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11

They are both regular expressions. You can read up on them at perlre and perlretut. You can play around with them on http://www.rubular.com. They both implicitly do something with $_. There probably is a while or foreach around your lines of code without a loop variable. In that case, $_ becomes that loop variable. It might for instance contain the current ...


8

<KP_Enter> should correspond to the numeric keypad enter. You can bind it the same way as Return.


6

I'm working on a library to make that as simple as possible, but it's still an alpha version.


6

You can also try swig. It's a tool for generating interfaces to several scripting languages from C/C++.


6

When I run into these sorts of problems, I want to find out who causes them. I turn all warnings into a stack backtrace to see who started the rukus: use Carp; $SIG{__WARN__} = sub { &Carp::cluck }


5

If you're using the system-installed Perl, then why not use the Fedora project's pre-built package for the module. $ sudo yum install perl-Tk


5

Those are regular expressions, used for pattern matching and substitution. You should read up on the concept, but as for your question: s/^\+// If the string started with a plus, remove that plus (the "s" means "substitute"), and return true. /^-/ True if the string starts with a minus.


5

Welcome to the world of concurrent programming. In general terms, there are three main approaches here: Threads Fork / pipe Cooperative multitasking / event loop There are pros and cons to each one. Here's one example using the threads approach; I think this could be useful for you.


5

The trick is to place the widgets with the grid geometry manager, which essentially creates an (uneven-sized) 4x4 grid with the text widget at "North-West", the vertical scrollbar at "North-East", the horizontal scrollbar at "South-West", and the empty square at "South-East". There is a relevant example on the man page. I think I'm allowed to quote the man ...


4

The error messages themselves are straightforward enough: Use of uninitialized value $id in hash element at ...Tk/After.pm line 39. Use of uninitialized value $id in delete at ...Tk/After.pm line 87. "Use of uninitialized value" means that you used a value with a value of undef (undefined). $id is the name of the uninitialized variable. "in hash ...


4

Since Perl is going to be providing the GUI, I'd embed the C++ code into Perl. Assuming that there's going to be a significant amount of C++ code, I'd put that into a library. The traditional way of linking that library to Perl is to create a Perl module using XS. The Tutorial for writing XSUBs and XS language reference manual will help with that. A ...


4

You could use the Tk theme engine to give your app better looks.


4

Try using images instead of button elements, then you can have whatever style you like and the fonts can be baked in. This will work for pretty much any element where the contents are not dynamic - including backgrounds on panes and such. Granted it's more work but it does solve your problem, especially if you have a competent artist in your project group.


3

use the following way use Tk; use Tk::Text ; .... ..... my $txt = $mw->Text( -background =>'white', )-> pack (); $txt -> delete('1.0','end'); Refer the Links. Tk::Text


3

The Scrolled megawidget automatically creates the scrollbar bindings. It's setting the -xscrollcommand and -yscrollcommand bindings, which overrides the ones you specify when you create the widget. If you want to [ab]use the scroll commands to output line/column numbers, you'll have to forgo using Scrolled and create the scrollbars and bindings yourself.


3

Have never tried this, but this PerlMonks thread from 2008 "Perl Tk and Threads" might help you get going.


3

Perl/Tk does not provide such functionality. So you would have to track the events yourself. Note that there are the Any-KeyPress and Any-KeyRelease events, so you don't have to create a binding for every key: $mw->bind("<Any-KeyPress>" => sub { warn $_[0]->XEvent->K; # prints keysym }); If you're on X11, then using the X11::Protocol ...


3

This is the answer in case it helps anyone based on qx comment. sub runBatch { my @batch = qx(sasq $director); print "This is the output\n"; print "-----------------------------------\n"; print @batch; print "-----------------------------------\n"; } This actually works really well--using back quotes: ` sub runBatch { my ...


3

Every Perl/Tk installation has the widget demonstration program installed. Just run it; you will find some menu demonstrations under the "Menus" section. I recommend the 2nd item here (titled "As above, but using Perl/Tk -menuitems"). All demonstrations have a "See Code" button for displaying the source code.


3

Mulit-line input is done with the text widget, as in: # Text widget 20 characters wide and 10 lines tall $mw->Text(-width => 20, -height => 10)->pack; If you're new to Perk/Tk, I strongly suggest running widget from the command line. It's an interactive demo (with code explanations) of Tk widgets and their options.


3

This code is equivalent to if ($_ =~ s/^\+//) { # s/// modifies $_ by default #do something } elsif ($_ =~ m/^-/) { # m// searches $_ by default #do another thing } s/// and m// are regexp quote-like operators. You can read about them in perlop.


3

Try this code: use strict; use warnings; use Tk; my $x = 10; my $mw = new MainWindow; my $label = $mw->Label(-text => 'honeywell')->place(-x => $x, -y => 50); $mw->repeat(2000, \&sub1); sub sub1 { return if $x >= 400; $x += 20; $label->place(-x => $x, -y => 50); $mw->update; } MainLoop;


3

What is the wrap mode of the text widget? If it's configured to wrap on word or character boundaries, the horizontal scrollbar won't ever be needed. For me, the default wrapping mode is char (i.e., wrap lines at character boundaries, like a terminal does) so I guess that's the default for you too, despite the fact that you're wanting it to be none (the only ...


3

The usual way would be to rewrite your application in HTML/CSS/JavaScript. The example you show on the O'Reilly site does the opposite - it shows you how to write a Tk application that will render HTML. A browser plugin is possible if that will provide what you need. If that is the case then the problem is trivial, but you would need the plugin installed on ...


3

Add -highlightthickness => 0 to the Canvas call. This will remove the border which is used to show the currently focussed widget.


2

For non-blocking read of a filehandle, take a look at Tk::fileevent. Here's an example script how one can use a pipe, a forked process, and fileevent together: use strict; use IO::Pipe; use Tk; my $pipe = IO::Pipe->new; if (!fork) { # Child XXX check for failed forks missing $pipe->writer; $pipe->autoflush(1); for (1..10) { ...


2

That error suggests that Tk Label objects simply weren't written to support being shared under ithreads, a circumstance which I'd guess is very arduous to remedy. I'd suggest instead you make a thread responsible for updating the UI widgets and have that thread receive update instructions from other threads. Awkward, but workable.


2

The Label widget inside the Balloon is advertised as the "message" subwidget and may be accessed directly using: my $balloon1_label = $balloon1->Subwidget('message'); You can apply all Tk::Label configure options here, for example the -wraplength option: $balloon1_label->configure(-wraplength => 100);


2

If you close your perl script, it ends. It cannot remember anything, it's not there anymore. But, you can make the script to save the position to a file, and upon startup, you can try to read the position from the file. See the following example: #!/usr/bin/perl use warnings; use strict; use Tk; my $file = 'input.txt'; my $config = '.viewtext.conf'; my ...


2

EDIT: code without button. And don't forget to call MainLoop at the end of your program to display the window. Without it, nothing will ever happen. Try this: use strict; use warnings; use Tk; my $mw = new MainWindow; my $text1 = $mw->Text(-width => 20, -height => 10) ->place(-x => 350, -y => 460); my $showlabel = ...



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