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0

There are a couple of ways you can do it, depending on when you want to do it. 1: Within map. Map will evaluate the entire contents of the given block, so if $_ is null, you can make it a blank string instead. print $fh join (',', map {$_='' if (!defined $_); s{"}{""}g; "=\"$_\"";} @$query_result), "\n"; 2: The approach I would take is by making sure ...


4

The man page for prove states that it accepts options and files or directories: prove [options] [files or directories] it will not do any name expansion for you. You have given prove an argument of factorial, while I suspect your test file is named factorial.t The following prove commands should all be valid: prove factorial.t prove fac* prove ...


0

I guess this is tagged "perl" for the regexp part of thing. I agree with @silkfire - to deal with this selection of strings you don't really need the full power of regular expressions. Anyway here is the same thing in perl: my @strings = qw { car car.wheel car.wheel.mirror car.wheel.mirror.seats car.wheel.mirror.seats.heater }; say [ ...


0

Why not let mysql handle it by using SELECT .... INTO OUTFILE Here is an example (from the mysql documentation) that produces a file in the comma-separated values (CSV) format used by many programs: SELECT a,b,a+b INTO OUTFILE '/tmp/result.txt' FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED BY '"' LINES TERMINATED BY '\n' FROM test_table; ...


0

I think this is what you're looking for. The idea is to update the count of IP in the grep call. I showed how to generate the list of ip, but you can also just use keys %ipcounts to retrieve the exact same list... #!/usr/bin/perl # Some data in a list with 3 items per ip my @list = ('dummy', '127.0.0.1', 'dummy', 'dummy', '192.168.0.1', ...


5

Don't try to hack your own version, use a proper CSV module, like Text::CSV to do this. For example: use strict; use warnings; use Text::CSV; my $csv = Text::CSV->new( { binary => 1, eol => $/, } ); ... $csv->print(*STDOUT, $query_result);


0

I have almost done it. Now I don't know just how to check if array with this IP already exists. Now it is something like: for ($i = 0; $i < $list*3; $i+=3) { push(@iplist, $tablist[$i+1]); #This work ok. #But here I have problem. if (grep $_ eq $tablist[$i+1], @iplist2) #I have no idea how make this if. { $iplist2{$tablist[$i+1]} += 1; ...


0

Assuming you're running version 10 or later of Perl 5, you can use the \K (keep) regex construct to write it like this. It allows for leading + or - signs on the floating point number use strict; use warnings; use 5.010; my $s = 'Function_map(var33, 1.95);'; $s =~ s/Function_map\(var33,\s*([+\-0-9.]+)\);\K/\nFunction_map(var18, $1);/; say $s; output ...


1

use Encode qw( encode ); encode('MIME-Header', "\x{2605} David Jones") . ' <david.jones@oozicle.com>';


3

perl -i~ -pe '$_ .= "${1}18$2\n" if /(Function_map\(var) 33 (,[ ][0-9.]+\);)/x' input Explanation: -p processes the file line by line -i~ changes the file "in place", creates a filename~ backup if the regular expression matches, everything before 33 is stored in $1, and everyting after it goes to $2; and those results with 18 in the middle are appended ...


3

No need to use regex. A simple split will do and it works even when your string doesn't have any additional properties: 'car'.split('.')[0] 'car.wheel.mirror.seats'.split('.')[0]


2

I would use: var x = $(yourstring).split("."); console.log(x[0]); Or var text = "your.text.string"; var regex = /^(.*?)\./; var matches = text.match(regex); console.log(matches[0]);


-1

If I am understanding you right then you want to do something like this. use warnings; use strict; opendir my $dir, "/path/to/folder" or die "Can't open directory: $!"; my @files = readdir $dir; closedir $dir; foreach my $file (@files) { if ($file =~ m/\.xml$/) { my $xmlfile = $file; } elsif ($file =~ m/\.txt$/) { my ...


0

You haven't made it clear, despite specific questions, whether you require the file name or the file contents to contain sorted. Here are both solutions First, chdir to the directory you're interested in. If you really need a one-liner for whatever reason then it is pointless to put the chdir inside the program. cd BADnew Then you can either unlink all ...


0

You can write the function like this sub first_file_of_the_type { my $ext = shift =~ s/.*\.//r; +(<*.$ext>)[0]; } And then use it in this way my $xmlfile = first_file_of_the_type("fileName.xml"); my $txtfile = first_file_of_the_type("fileName.txt");


1

Very simple solution: perl -nE's/"[^"]*"//g;say$1while/(\w*akshit\w*)/g' If you expect escaping inside double quotes: perl -nE's/"[^"\\]*(?:\\.[^"\\]*)*"//g;say$1while/(\w*akshit\w*)/g' It's simply, remove double quotes and then search the rest. In a code you can use it like: my $copy = $line =~ s/"[^"\\]*(?:\\.[^"\\]*)*"//gr; say $1 while $copy =~ ...


-2

This regex will return only the "akshitNNNN" strings that are not inside double quotes: (akshit\d*(?=(?:(?:(?<!\\)")(?:(?!(?<!\\)").)*(?<!\\)"|\\.|[^"])*$)) Basically, this regex will match: akshit\d* - akshit + any numbers, 0 or more repetitions (?=(?:(?:(?<!\\)")(?:(?!(?<!\\)").)*(?<!\\)"|\\.|[^"])*$) - is a positive lookahead that ...


0

Most probable cause is current working directory. Before perl command execution, write a command to change directory. Something like : cd perl_path; perl Perl_script.pl


0

$client->print("Smile from the server\n"); '\n' is the end ch for getline


1

Net::SMTP: recipient ( ADDRESS [, ADDRESS, [...]] [, OPTIONS ] ) Notify the server that the current message should be sent to all of the addresses given. Each address is sent as a separate command to the server. Should the sending of any address result in a failure then the process is aborted and a false value is returned. It is up to the user to ...


1

I think you have a pid there - 21655. So finding where the thing is, is as simple as looking in /proc/21655 You should see a few entries in there. Of interest: cwd - current working directory. fd - open files by process exe and root probably won't tell you much unfortunately. There's a bit of a difficulty here though - you know what your process is. ...


2

You can use \K (positive look behind) and .+ to remove everything after PARAM= until newline, perl -i -pe 's/PARAM=\K.+/ $ENV{VAL}/' file.txt or for older perl, perl -i -pe 's/(?<=PARAM=).+/ $ENV{VAL}/' file.txt


0

The problem is that your module have not got app attribute/method which get access to your app. So, when you create instance of Site::Model::Photos you need to pass app to it in param and make it weaken something like that: package Site::Model::Photos use Scalar::Util 'weaken'; sub new { my $class = shift; my $app = shift; my $hash = {app => $app, ...


2

in perl: tshark | perl -lane 'print join "\t", ($F[0], $F[2], $F[8])' the -a option splits each line of stdin into an array called @F. the column numbers don't correspond well to the array index numbers because -a splits by space by default. you can set the delimiter with -F if you like. -F would help get the headers aligned correctly too, but to just ...


2

Try: awk ' BEGIN { printf "%-15s %-15s %s\n", "Host 1", "Host 2", "Total Bytes" } NR>2 { printf "%-15s %-15s %11s\n", $1, $3, $9 } ' file Adjust the output-field widths as needed. The BEGIN block is used to print the output header line. NR > 2 ensures that the input header lines are skipped. printf is used with field-width specifiers create ...


1

Given your output is in filename: sed 's/ \+/ /g' filename | tail -n +3 | cut -f1,3,9 -d ' ' | sed 's/ /\t/g' | sort -r -n -k3 replace multiple spaces with a single one, for tokenizing discard the first two header lines project columns 1, 3, and 9 replace spaces with tabs to have columns back sort desc by total bytes output: 192.168.0.14 ...


0

From the manual: Using Lighttpd You can use Lighttp's mod_proxy: $HTTP["url"] =~ "/application" { proxy.server = ( "/" => ( "application" => ( "host" => "127.0.0.1", "port" => 3000 ) ) ) } This configuration will proxy all request to the /application path to the path / on localhost:3000.


0

We can solve the problem by associating the two files and then adding computed columns according to certain conditions. This is the typical operation for processing structured data. With Perl, the code will be tedious. For this specific task, we can write a simple script with esProc: A1=file("/Users/Me/AssociatedMarkers.txt").import@t() ...


0

Try: find /where -type f -name \* -print0 | xargs -0 grep -lZ sorted | xargs -0 echo rm #can search for specific ^^^ names ^^^^^^ ^^^^ # what should contain the file | # remove the echo if satisfied with the result + The above: the find searches ...


1

the core module File::Find will recursively traverse all the subdirectories and perform a subroutine on all files found perl -MFile::Find -e 'find( sub { open $f,"<",$_; unlink if grep /sorted/, <$f> }, "BADnew")'


0

You should have a look at http://phantomjs.org/ Conversion can be done by a small script rasterize.js and then issuing phantomjs rasterize.js 'http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jakarta&printable=yes' jakarta.pdf


1

It can be done using find and grep combination: find BADnew -type f -exec grep -q sorted {} \; -exec rm {} \; Second -exec command will be executed only if return code for first one is zero. You can do dry run: find BADnew -type f -exec grep -q sorted {} \; -exec echo {} \;


0

Buffering. It's hard to show an example of how to turn the buffering off, when you're using global filehandles and lowlevel core socket functions, instead of using a higher-level IO::Handle-derived socket wrapper. If instead you'd use that, then this would be simple. The server would then be: use strict; use IO::Socket::IP; # use port 7890 as default my ...


