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0

I agree with Miller's statement; you should be able to just sleep locally, then resume a loop where you compare via your ftp session. If you need to sleep longer than the ftp session will allow you to remain connected, just re-establish the ftp connection after your waiting period is over and re-run the necessary commands within your comparison loop then.


1

That's exactly what find is for. CGI::Session->find( sub { my ($session) = @_; ... } ); As a side effect, this will delete expired sessions, but it won't change the access time (or anything else) of any of the sessions.


0

thanks for reply. But its not the solution, I wanted. I want the number of times a,b and c occur in column 1 and then corresponding to each term (i.e. a , b and c) how many times x,y and z occur. COLUMN CAN BE MORE THAN ONE. Best


0

I created a couple of functions that check for an alert and then either cancel or interact with it as needed. use Try::Tiny qw( try catch ); # checks if there is a javascript alert/confirm/input on the screen sub alert_is_present { my $d = shift; my $alertPresent = 0; try{ my $alertTxt = $d->get_alert_text(); logIt( "alert ...


0

If you read that session file, and then (if you really trust it) eval the contents, you'll end up with a scalar variable $D that is a reference to a hash of session key/value pairs. That will not update the time stamp. Your time stamps are getting updated by CGI::Session. I might be able to give you more specific advice if you told us what you want to ...


7

Speculation: you called getGenes with several names: getGenes(('name1', 'name2'), $genome); List don't nest in Perl, so the arguments are flattened: getGenes('name1', 'name2', $genome); shift can't return more than one element. Therefore, my @names = shift; is equivalent to my @names; $names[0] = shift; The second name is still in @_, so it goes ...


1

Yes, this does work. The problem is that one of your excludes is a number, not a string. When the right-hand side of a smartmatch is a number, Perl does an == numeric comparison. my $s = 'foo'; $s ~~ 2; # means $s == 2, warns "$s isn't numeric" $s ~~ '2'; # means $s eq '2', no warning If you intend to do a string comparison, make sure your excludes are ...


1

First, the TUN/TAP interface is documented in the Linux kernel documentation, which is worth a read if you haven't already seen it. The examples are in C, of course, but hopefully still useful. I see references to the second arguement being TUNSETIFF. All I know is that it has to be numeric. What is it asking for? This is a C library constant, the ...


0

Take a look here http://perlmaven.com/perl-arrays my @names = ("Foo", "Bar", "Baz"); foreach my $i (0 .. $#names) { say "$i - $names[$i]"; } prints: 0 - Foo 1 - Bar 2 - Baz


0

Here's one way you can use awk to split a file into overlapping chunks: BEGIN { file_f = -1 } # initialise file suffix { l = NR % 20 } # 20 is the repeat length l == 1 { f = 1; file_f += 2 } # f is set for lines 1 to 12, inclusive l == 13 { f = 0 } l == 11 { g = 1; file_g +=2 } # g is set for lines 11 to 2, inclusive l == 3 { g = ...


0

U+00E9 is the code point for é. c3 a9 is the UTF-8 encoding. To see the UTF-8 encoded form of 'é', you need to UTF-8 encode it. For example: #!/usr/bin/env perl -l use utf8; use strict; use warnings; use Unicode::UTF8 qw( encode_utf8 ); binmode STDOUT, ':encoding(UTF-8)'; my $é = "\x{e9}"; print $é; printf "%v02x\n", encode_utf8($é); Output: $ ./u.pl ...


1

You can more efficiently deal with this by capturing up to 8 non-space characters from the start of each line, and using simple hash lookups. #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; my %nops = ( # Name and length of needed headers 'POS1' => 308, 'POS2' => 305, 'POSSBNOP' => 309, 'PERFORAT' => 10, 'DOCVV' ...


2

The code you posted is correct. The problem appears to be that you forgot to tell Perl to encode your output. This is normally done using use open ':std', ':encoding(UTF-8)';


0

Split the query and use it as a look up in the hash: foreach(@nop){ my ($id) = split; print "$id\n" if $nops{$id}; } This assumes the key is separated from the rest of the string by whitespace.


4

You just need to capture what matched. my $pat = join '|', map quotemeta, keys %nops; my $re = qr/$pat/; for my $n (@nop) { my ($key) = $n =~ /^($re)/ or next; my $val = $nops{$key}; ... }


0

If you want to capture the output of the sbatch command you can not use system but have to use backticks to capture the output. Use (untested code): my $jobidA=0; my $jobs = "sbatch jobA.sh"; my $output = `$jobs` ($jobs =~ /^Submitted batch job (\d+)/); $jobidA = $1; my $jobs2 = "$path/jobB.sh"; $jobs2 = "sbatch --dependency=afterok:$jobidA $jobB.sh"; ...


0

In Sybase, the interfaces file in Windows is called sql.ini and it is located in the c:Sybase/ini/ folder.


1

I have to answer my question as I was happy to find a solution. Google changed their authentication algorithm, so we have to use OAuth 2.0. You will need to create Credentials at: https://console.developers.google.com/ APIs & auth -> Credentials -> OAuth -> Client ID -> Installed application -> Other and enable your API i.e.: APIs & auth -> APIs -> ...


2

I don't know exactly what you are trying to achieve, but string eval will put the function in the package namespace (and will redefine if there is already a function by that name). If you only need this in one spot: my $f = sub { my $v = shift; sub { print $v } }->(123); ... $f->(); Example: #!/usr/bin/env perl -l use strict; use warnings; sub f ...


3

You have a wrong subroutine declaration. Try: eval("sub f { print 123 }"); f(); See also: http://perldoc.perl.org/perlsub.html


1

Sounds like you are trying to re-invent the wheel Map/Reduce and it's implementation in Hadoop was invented for exactly "I have a big file (100 GB +). I want to parallel process it." Since the invention of Hadoop, there have been many many additions to the bigdata toolbox. I would suggest you look into spark and maybe python-spark, if you like C, then you ...


0

Um, été is only C3 A9 74 C3 A9 in utf8, in numbers/ordinals été is 233 116 233 which as a perl unicode string is \xE9t\xE9, the number 233 is E9 in hex $ perl -MData::Dump -MPath::Tiny -e " dd ( path(2)->slurp_raw ) " "\xEF\xBB\xBF\xC3\xA9t\xC3\xA9" $ perl -MData::Dump -MPath::Tiny -e " dd ( path(2)->slurp_utf8 ) " "\x{FEFF}\xE9t\xE9" $ perl ...


0

A couple of simple split operations is all that's required use strict; use warnings; my $string = '1256789: David - This is assigned to David 345678: Mike - This order 000345 assigned to Mike 456901: Roger - This is assigned to Roger'; my @assignments = split /\s+(?=\d+:)/, $string; my %assignments = map { split /\s*:\s*/, $_, 2 } @assignments; use ...


0

Here an example: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; while(<DATA>) { s/,+[\t ]*/, /g; # Remove extra commas s/ $//g; # Remove trailing space print; } __DATA__ IFB, Northpole, Alaska, 907-555-5555,,,, Walmart, Fairbanks, Alaska,,,,, Chicken, Anchorage, Alaska, 907-555-5555,,,,, Beef, Somewhere,,,,,Over the Rainbow,,,907-555-5555 ...


0

Here's an alternative way of doing the job. It uses positive lookahead (not negative as I mentioned in a comment). File: pattern.pl #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; my $string='1256789: David - This is assigned to David 345678: Mike - This order 000345 assigned to Mike 456901: Roger - This is assigned to Roger'; while ($string =~ m/(\d+): ...


2

I'd use Config::IniFiles for such a task: use warnings; use strict; use Config::IniFiles; my $ini = Config::IniFiles->new( -file => "stackoverflow_30472923.ini" ); # print $ini->val("RemotePhoneBook0", "path"); $ini -> setval('RemotePhoneBook0', 'path', '/somePath/to/someDir'); $ini -> setval('RemotePhoneBook0', 'URL' , 'someUrl' ...


-1

It appears that you are dealing with records that are separated by two consecutive newlines. So set Perl's input record separator special variable ($/) to look for double-newlines as the record terminator. Then it becomes quite easy: local $/ = "\n\n"; # Set the input record separator to look for two consecutive newlines. while( <$infile> ) { s{ ...


5

Just print it... print $cgi->header("text/plain"), "hello";


1

Doing this with a match-style regex is tricky. I might recommend something more along the lines of the following code: my (@fields) = split( /\s/, $input ); if( scalar( @fields ) < 3 ) { warn "'$input' didn't have enough spaces!"; elsif( scalar( @fields ) > 3 ) { warn "'$input' had too many spaces!"; } split, if used this way, will take a ...


0

From your problem description, it's unclear whether your input string is delimited between records; in other words, are these just tied together with spaces or not? If so, the problem gets a little trickier. In this case, I'm just going to strip the string in chunks: use strict; # Concatenating these to suppress side-to-side scrolling: my $string='1256789: ...


-1

This is a pretty simple homework problem (which is why this has been downvoted a couple of times, no doubt), but it's a good way to show the power of hashes if you're struggling with that. Let's break this down. You want to classify things by the first column (and count the number of occurrences), counting the associated data. Hashes are perfect for this. ...


0

This works. Only two spaces in string. It uses the infamous un-rolled loop method. # ^[^ ]*(?:[ ][^ ]*){2}$ ^ [^ ]* (?: [ ] [^ ]* ){2} $


-1

Fairly easy, in a regex. $hash{$1} = $2 ( \d+ ) # (1) \s* : \s* ( \w+ ) # (2) Edit: I actually thought you were looking for a general idea on how to do a regex. I was hesitant to give you code because in Perl there is more than one way to do it. And I didn't see any clue in your question you even know ...


-2

if($lineas_pag == 160){ $page2 = $pdf->importpage($old, 2); $page2->mediabox('Letter'); my $msg_text = $page2->text; my $font = $pdf->corefont( 'Arial-Bold', -encoding => 'latin1' ); $msg_text->font($font, 8); $txt= $msg_text; } $txt->translate(96 ,$lineas_pag); $txt->text( " HOLA " ...


