Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

double numberOfSumElements = Math.Pow(10, presicion + 2); I'm going to talk about this strictly in practical software engineering terms, avoiding getting lost in the formal math. Just practical tips that any software engineer should know. First observe the complexity of your code. How long it takes to execute is strictly determined by this ...


6

I have found the solution myself! Here is how i wired it now: It works perfect! (The lines are Power cables and G = GPIO) -G4 - - - - - G4 - | | RPi1 -G18 - - G18- RPi2 | | -G23 - - - - G23- EDIT: Also here a image how i wired it:


6

No, this will not slow down the program, unless you are running on an incredibly underpowered 1MHz DSP chip that has to do floating point arithmetic in software as opposed to passing it off to a dedicated FPU. This would mean that any mathematical operations that use floating point data are much slower than just using integer arithmetic. In general, greater ...


6

As I noted in a comment, OCaml's float are boxed, which puts OCaml to a disadvantage compared to Clang. However, I may be noticing another typical rough edge trying OCaml after Haskell: if I see what your program is doing, you are creating a list of stuff, to then map a function on that list and finally fold it into a result. In Haskell, you could more or ...


5

I've also tried several variants, here are my conclusions: Using arrays Using recursion Using imperative loop Recursive function is about 30% more effective than array implementation. Imperative loop is approximately as much effective as a recursion (maybe even little slower). Here're my implementations: Array: open Core.Std let pi_approx n = let ...


5

Meeting C++ has an article on the different options for generating pi: C++ & π they discuss some of the options, from cmath, which is not platform independent: double pi = M_PI; std::cout << pi << std::endl; and from boost: std::cout << boost::math::constants::pi<double>() << std::endl and using atan, with constexpr ...


5

BigDecimal is immutable so the is no way to change it's value. (In the same way String does) This is why all the methods would operate on a BigDecimal return a new BigDecimal as the result e.g. pi = pi.add(numitor1); The second problem is you are using a double in your calculation, defeating the whole point of using a BigDecimal. The expression ...


5

The problem is that the Leibniz series for computing π converges EXTREMELY slowly. Using your program, I found that after 3663 iterations (when I killed the program), the values looked like this: pi=3.141865802997432 pi=3.1413195787723875 pi=3.1418656538577117 pi=3.1413197278306884 Still only 3 decimal places, and it is going to take a long time even ...


4

Your setter is wrong, so your radius stays 0, it should be public void setRadius(double rad) { radius = rad; }


4

Optimizing the code is changing somehow the algorithm (even if the formula is the same). You are doing some bignum arithmetic. Bignum algorithms are hard and clever. You should use a bignum library like GMPlib (which probably also profits from special carry-propagating machine instructions; the major gain is clever bignum arithmetic algorithms), it probably ...


4

The 4/j is entirely integer math, which means it will round down to an integer before being added. Some options are 4.0 / j and (double)4 / j. The MSDN has an article on C floating-point constants that explains the notation you should use to ensure a literal value is treated as a float or a double.


4

The number of digits in a macro definition almost certainly will have no effect at all on run-time performance. Macro expansion is textual. That means that if you have: #define PI 3.14159... /* 50 digits */ then any time you refer to PI in code to which that definition is visible, it will be as if you had written out 3.14159.... C has just three ...


4

This is a variation of Subset Sum Problem with fixed subset size. (You are facing the optimization problem). The existence solution (Is there a subset that sums exactly to pi) is discussed thoroughly in the thread: Sum-subset with a fixed subset size. In your problem (the optimization problem) - if you can repeat an element more than once - it is easily ...


4

I would like to add that although floats are boxed in OCaml, float arrays are unboxed. Here is a program that builds a float array corresponding to the Leibnitz sequence and uses it to approximate π: open Array let q_pi_approx n = let summand n = let m = float_of_int n in (-1.) ** m /. (2. *. m +. 1.) in let a = Array.init n summand in ...


4

Here is a rather simple way assuming some first year calculus. You can approximate functions by derivating them over and over and understanding their slope - and then building a polynomial around them such that the polynomial approximates their behavior well enough. If you keep doing this for as long as you can you get something called their taylor ...


