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0

You can concatenate regular expressions easily: say /$pattern1$pattern2/ for 'ABC', 'XABC'; Note that scalars are usually written without the space after the $ sigil.


0

Essentially the same approach as the accepted solution, but I kept the initial lines the same as the problem statement, since I thought that might make it easier to fit into more situations: my $match = "some_(\\w+)_thing"; my $repl = "no_\$1_stuff"; my $qrmatch = qr($match); my $code = $repl; $code =~ s/([^"\\]*)(["\\])/$1\\$2/g; $code = qq["$code"]; if ...


2

use lib 'your/local/lib/path'; use MyModule; #this should load ./your/local/lib/path/MyModule.pm Can you post an example of what doesn't work?


1

You have a reference to a JSON string. First, get the JSON. my $json = $$content; If you (incorrectly) did Dumper(\$content) instead of Dumper($content), then ignore the above and use the following instead: my $json = $content; # Or just use $content where you see $json later. Then, use a JSON parse to get the data. use JSON::XS qw( decode_json ...


2

That is JSON. So use the JSON module to parse it: use JSON; my $json = decode_json ( $response -> content ); foreach my $element ( @{ $json -> {ResultSet} -> {results} } ) { print $element -> {url},"\n"; } Fuller; runnable example: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use JSON; use Data::Dumper; my $json_str = '{ "ResultSet": ...


0

$1, $2, & etc will capture the value the last successful match. \S+ matches any & negates \s(whitespace)


-1

If you're using Perl 5 and bash, try ammending your shell's PERL5LIB variable to include the path to the directory containing your custom copy. The custom copy path must come before the path of the installed copy. Do the following in your bash shell: PREVPERL5LIB=$PERL5LIB PERL5LIB=/path/to/custom/copy:$PERL5LIB Once you've copied the changes to the ...


5

You can use the following code: #!/usr/bin/perl my $match = qr"some_(\w+)_thing"; my $repl = '"no_$1_stuff"'; my $text = "some_strange_thing"; $text =~ s/$match/$repl/ee; print "Result: $text\n"; See IDEONE demo Result: Result: no_strange_stuff You have to Declare the replacement in '"..."' so as $1 could be later evaluated Use /ee to force the ...


2

So many suggestions... Firstly, your DB insertion program seems to just insert fixed data, so I'm not sure how you think that it works. Also, the if ($tablename == "Article") (and similar) line doesn't do what you want it to. You need to use eq instead of ==. To answer the question that you asked - you need to change your database program so that it ...


4

If a =~ match expression is true, the special variables $1, $2, ... will be the substrings that matched parts of the pattern in parenthesis. $1 matches the first left parenthesis, $2 the second left parenthesis, and so on. \S matches any non-whitespace character, + match 1 or more times, \s matches any whitespace character (space, tab, newline), So in ...


1

=~ is the matches operator in perl and evaluates to true if a string (here $RESULTS) can be matched with a regular expression (here /addr:(\S+)\s+/) When a regular expression is matched in perl, variables are automatically assigned: $& holds the part matched by the whole expression $1 holds the part matched by the first capture group (set of ...


1

it's a bot detection script. It runs the script in there to untangle what you downloaded and verify you're using a (javascript aware) browser rather than e.g. LWP. It's fairly common, especially for sites that you can 'play' via automation scripts more efficiently than you'd be able to in person. Trick is if you 'run' the javascript, you probably get ...


1

Chomp: The chomp() function will remove (usually) any newline character from the end of a string. The reason we say usually is that it actually removes any character that matches the current value of $/ (the input record separator), and $/ defaults to a newline. For more information see chomp. As rightfold has commented There is no trim function in Perl. ...


1

Chomp: It only removes the last character, if it is a newline. More details can be found at: http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/chomp.html Trim: There is no function called Trim in Perl. Although, we can create our function to remove the leading and trailing spaces in Perl. Code can be as follows: perl trim function - remove leading and trailing ...


0

You might have interpolation of @host in your third line because you are using double quotes (""). Do you have use strict and use warnings turned on? There might also be an issue with the space () in the path. use strict; use warnings; use feature 'say'; my $sftp_path = q{"C:\Program Files\Client\sftpg3.exe"}; my $src_path = 'C:\xx\test.txt'; my $result = ...


1

trim removes both leading and trailing whitespaces, chomp removes only trailing input record separator (usually new line character).


