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0

Mathias is correct, the problem is that your document does not validate. Here's a perl script that will work, it uses HTML::Tidy (requires tidyp to be installed) to clean your document before parsing it. #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use HTML::Tidy; use HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath; my $mess; { open(F, "messy.html"); local $/ = undef; ...


0

As PrgmError points out, you're using a different IP address in your Perl script than in your snmpget command; I would double check that. The particular error you're getting indicates that your username is wrong; if the IP mismatch was simply a typo in your question, I would double check the username next. A few other points about your Perl script: Use die ...


2

A little more succinctly: df -h | perl -wlane 'print $F[3] if $. == 2;' -w enable warnings -l add newline to output(and chomps newline from input line) -a splits the fields on whitespace into the @F array (first column is at index position 0) -n puts the code inside the following loop: LINE: while (<>) { ... # ...


0

This seems to work ok too: df -h | awk 'NR==2 {print $4}' Get the second line and pint fourth field.


0

Compare the following two examples: 1) my $code_block = "helloworld"; my $str = "mars"; format = ^<<<< $str begin ^<<<< $code_block ^<<<< $code_block ^<<<< $code_block end; . write STDOUT; --output:-- mars begin hello world end; 2) my $code_block = "helloworld"; my $str = ...


1

Hta, HTML application, mshta.exe... Old but works like a charm. Pros: Total access to basically everything you could want for development of in-house trusted apps. Cons: Geometry gets tedious, perlscript (vs vbscript/javascript) documentation/examples are basically nonexistent


2

ack uses a home-rolled solution accessed via make ack-standalone. You should have a look at App::FatPacker since that's what it's all about.


1

If you wish to do this all in perl, then: df -h | perl -e 'while (<stdin>) { if ($. == 2) { @x = split; print $x[3] }}' This uses perl alone to read the output of df -h and, for the second record ($. == 2) splits the record into fields, based on whitespace, and outputs field 3 (counting from 0).


1

There's no reason I see why that code would take exponentially more time. I don't see any memory leaks. %values will not grow. Looping over each line in a file does not depend on the file size only the line size. I even made an XML with 4 million lines in it from your linked XML data to test it. My thoughts are... There's something you're not showing ...


7

You really don't want to do that. How will you know what the array is called when you need to access it? Use a hash, like this my %data; my $body = 'CC'; my $letter = 'P'; $data{"$body$letter"} = [];


0

This Perl one-line program will do as you ask perl -e 'rename($_, tr/_/ /r =~ s/(?<!\.)\b([a-z])/\u$1/gr =~ s/(?=[^.]+$)/full./r) for glob "*.ext"' It uses tr/// to translate all underscores to spaces, and then s/// to upper-case all lower-case letters that are preceded by a word boundary and not by a dot character, and again to precede the suffix with ...


0

Assuming you have a Perl-based rename command (often called prename), then: $ prename -n 's/^./\U$&/; s/_(.)/\U$1/g ;s/\.[^.]+$/.full$&/' whatever_whatever2_whatever3.jpg whatever_whatever2_whatever3.jpg renamed as WhateverWhatever2Whatever3.full.jpg $ The first substitute replaces the leading letter with upper-case; the second replaces _x with X ...


1

A simple version that takes a list of files from the command line, renaming per your examples: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use File::Copy qw(move); for my $fn (@ARGV) { my $newfn = $fn; # replace any spaces, tabs or _ with a single ' ' $newfn =~ s/[_ \t]+/ /g; # uppercase the first letter of any words in the new string ...


1

Your current approach using a hash will only return the last matching index if your array contains duplicate elements. Other answers have shown how you can fix your existing code, but to allow for duplicate elements, you can use List::MoreUtils. The following shows how to get the first and last matching indexes for both a fixed search string and a regex, as ...


0

In your code there is the unrelated problem, in that $search4 is not a reqex. $search4 =~ qw/.*?_.*?/; means that you are matching the undefined variable $search4 against qw/.*?_.*?/;. qw is basically splitting a string on whitespace. In this case there is no whitespace and thus you are matching against the string .*?_.*?. In void context this has no ...


2

qw is used to quote lists of words, to store a regex in a variable, it's better to use qr: my $search4 = qr/_/; # the leading and trailing '.*?' are redundant Get a single arbitrary matching index: my ($index4) = grep $array[$_] =~ /$search4/, 0..$#array; Or all of them: my @i = grep $array[$_] =~ /$search4/, 0..$#array;


-1

The most obvious answer is, something like the below. my @array = ('Joe','Jim','Jim_BOB','Hello'); $search = "Joe"; $search2 = "Hello"; $search3 = "Jim"; $search4 = qw/.*?_.*?/; my %index; @index{@array} = (0..$#array); my $index = $index{$search}; my $index2 = $index{$search2}; my $index3 = $index{$search3}; for my $i (0..$#array) { if ($array[$i] ...


