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0

Create a lookup table from one of the files (either one), then look up the desired value when processing the other file. my %pencil_by_color; while (<$pencils_fh>) { my ($name, $color) = /^Pencil (\S+) is (\S+)\.$/ or die("Syntax"); !$pencil_by_color{$color} or die("Duplicate"); $pencil_by_color{$color} = $name; } while ...


3

I assume you're referring to the value in the $TRAIT var which is then used as part of the new filename. $TRAIT = $traitarray[7]; $TRAIT =~ s/\s+/_/g;


4

You're presumably talking about the file you open with this open ($t_out, ">outputFiles/".$TRAIT.".txt") You can do that using the transliterate operator first tr/ /_/ and your open call would be better written like this my $outfile = "outputFiles/$TRAIT.txt"; $outfile =~ tr/ /_/; open my $t_out, '>', $outfile or die qq{Unable to open "$outfile" ...


7

You probably updated your Perl to 5.18. In that version the qw operator was changed to not behave like it was parentheses. From perl5180delta: qw(...) can no longer be used as parentheses qw lists used to fool the parser into thinking they were always surrounded by parentheses. This permitted some surprising constructions such as foreach $x qw(a ...


4

You need to put parentheses around the list being iterated over (the qw// construct in this case): for $k (qw(a g c t)) {


10

Perl's bit shift is inherently unsigned so -1 is treated as 2^32 -1 and it automatically fills with 0 so -1 >> 1 is 2^31-1 and -1 << 1 is 2^32-2. [Edit] Thanks @Powerlord using integer will force perl to use signed values. Java's bit shift sign extends (if using >>) so -1 << 1 is still -1 and -1 >> 1 is -2. If you don't want ...


1

The README file says this (emphasis my own) The DBD::JDBC server component The Java classes and their source code are provided in dbd_jdbc.jar. Copy this file to a location of your choice. See the DBD::JDBC documentation (JDBC.pod) for instructions on running the server. If you click instead on the distribution DBD-JDBC-0.70 then you ...


2

Use File::Tail: use File::Tail; my $file = File::Tail->new(name => $name, maxinterval => 300, adjustafter => 7); while (defined(my $line = $file->read)) { print "$line"; } If that does not satisfy your needs, see tell and seek.


0

Like this perhaps open my $log_fh, '<', $logfile or die $!; while ( <$log_fh> ) { print; sleep 15 unless $. % 100; }


1

Just use two loops: while () { # Same as for (;;). for (1 .. 100) { open my $LOGFILE, '<', $logfile or die $!; if ($logline = <LOGFILE>) { # 條件 } sleep 15; } }


0

You have already found stuff that is helpful. But since there are no Perl bindings for this on CPAN, you would have to make your own if you want to use Perl. Fortunately, you don't have to know XS to do that. You can use FFI::Platypus to create temporary bindings and only map what you need. The docs you have probably already found have a Getting started ...


1

Using Selenium, e.g. through Selenium::Remote::Driver, you will be operating real browsers to access the site. Sites can be quite sensitive to subtle differences in browser behavior.


1

From WWW::Mechanize::FAQ Which modules work like Mechanize and have JavaScript support? In no particular order: Gtk2::WebKit::Mechanize, Win32::IE::Mechanize, WWW::Mechanize::Firefox, WWW::Scripter, WWW::Selenium Also see: How do you scrape AJAX pages?


0

This worked for me. Net::FTP get accepts filehandle as LOCAL_FILE. use Path::Tiny; #for path my $local_file = path($out_dir, $file); open my $local_fh, ">", $local_file or die "Can't write to $local_file:$!"; $ftp->get($file, $local_fh);


3

The simplest solution is the following: /^C[BZ]?\z/ If you actually want to match strings that start with "C", but where the "C" isn't followed by "A", then you want the following: /^C(?!A)/


0

issue was resolved,not by me but from perlmonks posting the answer #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use List::Util qw( first ); use Net::OpenSSH; use Log::Log4perl qw(:easy); Log::Log4perl->easy_init($INFO); $Net::OpenSSH::debug = -1; my $logger = get_logger(); my $username = 'admin'; my $password = 'password'; my $ip = ...


0

Updating while making use of the positional ($) operator is supported in the MongoDB official Perl driver. The following would updates a field in the subdocument of an array embedded in a specific document: my $oid = MongoDB::OID->new("..."); $self->collection->update( {_id => $oid, 'grades.grade' => 85}, {'$set' => ...


1

There are various frameworks that will help you communicate in real time over a http/json interface. Mojolicious has excellent Websockets support, and is able to stream data in much the way you want. In older browsers add one of the shims from Modernizer which will gracefully downgrade websockets to a polling mechanism as needed. Here's an example echo ...


