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7

Julia, It seems what you are looking for is n-grams, specifically Bigrams (also called collocations). Here's a chapter about finding collocations (PDF) from Manning and Schutze's Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing. In order to do this with Lucene, I suggest using Solr with ShingleFilterFactory. Please see this discussion for details.


5

Solr 3.X has an inbuilt Suggester component, which allows you to build suggestion on limited fields. The following links provide the implementation details - 1. http://lucidworks.lucidimagination.com/display/solr/Suggester 2. http://solr.pl/en/2010/11/15/solr-and-autocomplete-part-2/ For alternate approaches you can check EdgeNGrams implementation or ...


4

Don't reinvent the wheel. Use a full text search engine such as Lucene.


4

[...] is character class and character class can match only one character it specifies. For instance character class like [abc] can match only a OR b OR c. So if you want to find only word abc don't surround it with [...]. Another problem is that you are using \\s as word separator, so in following String String data = "foo foo foo foo"; regex \\sfoo\\s ...


3

the basic idea is simple -- in executable pseudocode, from collections import defaultdict def process(words): d = defaultdict(int) for w in words: d[w] += 1 return d Of course, the devil is in the details -- how do you turn the big collection into an iterator yielding words? Is it big enough that you can't process it on a single machine but ...


3

The simple/naive way is to use a hashtable. Walk through the words and increment the count as you go. At the end of the process sort the key/value pairs by count.


3

I know I'm late, but anyway, I’ve just uploaded an extension that does that: Language CSV Files Generator. It only extracts strings from .php and .phtml files, I have no idea of how to get the .xml ones. Hope that someone out there could share some idea. hope you like it


2

Here is some initial code that solves your problem. function CountWordSequences(const s:string; Counts:TStrings = nil):TStrings; var words, seqs : TStrings; nw,i,j:integer; t :string; begin if Counts=nil then Counts:=TStringList.Create; words:=TStringList.Create; // build a list of all words words.DelimitedText:=s; seqs:=TStringList....


2

You are referring to the Longest Common Subsequence problem. This is used as the basis of a string comparison. There are many SO questions relating to this problem: http://stackoverflow.com/search?q=longest+common+subsequence The algorithm isn't too hard to implement. Wikipedia has pseudocode that you can use as a starting point.


2

If you can be sure that they will appear in that order, if at all, then this should work: (<query 1>).*(<query 2>) E.g. (Average Latency \(last \d+ queries\)).*(Current QPS \(last \d+s, ignored \d+\)) You may need to check that the . operator matches newlines in your tool.


2

$('p').click(function (e) { var offset = $(this).offset(); var top = offset.top // list of phrases var phrases = ["success", "sweet man", "awesome"]; if ($('#placeBookmark').hasClass('placing')) { $('#placeBookmark').trigger('click') $('#bookmark').css({left: offset.left - 30, top: top}).show(); // Selects a random phrase from the ...


2

What you want to build is a N-gram model which consist in computing the probability for each word to follow a sequence of n words. You can use NLTK text corpora to train your model, or you can tokenize your own corpus with nltk.sent_tokenize(text) and nltk.word_tokenize(sentence). You can consider 2-gram (Markov model): What is the probability for "...


2

If I were you, I would just throw something together using boost::multi_index_container first, because then if you get even more requirements later it will be quite easy to extend it further. If later you measure and find that it is not performing adequately, then you can replace it with an optimized data structure.


1

The trie specified is suboptimal in numerous ways. For a start, it constructs multiple nodes per item inserted. As the author writes, "Every character of input key is inserted as an individual trie node." That's a horrible, and unnecessary penalty! The use of an ALPHABET_SIZE greater than 2 adds insult to injury here; not only would a phrase of fifty bytes ...


1

You can use the run-length encoding of X to split up the time series into consecutive elements with the same value: # Reproducible example X <- c(F, F, F, T, T, F) td <- c( "2000-01-31", "2000-02-29", "2000-03-31", "2000-04-30", "2000-05-31", "2000-06-30") library(zoo) na_ts = zoo(x=X, order.by=td) # Split with run-length encoding runlens <- rle(X)...


1

One simple modification is to pass word length to phrases method and then call the method with different word lengths. def phrases(words, wlen): phrase = [] for word in words: phrase.append(word) if len(phrase) > wlen: phrase.remove(phrase[0]) if len(phrase) == wlen: yield tuple(phrase) And then define all_phrases as ...


1

I mean technically as you've described you'd just be calculating 1/total_sentances*num_phrases which is equal to num_phrases/total_sentances, since each phrase is only 1 as I understand it. What you actually want to do is count the number of phrases in each sentence. You can then use numpy.mean on a list of phrase counts to find the average phrase count. I'...


1

Why not just use .? RewriteRule ^cat-([0-9]+),woj-([0-9]+),(.+)/?$ show_list_adverts.php?mode=searching&cat_id=$1&search_province=$2&search_city=$3 [L]


1

You can construct an expression that works for all those cases. Below, I show how to construct one in Perl (although you can just use the product for your purposes). use List::Util qw<reduce>; our ( $a, $b ); my $regex = "\n^\n( " . join( "\n| " , @{( reduce { my $r = ref( $a ) ? $a : [ "$a " ]; my $s = $...


1

The code below prints all the sub_phrases that you want to match. $phrase = 'I am searching for a text'; $\ = "\n"; @words = (); print "Indices:"; while( $phrase =~ /\b\w+\b/g ) { push @words, {word => $&, begin => $-[0], end => $+[0]}; } $num_words = $#words + 1; print 'there are ', $num_words, ' words'; for( $i=0; $i<$num_words; $i+...


1

There are different solutions to get the strings from CSV files of Magento: check the links The Ultimate Guide to Translating Magento (using Translation Memory software) and How to translate Magento using OmegaT software


1

Take a look in /app/locale/(language_country)/*.csv files.


1

There's no way to "guess" which is the correct way, you must have a knowledge base (i.e.: a dictionary). This dictionary can be implemented using pspell (aspell) as @Dominic mentioned, or you can have your own array as a dictionary. If you have an array as dictionary, you can use the Levenshtein algorithm, that is available as a function in php to ...


1

If your input is fairly simple and you have pspell installed, and the arrays are the same size: For each index in the two arrays you could explode the string on spaces, pspell_check each word, and the phrase with the highest percentage of words for which pspell_check returned true would be the phrase to keep. Sample code to get you started: function ...


1

Look into the Apriori algorithm. It can be used to find frequent items and/or frequent sets of items. Like the wikipedia article states, there are more efficient algorithms that do the same thing, but this could be a good start to see if this will apply to your situation.



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