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2

You're setting the position of the node directly, this bypasses collision detection. If you move fast, the next position can be on the other side of the wall (or close enough so that physics will resolve the collision by moving the dragged node outside and above the wall). Enabling usesPreciseCollisionDetection on the dynamic body may improve the situation ...


1

It's an interesting notion of updating some behavior via the UIInterpolatingMotionEffect, though I don't suspect it's designed for that. If you want to update behaviors based upon accelerometer information, I personally would have thought that the CMMotionManager is ideal for that purpose. The desired UX isn't entirely clear from the video clip, but it ...


1

I think your best bet is either to use timer.performWithDelay to call a function that will reposition the balls after the physics has had a chance to break the constraint. Remove each ball from physics, and use a delayed function cal (see item 1) to re-add them after having been repositioned.


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I resolved this issue by checking the _body SKSpriteNode's 'y' position in the scene's update method. If the 'y' position was below a certain limit, I applied an impulse to the body's physicsBody from below to stand it up again. This worked as required/desired. -(void)update:(CFTimeInterval)currentTime { if(_body.position.y < 30) { [self ...


1

I guess you are more interested in the speed and acceleration values instead of a curve fit of the original data, but you assume that it is easier to estimate speed and acceleration by differentiation of a mathematical function instead of working with real-world data? If my guess is correct let me tell you that there is a better way than a rough ...


1

By plotting the data, this looks polynomial. As such, I suggest you use the polyfit function. What this does is given a set of co-ordinates x and y, you specify what order of polynomial you believe the data best matches, and it finds the coefficients of the polynomial equation that best fits this data. This is performed by least-squares error ...


0

Thats really pro quesiton and its answer is given in unity forum by the eexpert user. Go and check this answer it will help you. http://answers.unity3d.com/questions/8715/how-do-i-use-layermasks.html


3

I'll start with a technique that is almost as simple as the Euler-Cromer integration you've been using but is markedly more accurate. This is the leapfrog technique. The idea is very simple: position and velocity are kept at half time steps from one another. The initial state has position and velocity at time t0. To get that half step offset, you'll need a ...


0

So i found a solution, it might not be the smartest, but it works, and it's pretty came to mind after reading both Eric's answer and also reading the comment made by marcus, you could say that it's a combination of the two: This is the new code: foreach (ExtTerBody OtherObject in UniverseController.CurrentUniverse.ExterTerBodies.Where(x => x != this)) ...


14

I am currently working on a project in C# where i play around with planetary gravitation This is a fun way to learn simulation techniques, programming and physics at the same time. One thing I cannot figure out is how to get the correct gravitational direction. I assume that you are not trying to simulate relativistic gravitation. The Earth isn't ...


0

I am not sure if I understand your idea correctly, but is there a reason why you are using transform.localPosition to detect velocity of the eyeball? It is the position relative to the parent transform which is probably staying zero all the time (you didn't post any code that would affect to it). If you want to find out how much the object is moving in world ...


0

UPDATED: Fixed with the below thanks to @0x141E -(void)characterJump { CGFloat radianFactor = 0.0174532925; CGFloat rotationInDegrees = _body.zRotation / radianFactor; CGFloat newRotationDegrees = rotationInDegrees + 90; CGFloat newRotationRadians = newRotationDegrees * radianFactor; CGFloat r = 500; CGFloat dx = r * ...


0

Ditch your contact normal. The vector Delta that you have at the start IS the collision normal when the object is a sphere. You'll have to normalize it, and probably negate it, but it's in the right direction. Not true in a general case of other shapes ...


0

You may create virtual PxScene which represents moving platform. Its space will be considered as local space of the platform, so children controllers won't be pushed at all. Moreover you may add colliders prevented controller to move outside boundary of the platform. Obviously, the disadvantage of the method above is using virtual scenes and multiple ...


1

I suggest that you follow Sprite Kit’s coordinate and rotation conventions. Specifically, your sprite image should be facing right at zero degrees (the default value), and a positive value is a counter-clockwise rotation. That said, here's one way to apply an impulse in the direction a sprite is facing: // Specify the force to apply to the SKPhysicsBody ...