-1

Some reading material for you :) https://metacpan.org/pod/PSGI#Delayed-Response-and-Streaming-Body https://metacpan.org/pod/Plack::Middleware::BufferedStreaming https://metacpan.org/source/MIYAGAWA/Plack-1.0037/eg/dot-psgi/echo-stream.psgi https://metacpan.org/source/MIYAGAWA/Plack-1.0037/eg/dot-psgi/nonblock-hello.psgi So copy/paste/adapt and report ...


-2

You can use following regex, C[^A] Demo


0

I think this does what you ask: #!/usr/bin/env perl @array = ("CA", "C", "CB", "CZ"); foreach (@array) { if ($_ =~ m/^C$|^C[^A]/) { print "true \n"; } }


0

The xmessage sub in your cgi script is defined in the main package, while the XUpload module is (apparently) operating in the XUpload namespace. Resolving this issue will ultimately involve learning about Perl's namespaces and the Exporter module. But a quick and dirty fix is to create an alias for your sub in the XUpload package. Add this line to your main ...


-2

#!/usr/bin/perl my @pairs = ( '--configure-option1 --configure-option2 --configure-option3 --configure-option4', '--configure-option3 --configure-option4 --configure-option12', ); my @failures = ( '--configure-option20', '--configure-option2 --configure-option5', '--configure-option10 --configure-option11', ...


0

My concern is would PUT expect the content after I process it with XML::LibXML? I have no idea if the API in question accepts PUT with XML content. You will need to consult the API documentation for this. XML::LibXML is indeed a perfectly capable tool for the job, but you do need to know your way round the XML you've got, whatever tool you use. ...


2

I think this goes some way to solving your problem if I have guessed your data format correctly It converts the @failures array into a hash containing all of the different options that should cause a rejection if they appear. Then it works through the @array (your name, not mine!) and uses grep to check whether any of the constituent options appears in the ...


1

Your question is far from clear. Based on what I can read between the lines, I came up with this: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use Set::CrossProduct; my $x = '[--configure-option1 --configure-option2 --configure-option3 --configure-option4]'; my $y = '[--configure-option20][--configure-option2 --configure-option5][--configure-option10 ...


4

my $alt = join '|', map quotemeta, split ' ', $string; my $re = qr/(?<!\S)(?:$alt)(?!\S)/; my $match = grep /$re/, @array; To speed things up some: my $match = join(' ', @array) =~ /$re/; To speed things up more, and to save memory: my $match = 0 for (@array) { if (/$re/) { $match = 1; last; } }


1

You don't need any quotes at all: $ cat test.awk { print $1 } $ cat script.pl use strict; use warnings; print `awk -f test.awk file`; $ cat file first second third $ perl script.pl first The reason your attempt is failing is that the quotes around '-f /path/to/script.awk /path/to/target/file.txt' mean that it is treated as a single argument to awk. ...


1

You can lock the DATA section of a file to lock the file itself, so you can (ab)use that to control exclusive access to that script. I put this in a library file nap.pl: #!usr/bin/env perl use strict; use Fcntl qw(LOCK_EX LOCK_NB); sub nap { ## make sure this script only runs one copy of itself until ( flock DATA, LOCK_EX | LOCK_NB) { ...


2

I am using windows. You should have stated this as the first thing in your question. On Windows, Perl's fork is actually implemented using Windows threads. Many of the features of real *nix forks do not apply. While Parallel::ForkManager can still be useful for a variety of tasks on Windows, do not expect the kind of performance you need for this ...


5

You don't create any child processes!!! Add the following at the start of your loop: $pm->start and next; It seems your primary concern is now throughput (1000 req/s), not when the requests start. In this situation, you can completely eliminate the time it takes to start a new worker by creating them in advance and reusing them. This is called the ...


4

A good alternative to the final part of ikegami's excellent and detailed answer is to use curry::weak. use curry::weak; my $self = bless({}, $class); %$self = ( environment => 'TEST', config => { MODE => 'NORMAL', ERROR => $self->curry::weak::my_error(), }, ); mst, the author of curry, gives a reasonably ...


7

If you need a sub when you don't have one, you need to make one. You can make an anonymous one. sub { $self->my_error(@_) } So that means my $self = bless { environment => 'TEST', config => { MODE => 'NORMAL', ERROR => sub { $self->my_error(@_) }, }, }, $class; But there are complications. In your ...


0

Are you asking how to get launch a shell to execute both cd D:\MyTest\examples\ and msbuild If so, system("cd D:\\MyTest\\examples & msbuild"); That said, I suspect you actually want system("D: & cd \\MyTest\\examples & msbuild"); In theory, you could also change the parent's current drive and directory, which will be inherited by the ...


