New answers tagged

0

Change eval "require $module"; to unless (eval "require $module") { die "Error in $module: $@"; } Or do whatever else you want to when there's a typo.


0

It means Spreadsheet::Read module is not install in your system where you are executing your Perl script. Install that module.


0

pack ("N*", $ip) takes an integer out of $ip and puts it into network byte order. What you want is packing the 4 decimal octets of the IP address as binary. No need to fiddle with endianness as the IP address string is already in big endian (The highest order byte is already at the start of the string). I also changed the * to a 4, IP addresses are always ...


0

You might be able to do it with just one match, depending on exactly what you want. If you want to match where the right-hand side is an identifier starting with a letter, this would work: if ($string2 =~ m/^(.*)<=\s*([a-z]\w*s*;/gi) { push @des, $1; push @source, $2; }


0

In the child I do this; Service is the parent perl use Service; our @ISA= qw( Service ); sub new { my ($class, $args) = @_; my $self = $class->SUPER::new($args ); bless $self, $class; return $self; } sub prerun{ #something calling run my ($self) = @_; $self->run(); #self becomes the first argument to run } ...


1

OK, I cracked open the source code Web::Scraper and saw that you can set the value of the second argument to 'RAW' like so: process 'span[itemprop="streetAddress"]', address => 'RAW';


0

You get warning because $relative is only initialized if you have /var/www in $filespec, the same reason for it to be empty. Also you should check that $file_spec begins with /var/www, but not contains it inside. Also you omitted slash after www, so your regex will fail on paths like /var/www2/and/so/on.mp4 Considering this you should change the line my ...


0

for such a simple task as reading a text file and changing a part of it it is often better to use one-liners for inplace editing: perl -ne '@s=split /\t/;if ($s[1]=~/^[\d.]+$/) {printf "$s[0]\t%f\n",$s[1]*1.1} else {print}' input_file.txt >output_file.txt see perl --help and perldoc perlrun for -n, -i and -p switches


0

Something along this line works (I am saying "along this line", since your exact requirement might be more subtle than you already described here): $string2 = "p <= q0;"; if ($string2 =~ m/^(.*?)(\s*<=\s*)(.*)(;)/g) { if ($3 =~ /^[a-z]+/){ print "match"; } } One other issue you probably did not realize is that $3 is not exactly what ...


0

if($string2=~m/^([a-z,0-9]+)\s*(<=)\s*([a-z,0-9]+)(;)/g){ my $d=$1; my $s=$3; if ($3 =~ /[a-z]/){ push @des, $d; push @source, $s; } }


0

Easiest way with regex would be to check if $3 does NOT match any letters.... if ( $3 !~ /[A-z]/) { ... } If you just want to check if $3 looks like a number, then use looks_like_number... It's in the core. use Scalar::Util 'looks_like_number'; # Later... if ( $string2 =~ m/^(.*)(<=)(.*)(;)/g ) { if ( looks_like_number($3) ) { push @des, ...


0

If you want to get a little creative with substr and rindex you can get a much faster solution. my $str = 'rrr.abc.tsy.html'; my $one = substr($str, 0, rindex($str, '.')); # $one = 'rrr.abc.tsy' my $two = substr($one, 0, rindex($one, '.')); # $two = 'rrr.abc' Here's where we get creative. Rather than create an interim variable, you can wrap the substr ...


0

I have a utility method I use all the time for this: sub subst($@) { my($x, @map) = @_; @map % 2 == 0 or die 'subst requires an odd number of params'; while (@map) { my $to = shift(@map); my $from = shift(@map); $x =~ s/$to/$from/g; } return $x; } I use a list instead of a hash for map so I can control the ...


-1

Zan Lynx gives good advice, but to answer your question about hash-driven substitutions, you can use the following: my %replacements = ( foo => 'bar', bar => 'baz', baz => 'foo', # ... ); my $pat = join '|', map quotemeta, keys %replacements; s/($pat)/$replacements{$1}/g; This solves two problems: It scans the input only once, not ...


1

Sometimes the most efficient approach is to parse the old data format into a memory structure and then output the new format. Depending on the structure, this can be done line by line. But if you have to do the whole document that works, as long as they aren't too gigantic. As an example, this is how you'd do an image file conversion: read a GIF into a ...


4

This is an artifact of specifying the string in the code. The @ sigil in perl indicates an array, and in a double-quoted string, this gets expanded (or tries to expand, even if @tiefighter does not exist). You can fix either with the backslash, as you already found, or by quoting differently so it's a single-quoted string (thus, not interpolated). perl -e ...


4

Using warnings would have told you: Unrecognized escape \T passed through in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/\T <-- HERE ext/ at ... $oldText = "\\Text" assigns the string \Text to $oldText, so the two substitutions aren't equivalent. Use \Q (see quotemeta) to quote the contents of a variable: $ln =~ s/\Q$oldText/newText/;


0

This worked for me using sed [Edit: comment below points out sed doesn't support \s] [^ ] while [^\s] didn't # Delete everything except space and 'g' echo "ghai ghai" | sed "s/[^\sg]//g" gg echo "ghai ghai" | sed "s/[^ g]//g" g g


0

You also can install packages on your freebsd box using pkg tool. So, something like this: pkg install p5-DBI p5-DBD-Sybase freetds About your perl check-up script, I guess that you need to also include: use DBD:Sybase; And I will give a try to change DBI:Sybase:server=... to dbi:Sybase:server=... But if you need make sure, check this url: ...


-1

I would like to obtain everything before .txy.htm my $s = 'rrr.abc.txy.html'; my ($wanted) = $s =~ /^(.*?)\.txy\.html/; say $wanted; # rrr.abc If instead you want to remove any trailing .txy.htm, my $s = 'rrr.abc.txy.html'; $s =~ s/\.txy\.html\z//; say $s; # rrr.abc If instead you want everything before the second last ., my $s = ...


-1

^(.+)[.][^.]*[.][^.]*$ Explanation: It will match ^ from the beginning (.+) a group of any length of any characters [.] that are followed by a dot, [^.]* then optionally by some non-dot characters, [.]then by another dot [^.]* and optionally by other non-dot characters $ until the end The result will be captured in variable $1. The question is ...


-1

To modify the string itself to strip the latter portion: my $str = 'rrr.abc.tsy.html'; $str =~ s/^(.+)(\.[^.]+){2}$/\1/; Or you can leave the string alone and simply grab the matching portion in another variable: $str =~ /^(.+)(\.[^.]+){2}$/; my $match = $1; Explanation of regular expression: ^ Match at beginning of string ( ...


2

print $count100; <-- You think it hung before here, print $count200; print $count500; sleep; <-- but it hung here as requested. You didn't see the output of the print statements because STDOUT starts off line-buffered[1], meaning it will only send the text to print when it encounters a newline. To force any pending output to be sent, ...


5

You don't actually alter $_ at any point, so you're printing whatever you got in. That print line should probably be: print OUT join ("\t", $sections[0], $prices ),"\n"; Although actually, you should probably: Use lexical filehandles open ( my $in, '<', 'Resources\shop.txt' ); I wouldn't actually split into an array, then assign that value, then ...


0

You can also not manually count in a loop, by using grep to count for you. use strict; use warnings; my @array1 = ("foo","bar", "baz", "hey"); my @array2 = ("foo", "foo", "bar", "bar", "bar", "baz", "baz"); my %hash; for my $i (@array1){ $hash{$i}=grep{/^${i}$/} @array2 } print "Key: $_ and Value: $hash{$_}\n" for (keys%hash); produces Key: bar and ...


0

Since you've been a tad reluctant to provide the requested info in your question, idk if this is what you're looking for or not but with GNU awk for mktime(): $ cat tst.awk BEGIN { FS="\\s*[|][|]\\s*" } { split($15,a,/[][\/: ]/) a[3] = (match("JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec",a[3])+2)/3 secs = mktime(a[4]" "a[3]" "a[2]" "a[5]" "a[6]" "a[7]) ...


0

All you need to do is change how you declare %hash my %hash = map {$_ => 0} @array1; This will create a hash with keys from @array1 all initialized to zero.


0

Loop over the array1 instead of the hash keys: for my $key (@array1) { my $count = $hash{$key} // 0; print "$key = $count\n"; }


0

As written, it's as pointless of a sort as you think. Based on the comment about preventing order dependencies in the sequence, I suspect that line was intended to instead be: @child = sort { $a cmp $b } keys %hash; or just @child = sort keys %hash; which is equivalent.


0

MIME::Lite / Net::SMTP v3.* - sending via smtp.gmail.com Q1: Can you teknet smtp (25) port at smtp.gmail.com? Do you get SMTP greeting message? telnet smtp.gmail.com 25 A1: NO => It is quite likely that your outgoing connections to smtp port are blocked to avoid outgoing spam. Q2: Can you telnet msa (587) port at smtp.gmail.com? Do you get SMTP ...