0

Did you test your Perl script? In order to have that Perl script give you something to put into your shell script, you to make sure your Perl script works: $ test.pl No output at all. First issue, you put the whole Perl script in sub. Subroutines in Perl don't execute unless you call them. You can't even do that since your subroutine doesn't even have a ...


0

I suggest you use something like this. Note the following use strict and use warnings, and the declaration of all variables with my Meaningful variable names Lexical file handles instead of global ones (my $rep_fh instead of INFILE) etc. I have copied the contents of rep.txt into the array @rep, to save reopening the file multiple times I have left the ...


0

What do you mean match. The two lines don't entirely match. Do you mean if the first six elements in the first file match the six elements in the second file? Are the lines identical except for that final element in the seventh file? Whenever you say "I have to find a match", you think first of using hashes. If your files are very large, you need to think ...


0

Logical AND is && not & in Perl (and most languages) If you want to test for string equality, use e.g. $code eq $code1 (not $code =~ $code1, which does regex matching) Using a nested loop is a slow way of doing things, but it might be fast enough if one or both of your input files is fairly small. But for it to work, you will need to load all ...


0

Looking at your script I noticed that hostname value has 10.0.1.202 but the snmpget command you're using has 10.0.1.203 wrong IP by any chance?


3

You can't return an array. The concept makes no sense since print produces a stream of bytes, not variables. One solution is to output a text representation of the array and have the shell parse it. For example, $ IFS=$'\n' array=( $( perl -e' my @array = ("a b", "c d", "e f"); print "$_\n" for @array; ' ) ) $ echo ${#array[@]} 3 $ ...


2

You can do this, but you need to change vectTEST.pl -- currently you have an anonymous sub that you're not assigning to anything. Change the perl script to: $vect = sub { my $sequence="SEQUENCE1"; my $sequence2="SEQUENCE2"; my @Array=(); push(@Array,$sequence,$sequence2); return \@Array; }; 1; Then, you can do this in bash: mapfile -t ...


0

<> is shorthand for <ARGV>, where ARGV is a special (i.e., magic) filehandle that can either mean filenames from your command-line arguments, or STDIN if there are no command-line arguments. Perl will make the decision how to treat ARGV based on the contents of @ARGV the first time it is used. If you want invocations of your program like perl ...


3

Because you are using the -p switch, which overrides the -n switch, and produces output for every line of input. I'll bet you are now seeing duplicate output for most of the lines in your input.


4

To match on 7 or more characters, you would need to include a , after the 7. Including -p causes perl to print $_ in the continue phase of the loop, so you'll double up on unmatched lines. However, to match only the 11th field, it's more appropriate to autosplit lines on ',' and test the length of the field: perl -i.bak -F, -anwe 'print unless length ...


2

my $cl_op = <>; That will read the first line of the file you passed as the arg. To make it read the user response to your prompt, change it to this: my $cl_op = <STDIN>;


0

Control characters in perl are represented using \c<character>. See: perlrebackslash. To send a control character using the Expect module: $exp->send("\cC");


1

It's wise to include sanity checks to verify that a file name was passed as an argument before attempting to open it. my $user_in; if ( defined $ARGV[0] ) { die "$ARGV[0] does not exist.\n" unless -e $ARGV[0]; open($user_in,"$ARGV[0]") or die("failed to open the argument file $ARGV[0]: $!\n"); }


1

Just a quick shot to get you started: package Dancer2::Serializer::XML; use Moo; use Carp 'croak'; use Encode; use Class::Load 'load_class'; with 'Dancer2::Core::Role::Serializer'; has '+content_type' => ( default => sub {'text/xml'} ); sub BUILD { load_class('XML::Simple') } sub serialize { my ( $self, $entity ) = @_; ...


0

Having read around the subject a bit more, and toyed with the code, I conclude the following: It depends what you're trying to do. As ever. Ajax is probably good for one-shot messages, as jfriend00 says. For my needs, it's going to be better to use a single persistent websocket. It cuts down on code repetition, but means I'll have to invent a simple ...


