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0

sed 's/\x5c\x5c$/\x22\x5c\x5cn\x22/' Hex for backslash and double quote is \x5c and \x22 respectively - it needs to be escaped so \x5c is doubled and the $ anchors to the end of the line.


1

I'd like to either create a csv file to import into a spreadsheet or write directly to a spreadsheet. You can write directly to the spreadsheet, check out Excel::Writer::XLSX. If you want to create a CSV file then you can try using Text::CSV and Text::CSV_XS.


1

Is there any way to check the file line by line while removing comments without using foreach/for You don't need to slurp the file, which will cause large files to overwhelm your memory: use strict; use warnings; use 5.016; my $fname = 'data.txt'; open my $INFILE, '<', $fname or die "Couldn't open $fname for reading: $!"; my $start_comment ...


3

I would do like, perl -0777pe 's/\/\*(?:(?!\*\/).)*\*\/\n?//sg' file Example: $ cat fi /* comments comments comments comments */ bar $ perl -0777pe 's/\/\*(?:(?!\*\/).)*\*\/\n?//sg' fi bar


0

After some searching I came across a very useful old thread which details exactly what I need. http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=420383 I can use XML::Parser::ExpatNB for the behaviour I need. XML::SAX::Expat::Incremental will wrap this up into a SAX interface if necessary but I don't think I'll bother. Sample code is below. It performs well enough ...


2

Simply : foreach(@array) { /regex here../; } or foreach my $a (@array) { $a =~ /regex here../; } or foreach my $i (0 .. $#array) { $array[$i] =~ /regex here.../; }


0

use strict; use warnings; use 5.016; say "0123456789" x 6; my $line = "Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8"; say $line; say unpack('A6 @12 A9 @31 A*', $line); --output:-- 012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789 Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8 Dec 28 01:20:08 160 ...


0

sed 's/\, [0-9]* \([0-9:]*\)\.[0-9]*/ \1/' In words: find the comma, match the year, match the HH:MM:SS, find the period, match the nanoseconds. Keep only a space and the HH:MM:SS.


0

data.txt: Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8 Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8 Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8 command: awk '{gsub(",","",$2); gsub("\\.+[0-9]*","",$4); print($1, $2, $4, $5, $6, $7)}' data.txt > result.txt result.txt: Dec 28 01:20:08 ...


0

You just want to remove the third and fourth column, and the comma in the second column. You could just use the unix command: cut -d ' ' -f 1-2,5-8 | sed 's/,//' example: $> echo 'Dec 28, 2014 01:20:08.555824000 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8' | cut -d ' ' -f 1-2,5-8 | sed 's/,//' output: Dec 28 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8 It will do ...


0

You could do: awk -F"[ ,]" '{split($5,a,".");print $1,$2,a[1],$6,$7,$8}' file Dec 28 01:20:08 160 64.8.23.171 08:0c:29:af:7g:a8


6

The wait family of functions only work on child processes, even waitpid. The sleep process is not your child, it's your child's child. This is because system is essentially fork + exec. By using Parallel::ForkManager + system you're forking, then forking again, then executing sleep. Since you've already forked, you should use exec. This has the extra ...


0

Try putting: die "$xsd is not a file" unless -f $xsd; before your my $schema line, run it again and see what it says. Based on the comments above, it will tell you where it is looking. It looks like either the filename is wrong altogether or $xsd is not an absolute path and the current working directory from the point of view of the script is not the one ...


0

To answer my own question: The assumption that Mail::Sendmail was adding the entities was wrong. I should have checked the other code of the program I was working on more thoroughly.


0

Text::SpeedyFx leaks memory badly. Here's a simple demonstration how hashing the same thing results in memory growth. #! /usr/bin/perl use v5.12; use strict; use warnings; use Text::SpeedyFx; my $sfx = Text::SpeedyFx->new; for(1..1_000) { $sfx->hash_fv("12345", 8192); } say `ps auwx $$`; for(1..10_000) { $sfx->hash_fv("12345", 8192); ...


2

DBIx::Class is the best in class for an object-relational mapper in Perl. It will take care of all the SQL to add, update, delete and search and will do it efficiently. You tell it the tables, columns, keys and relationships. DBIx::Class::Schema::Loader can even do that part for you.


0

Thanks Chris and Ether for your recommendations. I used the following to read a listing of all files (excluded directories), from a directory handle referencing a directory other than my current directory, into an array. The array was always missing one file when not using the absolute path in the grep statement use File::Slurp; print "\nWhich folder do ...


