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0

It seems that you are referring to both the "web-address" as well as actual "content" on the page. I think its more about your approach that you need to fix. If an URL is in non-english, it still points to the same IP-ADDRESS if its a valid web-address. So just write a function to detect language and convert the address to its IP-Address. If its about ...


1

Alternatively, you could do this using backtracking verbs. use strict; use warnings; use Data::Dumper; my $re = qr/(?:"[^"]*"|'[^']*')(*SKIP)(*F)|[,+]\s*/; my $str = 'print var1, "hello ,you "+var2'; my @res = split($re, $str); print Dumper \@res; Output $VAR1 = [ 'print var1', '"hello ,you "', 'var2' ];


2

You could use a regex like: my @words = $line =~ /( (?:[^,+"']+|"[^"]*"|'[^']*')+ )/xg; But it'd likely be much cleaner to use Text::ParseWords: use strict; use warnings; use Text::ParseWords; my $line = 'print var1, "hello ,you "+var2'; my @words = parse_line( qr{,\s*|\+}, 0, $line ); use Data::Dump; dd @words; Outputs: ("print var1", "hello ...


0

Your hash is backwards. You want to lookup group name by host name. Change $programs{$groupname} = $hostname; to $groupname{$_} = $groupname for split ' ', $hostname; Then the bottom part becomes my $hostname = ( split /\t/ )[0]; print $fh3 $_ . "\t" . ( $groupname{$hostname} || '*NA*' ) . "\n";


-1

I did it by using the following regex expression: my ($year, $month, $day, $hour, $min, $sec) = $get_time =~ /(\d\d\d\d)-(\d?\d)-(\d\d)T(\d\d):(\d\d):(\d\d)/;


0

Normalize your data Use Text::CSV to reorder the columns of your CSV file. Then you can use Perl’s sort or some other utility to reorder the rows of your files. This also uses Text::Wrap to display the normalized files in a pleasing format: use strict; use warnings; use autodie; # Setup fake data my @files; { local $/ = ''; # Paragraph ...


0

That is part of HTTP content negotiation. You'll need to use LWP::UserAgent to specify the appropriate headers with the request.


1

The below regex would match white spaces but not of a new line character. (?:(?!\n)\s) DEMO If you want to add carriage return also then add \r with the | operator inside the negative lookahead. (?:(?![\n\r])\s) DEMO Add + after the non-capturing group to match one or more white spaces. (?:(?![\n\r])\s)+ DEMO


4

If want to produce the string ^.+|gg$ then you must use one of the following literals my $pat = '^.+|gg$'; my $pat = "^.+|gg\$"; Note that $ must be escaped in double-quoted string literals because $ marks the start of a variable to interpolate in double-quoted string literals. But it's simpler with qr, and it compiles the pattern for you. my $re = ...


0

There is a trailing slash in your XPath, that you need to remove my $price_day = $tree->find('.//*[@id="price_amount"]'); However, from my own testing, I believe that HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath is also having trouble parsing that specific URL. Perhaps because of the conditional comments? As an alternative approach, I would recommend using ...


1

Here's an example of how you should do it: $variable =~ /(find something)/; If you want to assign a pattern to a variable, here's how you could do it: my $pattern = qr"patern"; my $content = "content"; my @results = $content =~ m/($pattern)/; You'll need, indeed, to escape every special characters.


2

Beginner's answer to beginner :) Sure not as profesional as should be, but maybe helps you. use strict; #use this all times use warnings; #this too - helps a lot! use JSON; my $json_str = ' { "items" : [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ] } '; my $content = decode_json($json_str); You wrote: My guess tells me that, once decoded, the object will be a hash with ...


2

You can try something like this: if ($s =~ /[^\P{Latin}A-Za-z]/) { # accented chars, do something } else { # No accented chars, do something else } \p{Latin} contains latin letters (including accented letters and characters like ç œ æ...). You can negate this class with an uppercase P: \P{Latin} *(that contains all characters except latin ...


0

I don't understand why you dislike the arrow operator so much! The decode_json function from the JSON module will always return a data reference. Suppose you have a Perl program like this use strict; use warnings; use JSON; my $json_data = '{ "items": [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ] }'; my $content = decode_json($json_data); use Data::Dump; dd $content; which ...


0

The date in the output file is set to 0 initially, and then gets parsed from named.stats in this line of the script: if (/^\+{3} Statistics Dump \+{3}\s+\((\d+)\)/) { $date = $1; $flag = 1; %RESULT = (); } The date and time are recorded in named.stats in Unix time, the number of seconds after Jan 1st 1970. If, for some reason, that line of the stats file ...


0

I actually asked a similar question here The answer: In Perl, a function can only really return a scalar or a list. Since hashes can be initialized or assigned from lists (e.g. %foo = (a => 1, b => 2)), I guess you're asking why json_decode returns something like { a => 1, b => 2 } (a reference to an anonymous hash) rather than (a => 1, b => 2) (a ...


-1

The CGI script doesn't receive the HTTP request. If you want to dump the form data received by a CGI script, you can use the following: use CGI qw( ); use Data::Dumper qw( Dumper ); my $cgi = CGI->new(); my %form; for my $param ($cgi->param()) { $form{$param} = [ $cgi->param($param) ]; } print($cgi->header('text/plain')); local ...


1

Using a perl one-liner to strip the newline: perl -i -pe 'chomp if 20..500' file Or to replace it with a space: perl -i -pe 's/\R/ / if 20..500' file Explanation: Switches: -i: Edit <> files in place (makes backup if extension supplied) -p: Creates a while(<>){...; print} loop for each “line” in your input file. -e: Tells ...


-1

As @atycnth has already pointed out, the array your searching for is returned by the regular expression match in a list context. Here is your code expanded with this method added: use strict; use warnings; # Fake Data my $fake_data = join '', ( 'A' .. 'Z' ) x 10; # Build a random Regular Expression my $pattern = join '', map { '(.{' . int( 2 + rand 3 ) . ...


1

You don't need to use the eval block or do anything fancy to ensure that the mail has been sent; that is what last_send_successful is for. When the send subroutine successfully completes its work, it sets an internal variable ($object->{last_send_successful}); this is what the last_send_successful sub is checking. It is usually not necessary to use an ...


5

In Perl the result of the expression may depend on its call context (e.g. scalar context, or array context, or void context). If you assign the value of the operator =~ to an array, that array will contain the values you need. @arr = ('abcd' =~ /(.)(.)(.)(.)/); Here @arr will contain exactly ($1, $2, $3, $4), i.e. ('a', 'b', 'c', 'd').


3

$content is a hash reference, so you always need to use an arrow to access its contents. $content{items} would refer to a %content hash, which you don't have. That's where you're getting that "use of uninitialized value" error from.


0

Not sure what the some command is, but you should send "some command\n" because telnet will not send your command until you press Enter. Also, if the send call is the last in your script (as in the example), it may exit before it sent it, so either put a sleep call after the last send, or close the expect properly with soft_close.


2

This might work for you (GNU sed): sed -r '20,500{N;s/^(.*)(\n)/\2\1 /;D}' file or perhaps more readably: sed ':a;20,500{N;s/\n/ /;ta}' file


0

#!/usr/bin/perl $str = 'IP address is : 70.21.311.105'; if ($str =~ m/(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})/) { if ($1 <= 255 && $2 <= 255 && $3 <= 255 && $4 <= 255 ) { print "Valid $str\n"; } else { print "invalid IP $str\n"; } } __END__


0

While it looks reasonably straightforward to modify perl to always run with tainting turned on (untested: add TAINTING_set(TRUE); just after the command-line-switch-handling for/case in perl.c), there is no supported way to do it. Setting the PERL5OPT environment variable is as close as its gets. Note that "-T" must come first in the variable's value, and ...


2

You can ask the database to search for the number: my $mobileNumberQuery = "SELECT 1 FROM consumeruser WHERE ConsumerMobNo = ?"; my $sth = $dbh->prepare($mobileNumberQuery); $sth->execute(9999999); if ($sth->fetchrow_array) { print "Found.\n" } else { print "Not found.\n"; }


1

To find good (and not outdated) tutorials on Perl see learn.perl.org and perl-tutorial.org


1

Here's a perl version: my $min = 5; my $max = 10; while (<DATA>) { if ($. > $min && $. < $max) { chomp; $_ .= " "; } print; } __DATA__ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Output: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 It reads in DATA (which you can set to being a filehandle or whatever your application ...


2

You could use something like this (my example is on a slightly smaller scale :-) $ cat file 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 $ awk '{printf "%s%s", $0, (2<=NR&&NR<=5?FS:RS)}' file 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 The second %s in the printf format specifier is replaced by either the Field Separator (a space by default) or the Record Separator (a newline) depending ...


1

The problem with your current regex is that you only have two capture groups. The simplest way would be to use as many capture groups as variables, but that isn't practical. The next simplest would be to match all the variables and then split on comma. But if you still want to do it in one regex, then you can use the \G anchor which matches at the beginning ...