3

Let's take a look at the code. Code is yours, with most your comment removed. All other comments are mine. #!/usr/bin/perl # total forks, max childs, what to run # function takes 2 scalars and a reference to code to run sub mfork ($$&) { my ($count, $max, $code) = @_; # total number of processes to spawn foreach my $c (1 .. ...


0

If you have installed Kura, it is acting as a firewall so you need to use the Kura Web UI to open tcp port 8083, which is filtered by default.


1

You want to use String::Substitution. $ perl -E' use String::Substitution qw( interpolate_match_vars last_match_vars ); my ($str, $pat, $x_template, $y_template) = @ARGV; $str =~ $pat or die("Didn'\''t match\n"); my $x = interpolate_match_vars($x_template, last_match_vars()); my $y = interpolate_match_vars($y_template, ...


0

Perl doesn't track added order for hashes, so you'll either have to track that seperately, or just fall back to alphabetical. for my $key (sort keys %hash) {...} is the gist of what you're looking for.


-2

Yes, key insertion order is not maintained. For a module based solution , see http://search.cpan.org/~chorny/Tie-IxHash-1.23/lib/Tie/IxHash.pm Or you can build an index into your key and sort on retrieval: %hash = ( '01:A23' => 1, '02:A03' => 2, '03:A200' => 3 ); foreach $one_key (sort keys %hash ) { print("KEY : $one_key ...


-1

\b(?=\S*[A-Z]\S*[A-Z])[A-Z0-9]{2,}\b Try this.See demo. https://regex101.com/r/cK4iV0/24


1

use 5.12.0; does use feature ':5.12';, so you get say state switch unicode_strings array_base The feature bundles are documented in feature.pm's documentation.


7

This is documented in perldoc feature: It's possible to load multiple features together, using a feature bundle. The name of a feature bundle is prefixed with a colon, to distinguish it from an actual feature. use feature ":5.10"; The following feature bundles are available: bundle features included --------- ----------------- :default ...


1

Assuming threads->create(proc1) even works (and that would only be because you didn't use use strict; as you should), then your program exits immediately after creating the threads. You need to have your main thread wait for the children threads to finish. Fixing that problem (and applying some simplifications) results in the following: use strict; use ...


0

I had the exact same problem on 14.04, and fixed it by adding a swapfile on the system, using the instructions located at: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-add-swap-on-ubuntu-14-04


1

If you really want a run of those matches, maybe use split with zero width assertions and then filter the results: while (<DATA>) { for my $e (split (/(?<=\b)([A-Z0-9_ ]+)(?=\b)/)){ $e =~ s/^\s+|\s+$//g; print "$e\n" unless ($e =~/^$/ or $e =~ /.*[a-z]/); } } __DATA__ The QUICK Brown fox JUMPs OV3R T4E LAZY DoG. Prints: ...


4

It behaves correctly in all existing Perl interpreters. However, the operand evaluation order of the comma operator is documented for when it's used in scalar context, but not for when it's used in list context as the case is here. Worse, it's undocumented behaviour in an area that's undefined behavioue in some languages. I don't see the behaviour changing, ...


1

It appears you want all word definition (construct \w) characters. To find and allow at least two caps and no lower case, you're probably not going to get around the fact that they have to be optionally surrounded by caps and or digits or underscore. Might as well just match what you need. \b[\d_]*[A-Z]+[\d_]*[A-Z]+[\d_]*\b Expanded: \b [\d_]* ...


0

I had to strip down my code, but below is the gist of it. Works for me before I cut it out and pasted here, lemme know if it works else i'll edit it use Mail::IMAPClient; use Email::MIME::Attachment::Stripper; use other stuff as needed.... # login my $sock = IO::Socket::SSL->new(PeerAddr=>'imap.gmail.com',PeerPort=>993); my $imap = ...


0

my ($min,$max) = (sort {$a<=>$b} @array)[0,-1];


5

\b is a shorthand for \x08, so print "a\b"; simply outputs bytes 61 08 Most terminals interpret 08 as a request to move the cursor one position to the left. If you want to "erase" a character, you need to overwrite it with another. print "a\b \b";


0

perl -F'\|' -ae'$F[1]=~s/\..*//;print join"|",@F'


1

You have a couple of problems You are using open to read the directory instead of opendir You are processing both files and directories that readdir returns You are renaming file names without a path, which means Perl will look in the current directory which probably isn't /path/to/dir This will do what you intended use strict; use warnings; my $dir = ...


