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0

I don't have a direct solution, but once you get that error you'll already have loaded the problematic configuration. So what you can do is to search for all the method strings which contain NeoCSV[1] and then look at the version number used there. You should then be able to change the version number to 12 and simply reevaluate the load statement (the change ...


0

Another well-known option would be to replace your new and return a caching proxy, delegating to the actual object


3

You could use the Reflectivity framework to add pre and post meta links to your methods. A link could check a cache before execution transparently. link := MetaLink new metaObject: self; selector: #cachedExecute:; arguments: #(selector); control: #before. (MyClass>>#myMethodSelector) ast link: link. This code will install a meta link ...


0

One idea that I had is to define doesNotUnderstand: aMessage aMessage selector beginsWith: 'cached' ifFalse: [ ^ super doesNotUnderstand: aMessage ]. ^ cache at: aMessage selector ifAbsentPut: [ self perform: aMessage selector allButFirst: 6 ] This way the only thing you have to do is to replace all message sends like self methodName ...


3

This is indeed a common pattern. It is often used in serialization and materialization. You can find an implementation in STON


4

Consider doing something like this: dict := { #x -> 5 . #y -> 6 } asDictionary. "dictionary as you described" basicObj := Point basicNew. "basic instance of your object" dict keysAndValuesDo: [ :key :val | basicObj instVarNamed: key put: val ]. ^ basicObj


0

There's a method called #lighter: lighter ^ 'updateLightbox();Event.observe(window,"resize",function(){updateLightbox();});' This method calls the updateLightbox() function defined in the #script method. In the last line of that script you'll see Element.show("lightbox");, which calls the scriptaculous show() function on the lightbox node. Take a look at ...


1

During saving the image shutdown and startup lists will be processed during which all sockets will be destroyed, hence the connections are canceled. What we do is to fork the image (with OSProcess) and do the saving in the child process. There's even a method that will do this for you, see OSProcess>>saveImageInBackground. Side note: there are a ...


0

the literalArray encoding is a kind of "poor man's" persistency encoding to get a representation, which can reconstruct the object from a compilable literal array. I.e. an Array of literals, which by using decodeAsLiteralArray reconstructs the object. It is not a general mechanism, but was mainly invented to store UI specifications in a method (see ...


0

The code you exhibit should not trigger the error. But it's possible that you were bitten by the #add: message. The #add: message returns the added element, this way you can chain additions like: collection2 add: (collection1 add: element). This also work with #at:put: collection2 at: j put: (collection1 at: i put: k). is much like c2[ j ] = c1[ i ] ...


1

In Pharo 5.0 (a beta release) you can do: | oc ary | oc := OrderedCollection new: 5. oc addAll: #( 1 2 3 4 5). Transcript show: oc; cr. ary := oc asArray. Transcript show: ary; cr. The output on the transcript is: an OrderedCollection(1 2 3 4 5) #(1 2 3 4 5)


5

You can not convert an existing object into a literal array. To get a literal array you'd have to write it using the literal array syntax in your source code. However, I believe you just misunderstood what literal array means, and you are infact just looking for an array. A literal array is just an array that (in Pharo and Squeak [1]) is created at ...


5

The message asArray will create and Array from the OrderedCollection: anOrderedCollection asArray and this is probably what you want. However, given that you say that you want a literal array it might happen that you are looking for the string '#(1 2 3)' instead. In that case I would use: ^String streamContents: [:stream | aCollection asArray ...


0

You don't say which version of Pharo you're using, but in the stable 5.0, 'hello world this is a selector' asCamelCase asValidSelector yields helloWorldThisIsASelector To get what I'm using run: curl get.pharo.org/50+vm | bash


0

I know this is old but Squeak has a useful implementation (String>>asCamelCase) which basically does this: (String streamContents: [:stream | 'hello world' substrings do: [:sub | stream nextPutAll: sub capitalized]]) asLegalSelector


3

This the answer of Sven (the author of NeoJSON) at pharo-users mailing list (he is not on SO): Reading the 'format' is easy, just keep on doing #next for each JSON expression (whitespace is ignored). | data reader | data := '{"smalltalk": "cool"} {"pharo": "cooler"}'. reader := NeoJSONReader on: data readStream. Array streamContents: [ :out | [ reader ...


1

You could try something like this: | input reader | input := FileStream readOnlyFileNamed: 'resources/pd_items_1.ndjson.txt'. [ Array streamContents: [ :strm | | ln | [ (ln := input nextLine) isNil ] whileFalse: [ strm nextPut: (NeoJSONReader fromString: ln) ] ] ] timeToRun. Unless this is what you tried already...


2

Would it work if you opened a new ReadWriteStream, first wrote ${ onto it, then stream all contents of your original stream separated by commas onto it and then write a trailing $}. The resulting stream should be good for NeoJSON... ? This is probably a STTCPW attack to the problem, but the W is impprtant ;-) And it should be faster and less memory ...


5

Pharo does have inequality: anObject ~= otherObject This is equivalent to (anObject = otherObject) not What Pharo does not have (along with any other Smalltalk or pure object language) is such thing as an "operator" (which is a mathematical function). In Pharo, both = and ~= are not operators but simple messages you send to an object. In this case ...


6

There is an inequality operator, a ~= b although it's rarely used as it is often better to just write a = b ifFalse: [ ...] That's not all however, and: accepts a block, not a boolean so contact password = contact confirmPassword and: firstTime = false should actually be contact password = contact confirmPassword and: [ firstTime = false ] if you ...


2

you can set the font on the returned widget from the builder, similar to the calls acceptOnCr or minWidth. For example: login := (builder newTextEntryFor: 'contact' getText: #login setText: #login: help: 'Enter the login of the user') font: StandardFonts codeFont; acceptOnCR: false; minWidth: 200; font: StandardFont ...


1

Morphic is implemented with Smalltalk in Pharo and Squeak. So there are no bindings to an external graphics library. Though there are some differences the basic API is the same. Pharo by example, chapter 11 Squeak by example, chapter 11 Squeak wiki http://wiki.squeak.org/squeak/30 contains useful notes how Morphic works. There is as well a Morphic ...


4

I also prefer GT to be optional, the fact the Pharo board is going to impose GT by default in upcoming Pharos makes me think about the transparency process, and how far is a Pharo fork if such policies continues. That said, GT tools cannot be easily uninstalled (and it takes a lot of time): The process is like this: First open a Playground and deactivate ...


3

If you want to use older versions, all you have to do is to go to settings and deactivate them (go to settings in the menu: world menu/system/settings), then look for "Glamorous Toolkit". Unloading packages is a lot more complicated: You need to iterate each package in correct order and unload it. Now, notice that GT tools are the official tools ...


3

One possibility is that you nilled a class binding. Inspect the following to get a list of keys and values that are nil: Smalltalk globals associations select: [ :assoc | assoc value isNil or: [ assoc key isNil ] ]. BTW: rather then attaching a screen shot it would help if you attached the stack. To get the stack trace, right click on the ...



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