1

Keep it simple. Determine the line that you want to parse using a regex, and then separate the values using split: use strict; use warnings; while ( my $line = <DATA> ) { if ( $line =~ /^print\s+(.*)/ ) { my @vars = split /,\s*/, $1; print "@vars\n"; } } __DATA__ print var1, var2, var3 Outputs: var1 var2 var3


0

(?=(var\d+)) Use this.This will give all var's . Your regex will not work with all cases.It searches print var which is followed by a var.So it will not work in case of print var as there is not var ahead of it. See demo. http://regex101.com/r/pD5sV6/12


0

As has already been stated, $File::Find::name is valid only within the wanted function. Not outside of it. However, I would recommend making the shift to using Path::Class and Path::Class::Rule for some simpler processing of your files in a cross platform compatible way: use strict; use warnings; use Data::Printer; use Path::Class; use Path::Class::Rule; ...


0

Your question isn't clear, and there are several potential reasons for your problem. But these points may help A shebang line is useless on Windows, so it is best to remove it Always use warnings instead of -w on the shebang line This variation on your own code will work fine, but remember that you will get errors if there are problems with the contents ...


0

Just a note: Using $ARGV is dangerous for detecting which file is open, e.g.: mycmd file.1 file.1 file.1 (multiple file with same name). Stick with using eof.


4

Physics::Unit should provide the facilities that you require.


0

Using a Range operator ..: use strict; use warnings; use autodie; #open my $fh, '<', 'sha.log'; my $fh = \*DATA; my @work_items; while (<$fh>) { if ( my $range = /Work items:/ ... !/^\s*\(\d+\) (\d+)/ ) { push @work_items, $1 if $range > 1 && $range !~ /E/; } } print "@work_items\n"; __DATA__ Change sets: (0345) ...


1

$ cat tst.awk { for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) if ( sub(/^A:/,"",$i) ) $i = sprintf("A:%s logA:%.3f",$i,log($i)/log(10)) print } $ awk -f tst.awk file A:164605 logA:5.216 B C D:23 A:223425 logA:5.349


0

use Term::ReadKey; print "Please enter your artifactory user name:"; $username = <STDIN>; chomp($username); ReadMode('noecho'); # don't echo print "Please enter your artifactory password:"; $password = <STDIN>; chomp($password); ReadMode(0); #back to normal print "\n\n";


1

Using a perl one-liner: perl -i -pe 's{\bA:(\d+)\b\K}{sprintf " logA:%.3f", log($1) / log(10)}eg' file.txt Switches: -i: Edit <> files in place (makes backup if extension supplied) -p: Creates a while(<>){...; print} loop for each “line” in your input file. -e: Tells perl to execute the code on command line. One thing that I ...


0

As has already been demonstrated, you need to escape your literal backslashes in regular expressions. my ($captured) = $path =~ /(.+?) \\PostBootLogs/x; However, you can also accomplish this same task without a regex though if you use Path::Class or a similar file and directory managing module. use Path::Class; my $captured = ...


1

In Perl the -p switch sets up an implicit loop that iterates over the input, and prints the content of $_ after each iteration of the loop. Perl also has the -n switch that requires that the code within this implicit loop handle its own output: echo "abc\nxyz" | perl -ne 's/abc/***/ && print' The -p and -n switches are described in perlrun. In ...


3

The -p option to Perl implies doing the actions of the -e ... on each line of the input, then printing. Changing to a -n means read each line of the file and do the -e ... on each. So a simple way of achieving waht you want is as follows: echo "abc\nxyz" | perl -ne "print if s/abc/***/"


1

In HTML, you use the <br> element to create a new line. Therefore, just do a search and replace -- replace any line breaks in your input with <br>. Since you're concatenating $value1 and $value2, you can do this: $values = $value1 . '<br>' . $value2;


1

I've rewritten your program with comments. I hope it helps. I assume my $numbers = reverse $name is spurious? Always use strict and use warnings at the top of every Perl program. It will save you untold time debugging and fixing your program No need to use such lengthy identifiers. They must be meaningful, but you will start to get irritated the fortieth ...


1

Create an infinite loop and break out of it using last if the input matches your desired conditions. use strict; use warnings; my %phonenumbers = ( "Gary" => "0001", "Ian" => "0002", "Nick" => "0003", ); while (1) { print "Whose phone number do you want?\n"; chomp( my $name = <STDIN> ); if ( $phonenumbers{$name} ) ...


0

One alternative to the lock file approach is to use a lock socket. See Lock::Socket on CPAN for such an implementation. Usage is as simple as the following: use Lock::Simple qw/lock_socket/; my $lock = lock_socket(5197); # raises exception if lock already taken There are a couple of advantages to using a socket: guaranteed (through the operating system) ...


0

If you are going to implement a script that performs both reads and writes from/to different handles, consider using select (the one defined as select RBITS,WBITS,EBITS,TIMEOUT in the documentation). In this case you will totally avoid using alarm with a signal handler in eval to handle a timeout, and will only have one loop with all of the work happening ...


2

Try replacing the second line of your loop with print "<td>$_</td>" for @{ $hash{$key} }; Which will loop over each item in the array reference and wrap them in td tags.



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