0

First, open() is used for files. What you want is opendir(). Next, when you use opendir(), readdir(), it doesn't keep the path information, so you need to prepend it to the files you're renaming. Third, it's more common to use lexical handles as opposed to bare names. Lastly, always use strict; and use warnings; which would have pointed you directly to the ...


0

Looking at at the form in question. It does not have a an id or a name. <form class="js-login-form login_form " method="post" action="https://secure-login.twitch.tv/login" accept-charset="UTF-8"> Mechanize does have a form_with_fields() method that allows selecting a form based on the fields it contains.


2

OK, given you're processing files: Miraligner_94G.txt.mirna Miraligner_944G.txt.mirna It looks like you're just picking out the columns from each. So: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; my %data; my %seen; foreach my $file ( glob("Miraligner_*") ) { my ($freq_id) = ( $file =~ m/\_(\w+).txt/ ); $freq_id = "freq_$freq_id"; ...


0

To access a variable in another package, you need to include the package in the mention. $main::dirName


1

How about just perl -pe 'print "#" if /root/' /etc/password Which prints every line anyway because of the -p, but also prints a hash character first if the regex matches


2

You only provided one sample input file so obviously this is untested since you can't test a "merge" with just 1 file: awk ' FNR==1 { split(FILENAME,tmp,/[_.]/) sfx = tmp[2] sfxs[sfx] } { keys[$1] val[$1,sfx] = $4 } END { printf "mir_seq" for (sfx in sfxs) { printf "%sfreq_%s", OFS, sfx } print "" for (key in ...


10

You're printing the return value of print, which is successful so evaluates to 1. I would suggest changing your code to this: perl -pe '$_ = "#$_" if /root/' /etc/passwd Here I'm using the -p switch, so that $_ is always printed. A # is added before the start of the line when /root/ matches. If you want to do the print explicitly, use this: perl -ne ...


8

You only need one print; don't put two more inside the ternary! perl -ne 'print /root/ ? "\#$_" : $_' </etc/passwd As it is, you're unconditionally printing the return value of whichever print the ternary operator executes -- hence, the 1.


3

You are getting a leading 1 on every line because it is the result of the evaluation of the /root/ ? case_true : case_false. To solve it, just get rid of the initial print before /root/: cat /etc/passwd | perl -ne '/root/ ? print "\#$_" : print $_' # ^ # no print! Note also there is no need to cat file | perl. ...


3

What you are looking for I think is the FindBin module. It allows you to include things relative to your current location like so: use FindBin; use lib $FindBin::RealBin. "../mod_path"; use myModul; (You should also turn on strict and warnings)


0

My problem was that I misunderstood how mojolicious was routing to the callback. The following code works with both parameters being optional: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use Mojolicious::Lite; post '/' => sub { my ($mojo) = @_; my $param1 = $mojo->param("param1"); my $param2 = $mojo->param("param2"); ...


1

Update Now that you have explained your requirement better, this solution will do as you ask perl -pe's/ \| [^.|]+ \K [^|]* //x' sample.txt This matches everything between the first and second pipe characters, and removes everything after and including the first dot You can do it this way. The regex just captures all characters that aren't a dot ...


-1

Try this: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; open my $fh, '<', 'filename' or die "unable to open file: $! \n"; while(<$fh>){ #chomp; my @array=split(/\|/); $array[1]=~ s/\.(.*)//g; print join('|',@array); } close($fh); Output: BOI_TESTFEED|youghalsw1|10014 BOI_TESTFEED|youghalsw2|10015 BOI_TESTFEED|youghalsw3|10013 Redirect output ...


0

Since you tagged as "shell" the easier way to do it in a one-liner is: cut -d'|' -f2 sample.txt | cut -d'.' -f1 The first cut command splits the text using | as the delimiter and returned the second column. The second cut command splits the text using the dot as the delimiter and returns the first column.


0

How about: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; while (<>) { my ($thing) = m/\|(\w+)\./; print $thing, "\n"; } Given your input data outputs: youghalsw1 youghalsw2 youghalsw3 Based on your updated comment: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; while (<>) { my @stuff = split /\|/; $stuff[1] =~ s,\..*,,g; ...


2

Size is the difficult part, as to merge files you may need to read in the whole lot. However for a general solution the the problem in perl: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; use Text::CSV; my %count_of; my @field_order; foreach my $file (@ARGV) { my $csv = Text::CSV->new( { binary => 1 } ); open( my $input, "<", $file ) or ...



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