-1

You can also rewrite a specific function from scratch, which in my tests gives better results: for ($j = 0; $j < length($needle) && $j < length($string); $j++) { if ($needle[$j] ne $string[$j]) { break; } } Note that the performance is quite better when the code is not called via a subroutine. Also this will need a supplementary test ...


1

Something along these lines perhaps? #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use feature qw(say); my $ts = <DATA>; my @flags = (true=> (<DATA> =~ /(false|true)/g)); my @header = (<DATA> =~ /([a-z_]+)/g); use YAML::XS; print Dump \@header, \@flags; my @selected = grep $flags[ $_ ] eq 'false', 0 .. $#flags; my %output_fh; for ...


1

You're linking to the documentation for addDocument->s<- while calling addDocument (without the plural s at the end). Use the correct method (addDocuments) and the documentation will be correct.


4

How important is this, really? I did a number of benchmarks, and the index method averaged 0.68 microseconds per iteration; the regex method 1.14μs; the substr method 0.16μs. Even my worst-case scenarios (2250-char strings that were equal), index took 2.4μs, regex took 5.7μs, and substr took 0.5μs. My advice is to write a library routine: sub begins_with ...


2

It's because you have a deeper level nested structure than you think. I've marked the lines with # <-- here where I've made changes. The second change (on line 39) is because $resultMap{$regionKey} itself contains a hash, so to copy it, you need to dereference it by surrounding it with the hash's circumfix operator (%{}). #!/usr/bin/perl use MIME::Lite; ...


0

I don't know the language as well, but you can try this logic: var current_line = empty string. foreach LINE in lines { if LINE contains ":" { then 1. Save or do something with last line (current_line). 2. LINE is the start of a new line (current_line = what comes after ":"). } else { then 1. LINE is a ...


0

We don't really just hand out answers without you making an effort first. But it's lunchtime and I wanted a simple programming problem to work on. #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use 5.010; use Time::Piece; my @times = ( 'Apr 11 21:14:25', 'Apr 11 21:10:10', 'Apr 11 21:09:10', 'Apr 11 21:07:10', ); # Need a year for this to make sense. ...


0

Just chomp every first line of the three-line group: perl -pe 'chomp if 1 == $. % 3' < input > output


0

Just read them back in using the detail listener. Paste the text below into sites-enabled/detail (or sites-available/detail and symlink that to sites-enabled), and fixup filename to point to where your detail files live. It will process them sequentially, running each packet through the SQL module, and removing the files when all packets have been ...


-1

Assuming field are double quoted or unquoted but not single quoted sed " # escape with alternative to \ s/=/=e/g;s/\\'/=q/g;s/\\,/=c/g # reset the test jump t next # label for jump :next # change first ' in 5th field by an escaped one # 5th field is field after 4 pattern separate by , s/^\(\([^,]*,\)\{4\}[^',]*\)'/\1=q/ # if found, retry for another one ...


0

After puzzling me for 5 minutes, I found out it is working fine. I think you (like me) just missed it because it is in the same line at the prompt. Look closer after the 18 print: yasin@vonneumann:~/temp$ ./test.pl The value of a is:- 9 the value of b is :- 9 18 found wordyasin@vonneumann:~/temp I suggest you output a new line: if ($sentence=~/brown/) { ...


4

Your solution is not correct. For one thing, you're using plain open, which buffers reads and writes, which causes complications when you want several processes to communicate via one file. As you seem to already suspect, and as others have commented, there is no (reasonable) way on a Unixlike operating system to forcibly make it so that only one process ...


1

I think you should use MIME::Lite module to send email with attachment. Example: use MIME::Lite; my $msg = MIME::Lite->new( From => 'sur@example.com', To => 'serenesat@example.com', Bcc => 'test@example.com', Subject => "Use of MIME::Lite", Type => "text/plain", ); $msg->attach( Type=> ...


0

It is possible, but probably not easy. See: Active State "Will people be able to decompile the executables I've made with PerlApp?" You will need to get familiar with decompilers: Is it possible to "decompile" a Windows .exe? Consider using version control from now on for all of your work. I recommend Git.


6

As has already been pointed out, you need the keyword elsif However, another solution is to put your special rules for each key into a hash and so that you can share code: my %key_length = ( this_setting => 1, some_setting_abc => 1, another_setting_123 => 2, ); my $key = $line[0]; my $index_low = $counter + 1; my ...


4

Let's say $key's value is 'some_setting_abc'. Your first if does not apply, but the second if does. The third if does not apply either but that one has an else therefore that is executed. As @TedHopp pointed out, you need a single if with chained elsifs and a final else instead. However, I want to point out that there is a lot of duplication in your code. ...



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