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2

Are you just curious about whether your code is idiomatic, makes sense, etc.? Apologies if I've misunderstood you and/or SO rules or etiquette in writing this answer. I think you're headed in the right direction. Maybe: sub MAIN(Str $_ = $default-input) { say .comb.Bag<A C G T>; } I've simplified a few things including using $_ ("it") rather ...


2

The example works. Your Rakudo version is likely more then a year old.


7

Give your subs both the special label :DEFAULT as well as a dedicated one when exporting, eg unit module Bar; sub one is export(:DEFAULT, :one) { say "one" } sub two is export(:DEFAULT, :two) { say "two" } Now, you can import all of them with a plain use Bar, or can select specific ones via use Bar :one;


5

With some Googling I've found some additional evidence that Perl 6 indeed has no GIL: As the creator of Perl himself stated in an interview: [...] For developers who are already sophisticated, they'll see that most of the problems endemic to the currently available dynamic languages are solved in Perl 6. We understand lexical and dynamic scoping. We ...


7

There are various ways of getting something similar. Simple hash ( recommended ) my \twostraws = %( 'name' => 'twostraws', 'password' => 'fr0st1es' ); print twostraws<name>; # twostraws{ qw'name' } List with two methods mixed in my \twostraws = ( 'twostraws', 'fr0st1es' ) but role { method name () { self[0] } method password ...


3

Enums can have value types that are not Int. You declare them as a list of Pairs. enum Twostraws (name => "twostraws", password => "fr0st1es"); say name; # OUTPUT«twostraws␤» say password; # OUTPUT«fr0st1es␤» say name ~~ Twostraws, password ~~ Twostraws; # OUTPUT«TrueTrue␤» say name.key, ' ', name.value; # OUTPUT«name twostraws␤» The type that is ...


2

The perl6 equivalent is the Pair type and its constructor operator is =>. They are immutable - once created the key and value can't be changed; $ perl6 > my $destination = "Name" => "Sydney" ; Name => Sydney > say $destination.WHAT ; (Pair) > $destination.value = "London"; Cannot modify an immutable Str in block <unit> at <unknown ...


3

Looks like the type in Perl 6 that you are looking for is a hash. See the relevant documentation: Syntax: "Hash literals" Hash Here is a Perl 6 example that should be equivalent to your Swift example: my %twostraws = name => 'twostraws', password => 'fr0st1es'; print %twostraws<name>; # twostraws


1

Contrary to popular believe StackExchange is not a bug tracker. Pease use https://github.com/perl6/doc/issues to file a bug report against the docs or better, fix it and send a pull request.


3

Is there any examples that more detail about this? Stack overflow is not really the place to request more detail on a published example. This is the perl6 doco on the community itself - I would suggest that the most appropriate place if you have further queries is the Perl6 users mailing list or, failing that, the IRC channel, perhaps. Now that you've ...


1

The problem is a lack of testing on Windows. Please file a bug report against Rakudo. If you got a recent Rakudo Star version that is.


0

So I try your answer but it didn't get me anything back (like he didn't find anything in the db). But I finally find a syntax who did the job. my $email = request.params<email>; my $db = 'select * from user where email=?'; my $do = $*DB.prepare($db); $do.execute($email); my %row = $do.fetchrow_hashref; return (%row);


2

So the grammar in Rakudo is near enough a Perl 6 grammar, but its implemented at the NQP level https://github.com/rakudo/rakudo/blob/nom/src/Perl6/Grammar.nqp So the magic of Grammar::Tracer wont work here. However, you can use the STD grammar https://github.com/perl6/std/blob/master/STD.pm6 to parse some code and that should work with Grammar::Tracer, I've ...


5

You should be using place holders is the main reason why. The slang doesn't do quoting of that kind, and even if it did you'd be introducing a point of entry for a SQL injection exploit in your code - unless you escaped quotes in the variable. Instead try: sql select * from user where nom = ?; with ($name) do -> $row { $row.say; } Good luck with ...


8

For Perl 6, there seems to be the Proc::Async module Proc::Async allows you to run external commands asynchronously, capturing standard output and error handles, and optionally write to its standard input. # command with arguments my $proc = Proc::Async.new('echo', 'foo', 'bar'); # subscribe to new output from out and err handles: ...


5

Neither Perl, Perl 6, nor Java, but bash: timeout 5 bash -c "echo hello; sleep 10; echo goodbye" &


3

In Java you can create a process like this: ProcessBuilder processBuilder = new ProcessBuilder("C:\\Path\program.exe", "param1", "param2", "ecc..."); Process process = processBuilder.start(); // start the process process.waitFor(timeLimit, timeUnit); // This causes the current thread to wait until the process has terminated or the specified time elapses ...



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