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1

For simplicity, I would probably advise reading from the main while loop and adding to a buffer: my @buffer; while (<$FH>) { push @buffer, $_; if (@buffer == $N || eof) { print @buffer; @buffer = (); } } Algorithmically, I don't expect any particular method to be significantly faster than any other. You could try ...


2

Use IN with placeholders sub reassign_minions { my $self = shift; my @users = $self->get_userids_of_minions(); my $in = join ',', ('?') x @users; my $sth = $self->dbh->prepare(qq{update users set reports_to = ? where userid IN ($in)}); $sth->execute($self->reports_to, @users) or die $self->dbh->errstr;; ...


-1

Try This my $sth = $self->dbh>prepare(qq{update users set reports_to = ? where userid = ?}); foreach my $user(@users) { $sth->execute($self->reports_to, $user); } $sth->finish;


0

To flatten an array of arrays, you need just @giganticarray = map { ref $_ ? @$_ : $_ } @giganticarray but it would be much cleaner if you generated the array the way you want it in the first place. Show us your code and we can show you how


-1

Someone already comment that you should look at Config::General or YAML. You should look at Config::General and YAML. YAML is JSON compatible, but offers more features than JSON. Since your data already looks a little bit like JSON, converting it to JSON would allow you to use existing JSON or YAML tools for interpreting it. Config::General is modelled ...


0

What you have written just strips the comments and field names from the original file. There is no need to go to such lengths to do that. This program produces the same output use strict; use warnings; use autodie; open my $fh, '<', 'penny_config.cfg'; while (<$fh>) { next unless /\S/; print unless /[#{}=]/; }


0

As you said "by reading urls from a text file". You can do that by reading each line and print it out to STDOUT, but I don't think you really need Perl in this case. You can use wget with options you want like -r, -l and turn off the verbose with -nv, then write to the urls.txt file. For instance, to download http://brew.sh site, you could do like: wget ...


0

I'd probably use Parallel::ForkManager instead of threads and WWW::Mechanize instead of curl/wget. A quick search of CPAN also turns up LWP::Parallel


0

I solved it the only way i know how: Screw perlmagic, and do it via command line instead. The below script works on both rectangular and square images. Index is printed to the screen. use warnings; use strict; my $size = '512x512'; my $offset = 512; unless ($ARGV[0]) { die "Missing filename as arg" } unless (-e $ARGV[0]) { die "$ARGV[0] not found.\n" } ...


1

7dayshop uses utf8 character set: <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" /> There are two and ½ things you need to do on your windows machine to read utf8 on the console: Modify your encoding of STDOUT using the following: binmode STDOUT, ':utf8:raw'; Change the encoding of your console using the following ...


2

Do this dump to see a better hash structure: print Dumper(\%spec_hash); To dereference you need: while(my($key,$value) = each(%{$spech_hash{'XISX'}})) {


0

The problem in bigintToBytes is that it returns an empty string when input integer is zero. So I added if($x == 0){ return chr(0); } and the problem is solved!


8

You can also use List::Util (newer versions of this module only) or List::MoreUtils with any, none and friends. use List::Util qw(any none); my @arr = qw /hello ma duhs udsyyd hjgdsh/; say "oh hi" if any { $_ eq 'hello' } @arr; say "no goodbyes?" if none { $_ eq 'goodbye' } @arr; While not perl-native, it doesn't need the experimental smartmatching.


7

unless == if not print "is not in\n" unless ('duhs' ~~ @arr); Note: Smart matching is experimental in perl 5.18+. See Smart matching is experimental/depreciated in 5.18 - recommendations? So use the following instead: print "is not in\n" unless grep { $_ eq 'duhs' } @arr;


0

You're not actually testing the input for fpage and lpage. Try something like: while ( my $in = <$input> ) { my $fpage = $1 if $in =~ /<fpage>(\d+)/; my $lpage = $1 if $in =~ /<lpage>(\d+)/; my $pages = $lpage - $fpage; $in =~ s!<page-count count="NaN"/>!<page-count count="${pages}"/>!; print {$output} $in; ...


0

Have you seen the X11::GUITest module? It provides easy methods for automating X.


2

The Awk solutions have gotten messy so I'd just add another answer that uses Perl. I'm not well-versed in Perl but I learn easy and this could solve it as well: perl -lane '$state = (split(/[<>]/))[2] if /OpState/; print ((split(/[<>]/))[2] . " is $state.") if /<Name>/' file Output: DP-UID-FSH is up. DP-Cert-FSH is up. shape is up. As ...


0

Easiest is to just use grep --files-with-matches StringOrPattern *.hl7 or grep -l StringOrPattern *.hl7 but if you need to do it in python you need to fix your indentation as your current code as posted will only report the number of matches in the last file. import re, os import glob list_of_files = glob.glob('./*.hl7') files_with_matches = 0 for ...