0

The regex you're looking for is [^ ]* [^ ]\+ [^ ]*. Only when you're looking for more than two spaces you should use {}. For instance, three spaces would be matched: [^ ]*\( [^ ]\+\)\{2\} [^ ]*. Test it out using: grep '[^ ]*\( [^ ]\+\)\{2\} [^ ]*' or grep '[^ ]* [^ ]\+ [^ ]*' If two consecutive spaces are allowed, you could use: grep '\([^ ]* ...


5

It is because MySQL is doing a string comparison, and the string "-5" is greater than the string "-3" even though the number -5 is less than the number -3. The behavior you are experiencing is expected, it is not "broken" as you claim. When using a placeholder, the bound value is typecast to a string, because the column type is varchar. Your query without ...


0

As a 112-bit, big-endian, two's-complement unsigned integer: print($socket "\xCA\x00\x01\x81\x08\x01\x02\x02\x02\x02\x02\x02\x02\x66");


0

Is this what you want? $ awk -v tgt="foo2" 'index($0,tgt){f=1} f&&/#[0-9]/{print tgt, $0; exit}' file foo2 \#89888 $ awk -v tgt="foo5" 'index($0,tgt){f=1} f&&/#[0-9]/{print tgt, $0; exit}' file foo5 \#98980 I'm using index() above as it searches for a string not a regexp and so could not care less what RE metacharacters are in foo - they ...


0

One-liner (regex inside of a regex): s/^(.*'.*)$/my $x = $1; $x =~ s:\\?':\\':g; "'$x'"/me; turns: %3 successful login (test test's test\'s test\\'s test\\\'s string) alert for user %1 from %2|%3 successful login alert|root %3 successful login (test test's test\'s test\\'s string) alert for user %1 from %2|%3 successful login alert|root %3 successful ...


1

Your probably overthinking this. The trick is to consume even preceding escapes before that which needs to be escaped. Then write that back as part of the replacement. This always works with anything you need to escape. This is simple and is the fastest way it can be done.. # s/(?<!\\)((?:\\\\)*)'/$1\\'/g (?<! \\ ) ( ...


1

my $first_idx = index($_, "'"); if ($first_idx >= 0) { my $last_idx = rindex($_, "'"); if ($last_idx != $first_idx) { my $length = $last_idx - $first_idx + 1; substr($_, $first_idx+1, $length-2) =~ s/\G((?:[^'\\]+|\\.)*)'/$1\\'/sg; } } You could do it all in one complicated substitution, but it might hurt performance in ...


1

I believe you can use this regex that will work in older perl also: #!/usr/bin/env perl my $string = "'%3 successful login (test test's test\'s string) alert for user's %1 from %2|%3 successful login alert|root'"; $string =~ s/^[^']*'.*?(?<!\\)\K(')(?![^']*$)|(?<!^)(?<!\\)(')(?![^']*$)/\\$1$2/gm; print "<$string>\n"; Output: <'%3 ...


1

To search for / you have to escape it with \. To check your example however, you need to turn it around because you want to match the / before the ;. In the end it should look like this: if ($Text =~ /\/\n;/) For more information, see perlretut to get an introduction to regular expressions in Perl.


1

Use a backslash to escape your forward slash. Also why are you trying to match it in reverse order? Try $Text =~ /\/\n;/.


-1

I am not able to get this to work. How do you specify the package name on which the method is to be called? For eg: 1. $self->A::foo() 2. $self->Package::A::foo() I am running into this problem.


0

sed sed -n '/foo2/,/#[0-9]\+/ {s/^[[:space:]]*[0\\]//; p}' file | sed -n '1p; $p' | paste -s The first sed prints all the lines between the first pattern and the 2nd, removing optional leading whitespace and the leading 0 or \. The second sed extracts only the first and last lines. The paste command prints the 2 lines as a single line, separated with ...


5

This sorts the top 2 scores for each subject (just for illustrative purposes). You should change 0 .. 1 to 0 .. 29 for the top 30: use warnings; use strict; my %grades = ( math => {bill=>55, joe=>66, mike=>77}, hist => {bill=>72, joe=>33, mike=>99}, read => {bill=>95, joe=>24, mike=>22}, ); for my $subject ...


-3

Count them. $count++; last if $count > 30;


3

Something like this? from subprocess import call as sp_call perlscript = """ use strict; use warnings; print "EHLO world\n"; """ exitcode = sp_call(['perl', '-e', perlscript], shell=False) If you need to capture the output from the Perl script etc, look at subprocess.Popen and friends.


0

perl -ne '/$ARGV[0]/&&print if /^\S+\s+$ARGV[1]\(/ .. /^}/' PATTERN FUNC < file Assuming that you have an orthodox indentation style and that the start of your function declarations look more or less like return_type function_name(arg1, arg2, ...) with no leading whitespace, /^\S+\s+$ARGV[1]\(/ will match the line that begins your target ...



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