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31

Version 1 of D is mature and stable, and there are definitely folks who use it for real work. Phobos is the only standard library that D has ever had or likely ever will have, but D1's Phobos is lacking enough that various third-party libraries were created to fill in the gaps. Tango is the largest of these and is the most heavily used third-party library ...


27

I recommend using D2 with Phobos. It's at the point where the language is enjoyable enough and stable enough to make up for the occasional frustrations caused by implementation issues.


20

An enum is only an rvalue, not an lvalue. It has no address. An enum can only be a compile time constant, not a runtime constant. Enums don't add any bloat to the object file. Enums compile faster and use less memory at compile time. Usually it's negligible, but if you're doing sufficiently complicated metaprogramming it can start to matter. In general, ...


19

import std.conv; int i = 15; string message = "Value of 'i' is " ~ to!string(i); or format: import std.string; string message = format("Value of 'i' is %s.", i);


15

std.algorithm: yep and you can implement it like reduce!fun(retro(r)) this module specifies algorithms that run on sequences std.array: no because it can also run on other ranges these are helper functions that run only on build-in arrays std.container: no because it doesn't define a data structure (like a treeset) this defines data structures that are ...


14

Use SortedRange from std.range: Cribbed from http://www.digitalmars.com/d/2.0/phobos/std_range.html#SortedRange: auto a = [ 1, 2, 3, 42, 52, 64 ]; auto r = assumeSorted(a); assert(r.canFind(3)); assert(!r.canFind(32));


13

A common core, called druntime, has been built for D2. The low-level runtime stuff, like garbage collection and threading, was previously the barrier to Phobos and Tango interoperating in the same project. Phobos's higher level functionality depended on the Phobos runtime and likewise for Tango. A major update to Phobos has been released (just yesterday ...


12

I know that there are currently two standard libraries (Phobos and Tango), so I assume that there might be people trying to unify them. "Unification" is extremely unlikely due to differences in licenses. When Tango will be ported to D 2.0, you will be able to use it alongside Phobos, which isn't (easily) possible in D 1.0. Additionally I heard some ...


11

All strings are treated as ranges of dchar. That's because a dchar is guaranteed to be a single code point, since in UTF-32, every code unit is a code point, whereas in UTF-8 (char) and UTF-16 (wchar), the number of code units per code point varies. So, if you were operating on individual chars or wchars, you'd be operating on pieces of characters rather ...


9

If you need to use D2 then phobos is what you should use for now but tango for D2 is in development. tangobos allows to use tango and phobos together at the same time. In D2 both work together anyway as they both make use of the separate druntime.


9

You seem to confuse format with sformat. format does exactly what you want: datestr = format("%s-%s-%s", y, m, d); The most basic way to concatenate strings would be with ~: datestr = y ~ "-" ~ m ~ "-" ~ d; More on that: http://dlang.org/arrays.html#array-concatenation


8

I believe that the only real options for file I/O in Phobos at this point (aside from calling C functions) are std.file.readText and std.stdio.File. readText will read in a file as an array of chars, wchars, or dchars (defaulting to immutable(char)[] - i.e. string). I believe that the encoding must be UTF-8, UTF-16, and UTF-32 for chars, wchars, and dchars ...


8

D, like C, C++, C#, and Java is a statically typed language. All types must be known at compile time. So, no, you can't do what you're trying to do. Now, you could use inheritance, unions, or std.variant.Variant to get a form of dynamic typing, but not quite like what you're trying to do. That only works in dynamic languages. With classes, a class ...


8

there is std.algortihm.remove(pred,Range)(Range) (look a bit further down the page) which does what you ask


8

For optional values, the D standard library provides the struct template Nullable in the module std.typecons.


7

They're not extension methods per-se, just some bug that turned into a neat feature. The similarity between those two methods is that both has a string as the first parameter. So the trick that is at work here, is that given an array T[] arr, and a function U foo (T[] t, other params) can be called by doing arr.foo(some arguments matching other params) ...


7

I've had little experience with both (kinda ..) Phobos is more flat and python-like, but quite incomplete. Tango is more Java-like, it makes simple things complicated. I personally prefer to go with phobos, unless you need a library that depends on Tango (such as DWT).


7

Some of them exist, some of them don't. The best strategy to find them is to just do a global search look for the text : Exception in the D runtime (and Phobos), and seeing what all the preexisting exceptions are. Most likely, though, you'll have to roll out at least some of your own. What I found through this search were the following: ...


7

Tango is currently outdated. It only works with the old version of D. In my opinion, Phobos is the only way forward. I wasn't following d when all of the split library arguments were going on, but from what I can tell, a lot of the reasons for Tango disappeared when D2 was released. There is a small effort aimed at reviving Tango, but in my opinion having ...


7

RedBlackTree is Phobos' set implementation. The problem that you're running into with removeKey is the fact that it's variadic. It will take either an array of keys to remove or multiple keys (e.g. removeKey(arr) or removeKey(key1, key2, key3)). string is an array of immmutable chars, so it tries to instantiate removeKey with char instead of string, which ...


7

Use to from std.conv: int i = 15 string message = "Value of 'i' is " ~ to!string(i);


7

You should probably read this tutorial on ranges if you haven't. When a range will and won't be consumed depends on its type. If it's an input range and not a forward range (e.g if it's an input stream of some kind - std.stdio.byLine would be one example of this), then iterating over it in any way shape or form will consume it. //Will consume auto result = ...


7

Yes, it does. std.algorithm.endsWith works with strings as well as other arrays and ranges.


6

If your strings are constant (like in the example), you can use an associative array literal, but the syntax isn't pretty: if (str in ["first"[]:0, "second":0, "third":0]) I don't think there's a library call you can use in D1's Phobos, but D2's std.algorithm has something you could use: if (count(["first", "second", "third"][], str)) In Tango, you can ...


6

Looks like as of October they were moving toward compatibility, but I don't know what's happened since then... Edit: I also found this, which seems to indicate there are no plans to actually merge: There will be no changes to the situation for D1. However D2, as of version 2.020, has had Phobos split into 2 libraries, druntime.lib and ...


6

I don't know very much about the etc.c.curl API, which is just a binding to the C Curl library. A much easier to use D-style wrapper is currently in formal review, though, and will probably find its way into one of the next two Phobos/DMD releases. If you want to try it out in the mean time (with the understanding that there may be breaking changes to it ...


6

There are several subtleties in D that can make C code not behave exactly as you may want it to. For instance, integer promotion rules are not quite the same (but almost), and initialization rules are different (floating point values -- including arrays of such -- are initialized to NaN, for example). Further, C function pointer syntax was deprecated ...


6

Tiny bit of both, probably. The issue here is that ct is attempted to be evaluated at compile-time and produces result range that is used in run-time. I guess either CTFE or cartesianProduct does not expect such scenario and something bad happens that involves using invalid memory. I think it should have either work, or be a compile-time error, but that ...


6

Adam's solution works, although it uses a temporary copy of the elements. With a small modification to std.algorithm, it's possible to write a version which sorts the elements in-place: import std.algorithm; import std.stdio; import std.traits; import std.typecons; struct SortableRef(T) { private T * _p; @property ref T value() { return *_p; } ...


5

You seem to be mixing up C++ classes with D classes. D classes are always passed by reference (unlike, say, C++ classes), and PerformanceCounter t does not allocate the class on the stack, merely a pointer to it. This means that t is set to null because, well, null is the default initializer for pointers - hence the error. EDIT: You can think of D Foo ...



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