1

Here is what you should do: use strict; use warnings; use 5.016; my $fname = 'data.txt'; my @patterns = ( 'do.', '.at', '.ir.', ); open my $INFILE, '<', $fname or die "Couldn't read from $fname: $!"; while (my $line = <$INFILE>) { for my $pattern (@patterns) { if ($line =~ /($pattern)/) { print "$pattern ...


3

It's apparent that appendTextNode() automatically escapes problematic characters in text nodes. This is what you should do: my $cdata_node = XML::LibXML::CDATASection->new( join "\n", @input ); $new_element->appendChild($cdata_node); XML::LibXML::CDATASection $node = XML::LibXML::CDATASection->new( $content ); The constructor is ...


0

The fragment: <%== @$sections %> is equivalent to: print scalar @$sections; ...so that is why you are getting the array length: an array in scalar context is the length of the array. To get a javascript array, you have to replace <...> below with something that will cause the output to look like a js array: print scalar <....>; You ...


1

You have a redundant closing bracket ()) in your query after "365": $sth = $dbh->prepare (" SELECT SUM(amount), SUM(amount) * 365 FROM spending ");


-1

After you have a regex match you can use the special read only variables; $` finds the previous match $& finds the current match $' finds the next match In your (my) case you need to use: print "$& $line\n";


2

The problem is that <FILE> exhausts the file for the first word. For the next word, <FILE> tries to read at the end of the file, which means the whole loop is skipped. You can iterate over the words inside the loop over the file, or you can seek back to the beginning of the file at the end of the loop.


3

With numpy you could vectorize your whole code as follows, assuming adj_matrix and mapping are numpy arrays: def equate(): row1 = adj_matrix[:row] row2 = adj_matrix[mapping[:row]] return np.all(row1 == row2) It doesn't break out early of the loop if it finds a mismatch, but unless your arrays are huge, the speed of numpy is going to dominate.


0

On Linux it may be enough to resolve the /proc/[pid]/cwd symlink, see procfs(5).


1

You are adding your worksheet with this line. my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet("Colorful Example"); What you need to do is check in your loop where you process lines if you have exceeded the line limit, and if you did, replace the worksheet handle. $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet('foo') if $rows > 65_000;


1

There's WWW::Mechanize::Firefox if you want to do the same thing in a browser. I wrote Controlling Firefox from Perl.


4

You want to use parenthesis ( ) when assigning to a hash, not square brackets [ ]. my %FORM = ("a"=>"0AD", "b"=>"johnny manziel", "c"=>"lincoln"); The [ ] create an ARRAY reference, which is not what you want. Check http://perldoc.perl.org/perlref.html http://perldoc.perl.org/perlreftut.html


0

The GForum directory is not in the search path. To fix this, configure the @INC search path, see the perl faq. Secondly, Apache may not have read permissions for the module directory, parent directories or for the module itself.


0

After days of search, did not find anyway to fix the data in mysql direct or using programming like Perl. The only solution I did is to export the data from mysql the same way I put it in which seems to be double utf8 encoded by Perl to text files but after I utf8 decode it in Perl first. After that the data is correctly saved to text files in UTF8 format ...


1

There's no reason to involve either perl or gdb for this. As of the 1989/1990 C standard, reaching the } at the end of main returns an undefined status to the environment. (The actual status of 4 in your case is probably the value returned by printf, which is the number of characters it printed. The way you invoked the program, argv[0] points to the string ...


1

Here is an awk solution: awk '/^r[01]/ {$3/=100} 1' file r0 = 2.04 r1 = 2.05 max_gap = 20u min = 0 max = 8 thickness = 2 color = green fill_under = yes fill_color = green r0 = 2.05 r1 = 2.06


0

As long as you edit the classes under Schema/Result/.pm classes only under the marked line, there is no problem it re-creates it? That way you know your model is always up-to-date. The class in models (MyDBI.pm) only contains the connection info, right? In the Schema classes, you find the line marked by something like this: # DO NOT MODIFY THIS OR ANYTHING ...


0

You need to first read the whole file ,then run the query. Right now the query is run on every line. But you have each entry one a line - not per column as you write - so you might not need the CSV module? Anyway, there are several errors in there. I've simplified it a little. try something like this: use warnings; use strict; use DBD::Oracle; my ...


0

It doesn't look that different from standard regex... the only change you would have to make is to swap + with | (change (0+1) to (0|1)). Apart from that, you would just have to make the resulting regex match the entire line, either by prepending ^ and suffixing $ or by setting the appropriate option. Shouldn't be more than a couple lines to wrap the ...


3

$mech -> field($name, $value) field() only lets you set one name at a time. But $mech -> set_fields($name => $value, $name2 => $value2,... $nameN => $valueN) ...set_fields() allows you to set multiple names at the same time. That's not really such a big deal because you could always use the first one in a loop: my @data = ( first ...


1

As a one-liner: perl -pi -e 's{^r[01]\s*=\s*\K(\d+)$}{$1/10}e' filename.txt


3

perl -pei 's#^(r[01]\s*=\s*)(\d+)$#$1.$2/100#e' filename The options mean: -p = Run the code in a loop that prints the modified input -e = Execute the code in the first argument -i = Replace the input file(s) with the output The regular expression bits mean: ^ = beginning of line r[01] = r0 or r1 \s*=\s* = any amount of whitespace, an =, and any ...


4

if($line =~ /foo|bar|baz/) or my @kwarray = qw(foo bar baz); my $keywords_re = join('|', map { quotemeta $_ } @kwarray); ... if($line =~ /$keywords_re/o)


0

If you aren't dead set on using LWP::UserAgent, use WWW::Mechanize instead. Best approach: use WWW::Mechanize::Plugin::FollowMetaRedirect. The SYNOPSIS is pretty short and to the point: use WWW::Mechanize; use WWW::Mechanize::Plugin::FollowMetaRedirect; my $mech = WWW::Mechanize->new; $mech->get( $url ); $mech->follow_meta_redirect; # ...


0

You need to re-request that page with the referrer added via referer() for LWP::UserAgent (or see my second answer if you aren't wedded to that module) sub login { # Code not tested and not really compilable, just a stub for you my (@other_args, $url, $referrer_url) = @_; # Add your login code from the question, up to calling $b->request() ...


0

Yes. You can use Text::CSV (use CSV_XS if available for speed) to create comma separated file. It can be imported by any spreadsheet, including Libre Office or Excel. However, you can't save it back to CSV from those programs if you added non-text data such as formatting, only as some spreadsheet format (E.g. XLS) There are Perl modules to read/write XLS ...


1

First of all, non of standard DBI/DBD exibits behavior you listed, in my experience. Without knowing details of what DataBaseQuery() does it's impossible to answer conclusively, but a plausible theory can be formed: Apostrophe is a valid package separator in Perl, equivalent to "::". Reference: perldoc perlmod The old package delimiter was a single ...


2

Looks to me like this is an instance of a bug reported just last month (but that has been around for 12 years): https://rt.perl.org/Public/Bug/Display.html?id=123285 It is fixed but I don't believe in any released version yet.


1

You're not doing anything with the internal captures, so why bother? You could do everything with a grep: $ stage_number=$(grep -E 'Stage\s\d+\s' | wc -l) This is using extended regular expressions. I believe the GNU version takes these without a -E parameter, and in Solaris, even the egrep command might not quite allow for this regular expression. If ...


0

Here are timings for different ways to call matching. $ perl -v | grep version This is perl 5, version 20, subversion 1 (v5.20.1) built for x86_64-linux-gnu-thread-multi $ perl const-in-re-once.pl | sort 0.200 =~ CONST 0.200 =~ m/$VAR/o 0.204 =~ m/literal-wo-vars/ 0.252 =~ m,@{[ CONST ]},o 0.260 =~ $VAR 0.276 =~ m/$VAR/ 0.336 =~ m,@{[ CONST ...


2

That is a horrible piece of Perl code you've got there. Here's why: It looks like you are not using use strict; use warnings;. That is a huge mistake, and will not prevent errors, it will just hide them. Using qx() to grep lines from a file is a completely redundant thing to do, as this is what Perl does best itself. "Shelling out" a process like that most ...


0

As Quentin suggested, NEVER touch your system's Perl. Use local::lib or perlbrew. What you can do now is to use your distro's package manager to uninstall and install Perl, then leave it as it is and install perlbrew.


1

You haven't described your purpose, but I suggest that you use a regular expression match instead of split. But it looks like you're processing free-form text, which will never work properly in the general case. This program finds all of the text (and bracketed meanings) in the input data. use strict; use warnings; while (<DATA>) { while ( / ( ...


1

Have a try with: foreach my $line (@input) { if($line =~/\(.*\)/) { # modifier g can be removed here my @splitted = split(/(\(.+?\))/, $line); # make the match non greedy foreach my $data (@splitted) { print $data, "\n"; } } }



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