1

You can do this with grep and wc: grep Pathology *.hl7 | wc -l gives you the number of hits. grep -c Pathology *.hl7 will list the files with hits and then the number of hits per file.


5

You have changed from using numbers to using strings to dictate which of the branches should be executed. You need to use eq instead of == to do string comparisons. Like this if ($operation eq "r") { print "entered r\n"; $num_count = $value; init(); } etc. Also, you would be doing yourself and anyone who helps you a big favour if you added ...


0

If you will accept a Perl solution then this fits the bill. As it stands it prints the names of all the matching files. If you really want just the count then remove the line print $ARGV, "\n" use strict; use warnings; local @ARGV = glob './*.hl7'; my $count; while (<>) { next unless /Pathology/i; ++$count; print $ARGV, "\n"; close ARGV; } ...


0

The problem is that you are processing a file from a Windows system that has CRLF at the end of each line instead of just LF (newline). chomp removes the newline, but the carriage-return remains and messes up your output. You can get around this by using s/\s+\z// instead of chomp. But you can avoid the problem with line terminators altogether by using ...


0

Try this $etat =~ s/[\n]+$//; or if that fails $etat =~ s/[\r\n]+$//; I suspect you have one of these as the end of your newlines in the file being read in. I also suspect a single chomp may not work if the line ends in \r\n.


-1

Without knowing the actual input file exact details the below is a suggestion and is written based on the contents of the input file you have provided in your post. use strict; use warnings; open (my $file, '<', 'LIRE.txt') or die "unable to open file : $!\n"; while (<$file>) { chomp(); if (/line protocol/){ my ...


0

Et voila. I get the lines of text sent by the server char per char and detect the newline. So,after \n is detected I can print the full line of text and never miss some (buffered) char. (ok for server sending line of text) Here below the new code for the child: # we are the child print "child: reading from server" line = '' while True: data = s.recv(1) ...


0

With GNU Awk or Mawk: awk -v RS='<OpState>' -F '[<>]' 'NR > 1 { printf "%s is %s.\n", $9, $1 }' file Another: awk '/OpState/ { gsub(/<\/?OpState>/, ""); s = $0; } /<Name>/ { gsub(/<\/?Name>/, ""); printf "%s is %s.\n", $0, s; }' file Yet another: awk -F '[<>]' '/OpState/ { s = $3; } /<Name>/ { printf "%s is ...


0

I am not getting anything weird in your code but you are not using chomp anywhere in the code. Just add chomp $_; at the very start of your while loop. Try this Code: while (<DATA>) { chomp; $ifname = ""; $etat = ""; $myip = ""; if (/line protocol/) { @status = split(/,/, $_) ; @interface = split(/ /, $_); ...


0

When using this code to read datas from my socket: def recvall(sock, length): data = '' while len(data) < length: more = sock.recv(length - len(data)) if not more: raise EOFError('socket closed %d bytes into a %d-byte message' % (len(data), length)) data += more return data If length is '1' I get everything the server has sent (char per ...


1

To expand a second time on VladimirM's answer that the empty pattern // is the problem, the following is from perldoc: The empty pattern // If the PATTERN evaluates to the empty string, the last successfully matched regular expression is used instead. In this case, only the g and c flags on the empty pattern are honored; the other flags are taken ...


0

There appears to be problem in your file file2c.pl at line 43. If you fix it, you should be able to build par exe. C:\Dwimperl\perl\bin\perl.exe file2c.pl -c 30000 par.exe C:\Dwimperl\perl\bin\perl514.dll C:\Dwimperl\perl\bin\libgcc_s_sjlj-1.dll C:./Program > boot_embedded_files.c open input file 'C:./Program': No such file or directory at file2c.pl line ...


0

Hmm, in my example it's good work for me. (perl 5.18.2) my $stop = 0; $SIG{INT} = sub { ++$stop; }; while (!$stop) { print "live\n"; sleep 1; } print "exit by signal" if ($stop);


0

For this you likely want List::UtilsBy: use List::UtilsBy 'max_by'; my %hash = ( chocolates => { lindt => 20, mars => 15, snickers => 35 }, fruits => { apple => 34, orange => 30, pear => 45 }, ); foreach my $key ( keys %hash ) { my $subhash = $hash{$key}; my $maximal = max_by { $subhash->{$_} } keys ...


4

By using square brackets in Perl, you are creating an array reference rather than an actual array. You can read up on how references work in the manual: perldoc perlreftut. Replace the square brackets with round parentheses and the code will do what you expect: my @even = ( 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 ); my @odd = ( 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 ); my $scalar = @even; print ...


0

Do you need that counting? Your output seems to not incorporate it... Using your code sample: #!/usr/bin/perl-w use strict; use warnings; open F,'/user/tmp/output.bed',or die $!; my $i=0; my $wasTheLastGreaterThan5 = 0; while(<F>){ chomp; my @s = split; if(($s[6] >= 5) && !$wasTheLastGreaterThan5){ # Switched from ...


