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33

If you're looking for something to do, Perl 6 and parrot have plenty of things which could use some help, and you'd be getting in on the ground floor. :) If you're looking to get real work done tonight, Perl 6 isn't your answer. No matter what you choose, you can always change your answer later. If you have limited time and want to learn a new language to ...


30

To expand on @Reed and point out some highlights, Parrot's opcodes are at a far higher level than most virtual machines. For example, while most machines store integers and floats, the basic registers are integers, numbers, strings and Parrot Magic Cookies (PMCs). Just having strings built in is a step up from the JVM. More interesting is the PMC, sort of ...


28

=:= tests if two containers (variables or items of arrays or hashes) are aliased, ie if one changes, does the other change as well? my $x; my @a = 1, 2, 3; # $x =:= @a[0] is false $x := @a[0]; # now $x == 1, and $x =:= @a[0] is true $x = 4; # now @a is 4, 2, 3 As for the others: === tests if two references point to the same object, and eqv tests if two ...


27

Are you asking why the sub is visible outside the block? If so then its because the compile time sub keyword puts the sub in the main namespace (unless you use the package keyword to create a new namespace). You can try something like { my $a = sub { print 1; }; $a->(); # works } $a->(); # fails In this case the sub keyword is not ...


25

There is no perl6, and there are many Perl 6 compilers. Perl 6 has a grammar, although it's written in Perl 6, so as long as you can understand that, it tells you everything you need to know. I just asked Larry this question, since I'm sitting across from him at lunch at the São Paulo Perl Workshop. He says it's now "Only Perl 6 can parse Perl 6", with ...


24

This has been answered, but I'll step in: Rakudo Perl 6 is the de-facto implemention of Perl 6 right now. It has the most features, the biggest community and an impressive rate of development. The first "1.0" release, Rakudo Star, is planned for April 2010. Perl 6 also runs on Parrot, which is a virtual machine already capable of running another couple ...


23

If I had a training opportunity like this, I'd take it. Even if it was COBOL. I look at training opportunities as not only an opportunity to learn the highlight technology, but as an opportunity to learn new ideas, concepts, platforms, language (just to see how something else was implemented) and finally, to meet new people. I think that any training is ...


21

There is no advantage to be gained by switching from Perl to Python. There is also no advantage to be gained by switching from Python to Perl. They are both equally capable. Choose your tools based on what you know and the problem you are trying to solve rather than on some sort of notion that one is somehow inherently better than the other. The only real ...


21

Firstly, and most importantly, follow the Planet Six news aggregator. Perl 6 weekly meetings and blogs from the lead developers and many members of the community are included, and it's a great way to keep up on the progress of Perl 6. To get an idea of how Rakudo Perl, the leading Perl 6 implementation is doing, check out the Perl 6 Advent Calendar. Every ...


20

Your first stop for Perl 6 modules should be http://modules.perl6.org/. The command line installer that is being used and maintained at the time of writing this update (April 2013) is panda at https://github.com/tadzik/panda/.


18

There are really various reasons why Rakudo is so slow. The first and maybe most important reason is that Rakudo doesn't do any optimizations yet. The current goals are more explore new features, and to become more robust. You know, they say "first make it run, then make it right, then make it fast". The second reason is that parrot doesn't offer any JIT ...


18

Markov owns cpan6.org and worked on-and-off for some years on it. Most people I've talked don't regard this project well for various reasons. Most existing Perl6 code lives somewhere else. There's been talk on cpan-workers to simply extend the archive structure in some canonical way to make it more suitable for other languages. You already can publish ...


17

Perl 5 if you want CPAN, Perl 5 if you want acceptable runtime performance, Perl 5 if you want stability and a language that's complete. Perl 6 if you want to play with the world's niftiest toy. Of course, they're not mutually incompatible -- I write Perl 5 for pay and for most of my "serious" open-source work, and Perl 6 for fun. But I've been writing Perl ...


16

From reddit today: A comparison of the Perl equality operators


14

Here is a quote from the Perl6 webpage (emphasis is mine): Perl 5 and Perl 6 are two languages in the Perl family, but of different lineages. If you are looking for production ready code please use Perl 5. Perl5 is mature. Perl6 is in development.


14

Perl 6's grammar is just a grammar written in Perl 6, and very malleable (though current implementations don't quite provide all of the specced flexibility). So what you ask is possible in principle, but might need more care. In particular are round parenthesis perfectly valid Perl 6 syntax, and even (defun a b) parses as valid Perl 6. So you'd need to be ...


13

You can read about much of this on the Parrot VM Intro page. The main advantage Parrot has over the JVM or the CLR would be that it is designed to support dynamic languages first, and potentially provide better support and performance for dynamically typed languages. The JVM and the CLR are both geared more towards supporting statically typed languages, ...


13

Rakudo is the droid you're looking for. Rakudo is an almost completely working Perl 6 implementation, currently the best approach to Perl 6 you can get. You can download compiled packages or build it from source Perl 5 to 6 - Perl 6 for Perl 5 developers The Perl 6 Wiki


13

Personally I think Parrot will be Perl 6 most compelling feature. A separately designed, and maintained byte code layer specifically designed for dynamic languages, prime for really good runtime optimization projects. But I'd wait to see how that is received before anything.


13

I think it's worth playing with, even if just to make you hate all other languages. :-) There's a really good series of articles by Moritz Lenz over at perlgeek.de (in English) that address the differences from Perl 5 (many!) pretty well.


13

Perl 6 is not production ready using most common definitions of "producion ready" as per SO's own thread - the implementations are not stable and possibly lack full features of the specification. Please see this SO answer for details on the status as of 2008. The language specification seems stable (at least as per brian d foy in the linked post) but the ...


12

Perl5. If you're willing to do all-new development and can wait N years until Perl 6 is actually out, you can learn Perl 6. But really, Perl5. edit to clarify: Rakudo Star, a useful, usable, "early adopter" distribution of Perl 6 has recently garnered some attention, but it's not complete or final, and it's not really ready for deployment in a ...


12

Subroutines are package scoped, not block scoped. #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; package A; sub a { print 1, "\n"; } a(); 1; package B; sub a { print 2, "\n"; } a(); 1;


12

In Perl 6, subs are indeed lexically scoped, which is why the code throws an error (as several people have pointed out already). This has several interesting implications: nested named subs work as proper closures (see also: the "will not stay shared" warning in perl 5) importing of subs from modules works into lexical scopes built-in functions are ...


11

I'd recommend using the latest monthly release of parrot from either the Parrot site or the parrot release on CPAN. I've found that sometimes the latest stuff in trunk/ doesn't work for whatever reason. That's just to get started. Once you're started and brave enough, the bleeding edge stuff might be more appropriate. The Parrot download page has the ...


11

Another thing you have to understand about the lack of optimization is that it's compounded. A large portion of Rakudo is written in Perl 6. So for example the [+] operator is implemented by the method Any.reduce (called with $expression set to &infix:<+>), which has as its inner loop for @.list { @args.push($_); if (@args == $arity) { ...


11

For one thing, Perl 6 is sensitive to whitespace. 1, 2, * * * ... * is perfectly legitimate and generates a sequence that's sort of like a multiplicative fibonacci; it's just a little bit hard to read. *** and * * * mean something different. If the ambiguity bothers you, you can use an explicit block instead of the implicit one that using "whatever star" ...


10

Absolutely, Perl6  takes everything you like about Perl 5, and cleans up the parts you don't. For example, Perl6  actually has real classes, instead of blessed modules. It also has a more consistent use of sigils. There is also a very much improved regex engine. Perl6  has also had an effect in the features that were put into Perl 5.10. If ...


10

In my opinion, Python's syntax is much cleaner, simpler, and consistent. You can define nested data structures the same everywhere, whether you plan to pass them to a function (or return them from one) or use them directly. I like Perl a lot, but as soon as I learned enough Python to "get" it, I never turned back. In my experience, random snippets of ...


10

Python does not have Junctions. In fact I think only Perl has Junctions so far. :-)



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