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20

Check out the latest development version of Pod::Perldoc. I submitted a patch which lets you do this: $ perldoc -v '%ENV' %ENV $ENV{expr} The hash %ENV contains your current environment. Setting a value in "ENV" changes the environment for any child processes you subsequently fork() off.


18

Use =encoding utf-8 as the first POD directive in your file, and use a fairly recent perldoc (for example from 5.10-maint). Then it should work.


12

If your Perl files contain Perl's Plain Old Documentation (POD), you can use pod2html to generate HTML. Or, maybe you can adapt this to suit your needs: Comments to POD - com2pod.pl


8

Why do you think the code is hard to read with Pod? Is the code hard to read with other code around it? Perhaps you're putting too much into a particular part of the code, instead of writing small methods, etc. Are you sure it's not your code that's hard to read? You don't have to put all of your documentation at the end of the code. Pod is perfectly fine ...


8

Well, POD's the accepted standard for publishing Perl documentation. I do find it rather annoying to maintain as well; I've recently experimented with using Pod::Weaver to maintain the documentation and build it into Pod on release. It's a little bit tricky in that it's quite flexible in how you filter and build the POD, and could do with a little more ...


8

A quick search found Doxygen Filter which purports to allow you to use Doxygen style comments (which are very close to Javadoc) to document Perl code.


7

export PAGER=/usr/bin/less -IJKMRW --shift 5 How perldoc perls the docs is doced in perldoc perldoc.


6

perldoc perltoc is a bit more verbose about the various documentation files. If you want a list of core modules, try perldoc perlmodlib


6

Found this RT ticket.... http://rt.cpan.org/Public/Bug/Display.html?id=39000 This "bug" seems to be introduced with Perl 5.10 and perhaps this pod2man --utf8 needs to be used. /I3az/


6

You're quite right about it being undocumented. I've looked rather hard, and I can't find any reference to it being special either. It is special, as you've discovered, and as demonstrated by: $ perl -MO=Deparse \ -E'opendir(my $dir, "."); while($_ = readdir($dir)) { say; }' BEGIN { $^H{'feature_say'} = q(1); $^H{'feature_state'} = q(1); ...


6

Look more into perldoc. It is a tool for viewing and generating module documentation as well as a command-line tool for reading the Perl documentation. For example, you can create an HTML file of a module's pod with perldoc -o html path/to/Module.pm


6

Found this RT ticket http://rt.cpan.org/Public/Bug/Display.html?id=39000 This "bug" seems to be introduced with Perl 5.10 and perhaps this was solved in later versions. Also see: How can I use Unicode characters in Perl POD-derived man pages? and incorrect behaviour of perldoc with UTF-8 texts. You should add the latest available version of Pod::Perldoc ...


5

I do not have any experience with it, but Pod::Autopod looks interesting. It comes with a command line utility autopod. autopod - using the Perl library Pod::Autopod to generate javadoc like documentation with pod syntax. It is designed to understand perl code in class style, so typically PM files. It might be worth a look. Please let us know if you do ...


4

<> (the diamond operator) is used in two different syntaxes. <*.c>, <*> etc. is shorthand for the glob built-in function. So <*> returns a list of all files and directories in the current directory. (Except those beginning with a dot; use <* .*> for that). <$fh> is shorthand for calling readline($fh). If no filehandle is ...


4

Quotation from perlfaq4: What is the difference between $array[1] and @array[1]? The difference is the sigil, that special character in front of the array name. The $ sigil means "exactly one item", while the @ sigil means "zero or more items". The $ gets you a single scalar, while the @ gets you a list. Please see: What is the difference between $...


4

When features are added to or removed from the Perl core, they are documented in perldelta, so if you get a warning about a feature being experimental, that's a good place to look. If you know the feature was added in Perl 5.14.0: perldoc perl5140delta If not: grep -lr autoderef $(dirname $(perldoc -l perldelta)) The description you linked to in ...


3

Documentation in comments? These are two different concepts. Comments are for the maintenance programmer, documentation is for the user. How very unlazy. What will the unvirtuous newbies think of next? °_°; Convert the text from comment form to POD, meaning removing the # characters and tacking some appropriate =command paragraphs above and below. Then you ...


3

Update your PERL5LIB environment variable to include perl/site/lib/perl5 and you should be OK.


3

perldoc doesn't have an option to search for a particular entry in perlvar (like -f does for perlfunc). General searching is dependent on your pager (specified in the PAGER environment variable). Personally, I like "less." You can get less for windows from the GnuWin32 project.


3

The braces are needed to disambiguate $a from $a0. Note that the tokenizer is greedy, so a variable name is the longest sequence possible. If in a variable interpolation another alphabetic or number follows, you need the ${name} syntax.


3

Don't duplicate documentation, it will go out of sync, just provide links to the original documentation and document the differences.


3

It suffices to conspiciously point to other classes once near the start of the interface description, see best practices documentation example below. Your pod coverage test then should employ Pod::Coverage::CountParents to take inheritance into account. package cachedFoo; ⋮ =head1 INTERFACE =head2 Composition cachedFoo ISA foo DOES ...


3

From the Getopt::Long documentation: GetOptions does not return a false result when an option is not supplied That's why they're called 'options'. In other words, if you are expecting a mandatory parameter, you need to explicitly check for it outside of the GetOptions call. If argument is meant to be part of @ARGV and not the options, use -- to ...


2

The searching for %ENV is a feature of the pager named 'less', not of perldoc. So if perldoc uses a different pager, this might not work. Activestate Perl comes with HTML documentation, you can open perlvar in your browser, hit Ctrl+f and type %ENV, then hit enter.


2

I'm sorry that I didn't think to update the pages that you expected to find this information. I did add a note to the readdir section of perlfunc though. As of Perl 5.12 you can use a bare readdir in a while loop, which will set $_ on every iteration. opendir(my $dh, $some_dir) || die; while(readdir $dh) { print "$some_dir/$_\n"; } closedir $dh; ...


2

New versions of Net::SSLeay don't have the prototype that old versions have. Reading the source of old and new version I'd say the prototype was a bug (the code it calls can handle more variables than advertised). The solution I recommend is upgrading to a newer version of Net::SSLeay. If that is not possible, calling it like &post_https can be a quick ...


2

perldoc searches the Perl module include path (@INC). If perldoc can't find it, perl can't find it. Try perl -wle 'use The::Module' to see if perl can load it. If it can find it, then something weird is going on. What likely happened, if you installed a module via a third party program (even if it's just using the cpan client), is it got installed to a ...


2

You might want to take a look at Rinci. Examples of applications which use this: File::RsyBak, Git::Bunch, App::OrgUtils. Here's how you document modules. You declare %SPEC in your module and put documentation inside it. Each function gets its own key. There are predefined fields. Localization is supported. The formatting is done in Markdown. An example: $...


2

The only time I have had a problem with POD is when using a text editor that doesn't highlight it correctly. Just like everything in Java this seems overly verbose: /** * Returns an Image object that can then be painted on the screen. * The url argument must specify an absolute {@link URL}. The name * argument is a specifier that is relative to the ...


2

$ with brackets avoid the ambiguity of variable names. Such that: $foo = 'house'; 'housecat' =~ /$foo/; # matches 'cathouse' =~ /cat$foo/; # matches 'housecat' =~ /${foo}cat/; # matches Also in the link that you have given, there is a definition for $a and $b, but you have forgotten to copy here.



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