4

The hardest part to remember is that the Y coordinates run downwards in DOM coordinates, and therefore angles run clockwise from the positive X axis: Given mouse position mx, my: var dx = mx - 180; // horizontal offset from center var dy = my - 180; // vertical offset from center var theta = Math.atan2(dy, dx); // angle ...


3

The maximum decimal places in javascript is limited to 15. So you cannot get more than 15 decimal places. But you can get up to 20 decimal places by doing but its not accurate Math.PI.toFixed(20); //3.14159265358979311600 That will give you a PI value with 20 decimal places. Note: 20 is the maximum and 0 is the minimum for toFixed(). So trying ...


3

In the paper the upper bound of O(n log^3(n)) bit complexity is presented for calculations of the digits of log(2). Since they present a more generic formula later on, which also covers pi, I would think that it won't differ much from the above upper bound. But I haven't verified that.


3

If you really want more precision (not just display more decimal places), you could consider using the GMP (Gnu Multi-precision) Library. You can specify the number of bytes to use for your doubles (8 bytes, 16 bytes, 32 bytes, 64 bytes, 128 bytes, ... ). The library is usually used for cryto algorithms (that need really large integers). ...


3

Your PiCalculation returns a double, you can't expect to have more precision with this. Use BigDecimal everywhere, if you want to go further. But anyway with this method, even with 10^10 throws, you will only have 10 decimals. The 49 decimals you had with your double, were due to the double lack of precision


3

You never change pi. Remember that BigDecimals are immutable, and you never change yours, i.e., you never assign it to a new value, and so you have to have somewhere pi = ... Inside your if/else would be a good place for this. if (plus) { pi = pi.add(new BigDecimal(4).divide(new BigDecimal(i), 2, BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP)); } else { pi = ...


3

You either need to assign two extra notes to the two spare numbers or represent the digits with something else, how about a rest or an accent for a note or some other effect?Or of course you could include semi tones, you would have to miss one out though as there are 11, or 12 including the octave of the first note.The nicest sounding thing would be assign ...


3

The series you are using: pi = 4(1 - 1/3 + 1/5 - 1/7 + 1/9 ...) converges REALLY slowly to pi. It is the evaluation of a Taylor series for 4arctan(x) at x=1 and converges conditionally (it is right on edge of the interval of convergence). That's not going to be a very numerically efficient way to compute pi. Beyond that, I haven't carefully checked your ...


3

To compute Pi to 4th decimal place, you could use Gauss-Legendre algorithm: #include <math.h> #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { const double PI = acos(-1), SQRT2 = sqrt(2.0); double a = 1, b = 1/SQRT2, t = .25, p = 1; double an, piold, pi = 1, eps = 1e-6; /* use +2 decimal places */ int iteration_count = 0; do { ...


2

There are only 10,000 possible sequences of four digits (0000 to 9999), so at some point you will have found that every sequence has been duplicated, and there's no need to process further digits. If you assume that pi is a perfectly uniform random number generator, then each new digit that's processes results in a new sequence, and after about 20,000 ...


2

It has to be y += 4 * ((-1)**(n - 1) / ((2 * n) + 1)) The last ) is missed in line 5: which is y += 4 * ((-1)**(n - 1) / ((2 * n) + 1)


2

You could sort the list of items, which requires O(n log(n) ) time. Then, given a+b+c, you can find the best d using binary search. You could also (possibly, depending on the data) cut the search tree by checking if the partial sum at any step is too large or too small to have a chance of becoming the correct solution. By taking these two steps you should ...


2

The function below calculates pi without relying on any libraries at all. Also, the type of its result is a template parameter. Platform ueber-independence is stifled a bit because it only works with fixed-precision fractional types -- the calculated value needs to converge and remain constant over 2 iterations. So if you specify some kind of ...


2

1 .if you want more bits computed per bpp call then you have to change your equation from 1/(16^k) base to bigger one you can do it by summing 2 iterations (k and k+1) so you have something like (...)/16^k + (...)/16^(k+1) (...)/256^k but in this case you need more precise int operations it is usually faster to use the less precise iterations 2.if you ...


2

I would add a line at the start if(k < 0) return 1/raisePi(n, -k);



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible