x2) { print("$x1-$x2 = ", $x1-$x2, "\n"); } } Or if you want an iterator, use Algorithm::Loops qw( NestedLoops ...



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