7

The correct syntax for defining your arrays is my @even = ( 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 ); my @odd = ( 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 ); When you use square brackets, you're actually creating a reference (pointer) to an anonymous array, and storing the reference in @even and @odd. References are scalars, so the length of @even and @odd is one. See the Perl references tutorial for more ...


0

XTest extension allows you to simulate pointer/keyboard events. Unfortunately, X11::Protocol does not have this extension implemented so your options are implement it yourself (it's relatively easy, see example in my JS client) wrap external program that talks to XTest talk to a server that talks to xtest ( some vnc client for perl ).


1

Use a range operator: use strict; use warnings; my @last; while (<DATA>) { my @cols = split ' '; if (my $range = $cols[-1] >= 5 .. $cols[-1] < 5 || eof) { @last = @cols[0..2,-1] if $range == 1; print "@last\n" if $range =~ /E/; $last[2] = $cols[2]; } } __DATA__ chr10 299448 299468 SRR048973.1457734 ...


0

$h{'11c'} = 'C'; $h{'b'} = 'B'; $h{'e22'} = 'E'; $h{'aaaaa'} = 'AAAA'; for (keys %h){ $a = \$h{$_} and $b = $_ if $a < \$h{$_}; } print "$b\n"; ! but be carefull due to the obvious causes


0

gl-auth-command means a really old gitolite V2, using gitolite_rc.pm. Its install scripts relies on $GL_RC and $GL_BINDIR environment variables, so check if those weren't unset somehow: the gitweb.conf.pl adds GL_BINDIR to INC (as I mentioned in "How to get gitolite / gitweb working together?"): # now get gitolite stuff in... unshift @INC, $ENV{GL_BINDIR}; ...


0

I suggest that you use the core library Text::Wrap. The following would implement what you're talking about: use strict; use warnings; use Text::Wrap; local $Text::Wrap::columns = 72; while (<DATA>) { my ($word, $paragraph) = split ' ', $_, 2; print wrap(sprintf("%-12s", $word), ' 'x12, $paragraph), "\n"; } __DATA__ one The fallen python ...


0

{ {} {} } Nesting: Recursion Needed This is going to be tricky at best, but I'll give you something to try. Function Delimiter First we need to know how a function starts. What can we take as a delimiter? For instance, is static int always there before the function definition? And is there a guarantee that every instance of static int sits before a ...


0

This scripts (inspired on yours) solves the problem: use strict; use warnings; my $user_filter = 0.21; open my $input_file, "<", "out02.txt" or die $!; # Modern way of open files open my $output_file, ">>", "OUT_t10-t10.txtt" or die $!; while( my $line=<$input_file> ) { if( $line =~ / ([\d\.]+)\s*$/ ) { # If a number was ...


0

Using awk: awk -v value=0.210 '$NF >= value' file Or awk -v value=0.210 '$NF >= value' file > output_file


0

A script like the following could work for you: use strict; use warnings; use autodie; die "Usage: $0 number file\n" if @ARGV != 2; my $minval = shift; while (<>) { my @cols = split; print if $col[-1] >= $minval; } And execute it like: perl yourscript.pl 0.210 out02.txt >> OUT_t10-t10.txt Or using a perl one-liner: perl ...


1

It sounds to me like #2 is a red herring, so let's use Perl to talk to the X server. http://search.cpan.org/~smccam/X11-Protocol-0.56/Protocol.pm looks like it will let you do that. It is a bit old, but the low-level X protocol is still compatible and it should get you close to what you're trying to do.


3

Yes, an array will automatically fill empty indexes with undef when expanded. Another example is the following: use strict; use warnings; my @array; $array[10] = 'last'; use Data::Dump; dd @array; Outputs: ( undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, "last", ) If you want to avoid that type of ...


1

Your secondary script is inheriting %ENV from your first script. If CGI sees a REQUEST_METHOD it ignores the commandline parameters and instead loads things from the QUERY_STRING, etc. To fix this, you must first localize the %ENV and delete the REQUEST_METHOD. The following demonstrates this: part1.pl #!perl use strict; use warnings; use CGI; use ...


0

use Compress::Zlib; #then $out = compress($in) or $out = uncompress($in)


1

It's not interpolating into the string because it's a method call. Try: print "string is ", $csv->string(), "\n";


0

I don't think printf can do what you want by itself, but you can do the wrapping yourself. The following example is primitive but usable: sub wrap { my ($str, $first_col_size, $max_col_size) = @_; my $ret = $str; $ret =~ s/(.{$max_col_size})/"$1\n" . (' ' x $first_col_size) . "\t"/ge; $ret; } printf("%-12s\t%s\n", $key, wrap($result, 12, ...



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