0

If you're running this on a well-configured Linux server, you might have better luck if you take out use Net::SMTP and MIME::Lite->send('smtp', $host, Timeout=>60); and just let MIME::Lite use its defaults – usually it lets sendmail handle the message.


0

Here is fixed Sobrique solution: use strict; use warnings; my $thing = '1-8,10,12-15,23'; my @values; #split the string on commas. for ( split /,/, $thing ) { #split each element in `-`. ($end is undefined if no `-` present) my ( $start, $end ) = split ( '-',$_ ); if (!defined $end) { $end=$start;} #iterate from start to end (or ...


2

Like in the shell, you can use braces to delimit a variable name. my $oldname = "${variable1}CHARACTERS${variable2}.txt"; The braces are not strictly necessary to disambiguate $variable2 here (the period is not allowed in a variable name, so it has to end there) but you can use them just for symmetry. In your limited scenario, you could also keep the ...


0

Example: for my $Airport_rf (keys %{$rah_airports}) { if ( $Airport_rf->{NAME} =~ m{\Q$matching\E}xi) { # do your stuff here } } If you don´t know the exact key of the hashref, you have to match the CLI parameter against all values.


3

rmtree is not a built-in, so it does not use $_as the default argument if no arguments are given. You need to pass it explicitly in your second example. rmtree $_ for grep{ -d && /^1234$/} readdir $dh; If a CPAN module provides a function that works on $_, it will always state that in the documentation. That's not the case here. Also not all of ...


0

Are you sure these characters are actually ^ and _ characters? ^_ could also indicate Ctrl-Underscore, ASCII character 0x1F (Unit Separator). (Not a character I've ever seen used, but you never know.) If this is in fact the case, you can remove them with something like: $application =~ s/\x1F//g;


0

Set $Archive::Extract::WARN to false. The documentation states: This variable controls whether errors encountered internally by Archive::Extract should be carp'd or not. Set to false to silence warnings. Inspect the output of the error() method manually to see what went wrong.


0

Go with .. while () { sleep 20; #Code here }


0

You can't have two rows with the same primary key. It appears that you have two rows with CONN_ID = 10560 and PWORD = ??? in your data set. Remove the primary key or clean up your data (get rid of the rows with identical primary keys). Another possible cause of the problem is the SELECT * and the INSERT INTO db1 VALUES .... You should always name the ...


0

The perl code looks self-explanatory to me. Check out PHP's openssl_decrypt documented at http://thefsb.tumblr.com/post/110749271235/using-opensslendecrypt-in-php-instead-of


0

Summing up http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=457530: DBD::PgPP pros: easier to install than DBD::Pg because it doesn't depend on the external dependency more up-to-date (see below) pure perl implementation DBD::Pg pros: actively maintained by the PostgreSQL team has a more friendly PostgreSQL interface offers support for COPY (see ...


0

Use DBD::Pg if it's available, it will be faster than DBD::PgPP because some parts are implemented in C, whereas DBD::PgPP is pure perl (which is what PP stands for).


1

According to CPAN, DBD::PgPP is a pure Perl implementation of the PostgreSQL driver. DBD:pg has some low-level c implementation. If you need only Perl as a dependency, DBD::PgPP is worth looking at.


1

Check out the tr//cd operator to get rid of unwanted characters. It's documented in "perldoc perlop" $application =~ tr/a-zA-Z//cd; Will remove everything except letters from the string and $application =~ tr/^_//d; Will remove all "^" and "_" characters. If you only want to remove certain characters when they at the end of the string, use the s// ...


2

If you want to find out the number of keys/values by using scalar keys: my %name= ( "xyz",1 ,"is",2, "my",3,"name",4); my %copy = %name; my $size = scalar keys %name; print "your rank is : $copy{'xyz'}\n"; print "the size of the array is : $size\n";


4

It is internal information about the hash, please check the perl documentation: If you evaluate a hash in scalar context, it returns false if the hash is empty. If there are any key/value pairs, it returns true; more precisely, the value returned is a string consisting of the number of used buckets and the number of allocated buckets, separated by a ...


3

This will work use strict; use warnings; my $ln = qq{CN=xuser\\,user(loginuser),OU=Site-Omg,OU=Accounts_User,OU}; print $1 . "\n" if $ln =~ /\(([^)]*)/ Things to note I have used strict and warnings to show any errors in the script( would have been very useful for your original) I have used qq{...} to quote the original string I have ended the line ...



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