1

Your HTML document is really an XHTML document that has a default namespace: <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> An XPath expression like //div only finds div elements if they are in no namespace - your div elements are in a namespace. Also, do not make an XPath expression overly complicated, as ThisSuitIsBlackNot suggests, and change it to ...


1

Here is a solution with use if. It looks a bit ugly, because you'll have to ensure that the variables, upon which if (the pragma) operates must be set a "compile-time" (that is in BEGIN-block order). my $test; BEGIN{ GetOptions( "test" => \$test) or die "wrong arguments" } myTest() if $test; say "normal program"; sub myTest{ use if $test => ...


2

If you want the whole Test::More statement only loaded under certain conditions you can do the following: if( $condition ) { require Test::More ; import Test::More ; plan tests => 1 ; # Place your tests here... } This will result in the same as use Test::More tests => 1;. Your problem results in the fact that use is a compile time ...


-1

You use an pseudo hash in perl. If you try to get a value with a nonexisting key you get your error message. Example: $stringObj = [ { "Billy" => 1, "Tom" => 2}, 22, 33 ] print $stringObj->{'Billy'} 22 print $stringObj->{'Steve'} No such pseudo-hash field "Steve" Don't use Pseudeohashes. They are deprecated since 5.8. Detailed ...


1

This works for me with Vim 7.4 on Ubuntu 14.04, so upgrading to a newer Vim version might help. Alternatively, you can work around the problem replacing the backticks with this: :execute 'e' system('perldoc -lm Test::More') To handle special filespecs, you'd have to wrap the system() in fnameescape(), but then you have to drop the trailing newline from ...


2

Further to my comment above, you should get into the habit of using the strict and warnings pragma's at the start of every script. warnings just picks up mistakes that might not be found until runtime. strict enforce a number of good rules including declaring all variables with my. The variable then exists only in the scope (typically the code block) it was ...


1

while (<$fh>) {...} doesn't reread the file from the start on each iteration, no The most likely cause of your problem is that you're keeping data in memory on each iteration, causing memory usage to grow as you work your way through the file. The slowdown comes in when physical memory is exhausted and the computer has to start paging out to virtual ...


0

Following AKHolland's suggestion in comments, I solved this with the yes utility: yes | ./Build installdeps


2

method get_random { return unless @{$self->items}; return $self->items->[ int(rand(@{$self->items})) ]; } or if you don't mind using references, method get_random { my $itm = $self->items; return unless @$itm; return $itm->[ int(rand(@$itm)) ]; }


0

It works on my machines (OS X and Linux) but looking at the documentation (man perlrun) -Idirectory Directories specified by -I are prepended to the search path for modules (@INC). There is no space between -I and the directory. Maybe your Perl version is being to strict and considering everything after the space as a script file.


0

I got this error in a script that appeared to have perfectly matched curly and square braces... except that I had used bash-style syntax which actually commented out the second half of one line (with the second half of a curly brace pair). The error went away when I changed this line: $data_len="${#insert_data}"; to this: $data_len=length($insert_data); ...


0

Use URI::Encode this will do the job for you.


2

chomp returns the number of characters removed, in this case 1. chomp $post_val{'module'}; if ($post_val{'module'} eq "extension") { print "correct...\n"; } else { print "wrong...\n"; }


3

chomp returns the number of characters removed, not the chomped string. chomp($post_val{module}) if ($post_val{module} eq 'extension') { ...


2

You could give Sort::Key::Natural a spin. From the synopsis: use Sort::Key::Natural qw(natsort); my @data = qw(foo1 foo23 foo6 bar12 bar1 foo bar2 bar-45 foomatic b-a-r-45); my @sorted = natsort @data; print "@sorted\n"; # prints: # b-a-r-45 bar1 bar2 bar12 bar-45 foo foo1 foo6 foo23 foomatic


5

You were almost there... the '.CSV' is still there. You'd be better served using regex to read just numeric characters. my @sorted = sort { ($a =~ /(\d+)/)[0] <=> ($b =~ /(\d+)/)[0] } @files; There is an idiom called the Schwartzian Transform that can also do this, though it takes a CS major to understand :D my @sorted = map { $_->[0] } ...


2

I believe that the substr($a, 4) is returning "100.csv" in your example, so that you need to trim the .csv suffix off it still.


1

Have you looked into Class::Tiny? It offers a very minimal, light-weight object. use strict; use warnings; use feature qw( say ); package Mockable; use Class::Tiny qw( getType ); package main; my $foo = Mockable->new( getType => 'ZZZ', ); say $foo->getType; # prints ZZZ This will mock the method you require. If you need something ...



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