0

You can get a node by its name: CCNode* node = [self getChildByName:@"someNodeName"]; Node and physics body have properties referencing each other. So if you have one or the other, you can get the other or the one: CCNode* node = bodyA.node; CCPhysicsBody* body = node.physicsBody; If you can find the node, you have access to the body. And vice versa.


0

For some reason, in order to move my sprite node I had to create it like this _torso = [SKSpriteNode spriteNodeWithColor:[SKColor blueColor] size:CGSizeMake(40, 60)]; rather than SKSpriteNode *torso = [SKSpriteNode spriteNodeWithColor:[SKColor blueColor] size:CGSizeMake(40, 60)]; Once I set a breakpoint and saw that _torso was nil, I referred to some ...


0

Assuming that you know the length and width of the rect, if the angle is pointing left or right, then x is known, so you only need to solve for y (r * sin(angle)); if the angle is pointing up or down, then y is known so you solve for x (r * cos(angle)). // where the center of the rect = 0, 0 and angles are in degrees 0..360 // determine the 45's first if ...


1

Here is some code that does what I said in comments modified for rectangular boxes. #include <stdio.h> #include <math.h> // Find intersection p between line A->B and box. // Point A must be the box center. // The box is [x_left, y_bottom, x_right, y_top]. void find_box_intersect(double *box, double *a, double *b, double *p) { double dx = ...


1

point3d getIntersection(point3d topfrontleft, point3d backbottomright, point3d externpt) { //find the middle point3d middle(topfrontleft/2+backbottomright/2); //slide box and source as if the "middle" was at the origin topfrontleft -= middle; backbottomright-= middle; externpt-= middle; //scale source as if the box is the unit ...


0

Short answer: Intersect the line with the (right) border of the box. Longer answer: x is easy: It's at the right border of the box. for y, solve this: y/line_height = (line_width - box_width/2) / line_width then add the y of the line lower point This is assuming the line intersects the right border, as in your picture. To figure which border the line ...


0

I know it's old, but I had the same Problem searching for Solutions on Google and I came up here, but realised it simplier than your Solution. I Realised it by writing: string dataDir = "C:\\Windows\\Fonts\\arial.ttf"; font = new Font(dataDir, 40); font.Bold = true; font2 = new Font(dataDir, 15); on Lines 97 - 100 on ...


1

Some of my code. # From angles.rb:<br> # eccentricity of elliptical Earth orbit around Sun # Horner calculation method def eccentricity_Earth( ta = A2000 ) ta = check_jct_zero( ta ) # 0.016708617 - ta[ 0 ] * ( 0.000042037 + ta[ 0 ] * 0.0000001235 ) [-0.0000001235, -0.000042037, 0.016708617].inject(0.0) {|p, a| p * ta[0] + a} end ...


0

If I were you: I would find the number of rope segments (Depending on height), there are between the player and the top of the screen (Y : 0px); thereby, allowing you to constantly update an integer; or appropriate size variable, with how many segments to draw. Then, every time you redraw, you can make the rope above the player. This would entitle deleting ...


0

My first guess is that the problem lies in that first if statement: if (direction == Direction.LEFT && moving) { getVelocity().x = -WALK_SPEED; } else if (getVelocity().x < 0) { getVelocity().x *= COEF_FRIC; } If the first thing is true, you're going to constantly be setting the velocity to walking pace, which doesn't make sense when ...


1

The following creates a composite object by joining two bodies: a circle and a weight. The weight is offset relative to the center of the circle and is much denser. When added to the scene, gravity rotates the combined object so the side with the weight is on the bottom. To use it 1) create a new sprite kit game, 2) replace the default initWithSize and ...


0

Your problem is that every time it needs to go right, it changes the direction. What you should do is something like this: position.x = position.x + playerVectorX; if(ballPong.getPosition().x < position.x){ System.out.println("left"); playerVectorX = Math.abs(playerVectorX); } if(ballPong.getPosition().x > ...


0

Why not just go with position.x = ballPong.getPosition().x; ?



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