3

Ctrl C sends a SIGINT to your program. You can 'catch' this with a signal handler by setting the appropriate entry in %SIG. I would note - I don't see why you're using BEGIN that way. BEGIN is a special code block that's called at compile time - at the very first opportunity. That means it's triggered when you run perl -c to validate your code, and as such ...


3

put the proper signal handler in your code: $SIG{INT} = sub { die "Caught a sigint $!" }; the control-c sends the SIGINT signal to the script, who is catched by this handler


0

I am not sure I understand the value of this module, and the source code has some questionable things, but, apart from that, it looks like you are going to have to use a method similar to what the module itself does: use File::Basename qw( basename ); use File::Spec::Functions qw( catdir ); require String::Multibyte; my $dir = ...


0

to clarify on the return values of subs, by default, Perl returns the value of the evaluation of the last expression in the sub... unless it's in a loop. from perldoc: If no return is found and if the last statement is an expression, its value is returned. If the last statement is a loop control structure like a foreach or a while , the returned ...


2

I agree with all hints the other answers give but I don't see why nobody posted the obvious solution to keep track of the created objects. Of course you can store your objects in dedicated scalar variables: my $espresso = VirtualCoffee->new("Espresso"); my $sumatran = VirtualCoffee->new("Sumatran"); ... As you draw your coffee types from an array ...


0

I figured out another method to get a reference to a parent class subroutine using 'UNIVERSAL' module 'can' method. #Parent.pm package Parent; sub new { my ($class, $arg_hash) = @_; my $self = bless $arg_hash, $class; return $self; } sub printHello{ print "Parent Hello ...


0

This can also be done with basic shell scripting using Solaris 10 ksh: previousNMonth() { y=$(echo $1|sed 's/..$//') m=$(echo $1|sed 's/^....//') m=$((m-$2)) while [ $m -lt 1 ]; do m=$((m+12)); y=$((y-1)); done printf "%04d%02d\n" $y $m } $ previousNMonth 201308 13 201207 If you are using Solaris 11, here is a ksh93 version which is pure ...


0

Given there is the DateTime module installed or you can install modules from CPAN (at least into your home directory): #!/usr/bin/env perl use DateTime; my $in = $ARGV[0] or die "No input"; my ( $year, $month ) = ( $in =~ m/^(\d\d\d\d)(\d\d)$/ ) or die "Wrong format"; my $dt = DateTime->new( year => $year, month => $month ); $dt->subtract( ...


0

I just fixed the same problem by setting two parameters in mlpm init call to false: preventItemClick: false, preventGroupItemClick: false,


-1

you would probably need to first run through the FASTA (whatever that is) file and create a hash of organism to id (assuming both pieces of info are on the same line) my %taxon; while (<FASTA>) { my ($name, $id); # { do whatever you have to do to capture name and id } $taxon{$name} = $id; } then, go through the CSV and use regex to ...


2

First of all, keep in mind that Perl is not Java. So, as appealing as it looks to you, do not use new Class. That is called indirect object notation. It looks cute and familiar, but it will bite you. I am assuming virtualCoffeeObject is class which has accessors for the coffee type it represents. Did I mention, Perl is not Java? Let's say you have the ...


0

#!/usr/bin/perl -X use LWP::Simple; ########## my $user = ''; # Enter your username here my $pass = ''; # Enter your password here ########### # Server settings (no need to modify) my $home = "http://37.48.90.31"; my $url = "$home/c/test.cgi?u=$user&p=$pass"; # Get HTML Code my $html = get($url); #### Add code here: # Grab img from HTML code if ...


1

as the previous answer says, you don't need awk or grep system calls in perl. however, I will tell you that one reason your code isn't working is because you never made the awk system call. print does not execute the system call. you would have to use system() to execute it. anyway fwiw you can also do what you want in a one-liner like so: echo "$(df -h)" ...


-2

Win32::GUI::Dialog(); Must be put after while loop in order to work. :(


1

Yes, my advice would be: Turn on strict and warnings. perltidy your code, use 3 argument open: open ( my $inputfile, "<", 'final_expression.txt' ); die if it doesn't open - the rest of your program is irrelevant. chomp $line you are iterating your filehandle, but once you've done this you're at the end of file for the next iteration of the foreach ...


0

The problem here is that starting from the second iteration of foreach you are trying to read from already read file handle. You need to rewind to the beginning to read it again: foreach $regex (@regex) { seek FILE, 0, 0; while ( my $line = <FILE> ) { However that does not look very performant. Why read file several times at all, when you ...


0

first note that best practices are to call the "new" method (and all methods) with -> instead of like a subroutine, i.e., $object = Class->new(); for (@objects) { my $object = $_; #call methods on the object $object->method(); #assign vars to method call result my $var = $object->method(); #access the objects attributes directly ...



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