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1

You realize how big Long.MAX_VALUE / 8 is? It is (2^63 - 1) / 8 which is about 1e18... quite a big number (even whith todays best computers filling whole buildings it takes at least 1000s, see comment). The better approach would be to compare the previous calculated value with the current value for pi and compare them. If the difference is 0 (Happens ...


0

This is a quick and dirty implementation of Bellard's formula bigPi(200,2000) is good for over 500 decimal places in 75ms. public static BigDecimal bigPi(int max,int digits) { BigDecimal num2power6 = new BigDecimal(64); BigDecimal sum = new BigDecimal(0); for(int i = 0; i < max; i++ ) { BigDecimal tmp; BigDecimal term ; ...


0

You're setting numIncircle = 0 inside your for loop, effectively losing count each time. Occasionally it'll count the last one, so the approximation will be 1 / number of darts * 4. This will happen with frequency pi / 4 ≈ 0.78539816339. Here is my suggestion: import turtle import math import random fred = turtle.Turtle() fred.speed(0) fred.up() wn = ...


3

Directly using of java.lang.Math.PI is not interesting! :-) I suppose you are going to calculate parted sum of series such as, but forgot about cycle iteration. int limit=100; double v=0 for(int i=0;i<limit;i++){ v+=(1-2*i%2)/(2*i+1); } v*=4;


2

You need to use a loop in order to sum the terms that estimate pi. Consider doing something like this. double sum = 0; for (int j = 1; j <= i; j++) { sum = sum + Math.pow(-1, j+1)/(2*j-1); } //Note: the argument i in this function becomes the number of terms in the sum sum = 4*sum; Pi = sum; Summations in math are often converted to loop ...


-4

Use the java.lang.Math.PI directly.


0

Note that (k%2 == 0) will handle the case k == 0, so you don't need a special check for k == 0. Also that series converges very slowly, it's the first one in the following list of simple formulas for pi: pi/4 = arctan(1) pi/4 = arctan(1/2) + arctan(1/3) pi/4 = 4 * arctan(1/5) - arctan(1/239) pi/4 = 6 * arctan(1/8) + 2* arctan(1/57) + arctan(1/239)


0

Here is what I did to solve the problem. I had to change the conversion specification from %f to %.17g. Which gave me more precision than the default print value of float. // Print the result void printResult(){ //Returning the result up to 17 places after the decimal removing trailing zeros printf("\n" "The value of Pi using %d ...


0

This seems to produce the correct result: def m(num): answer = 0 for i in range(num): answer+=(-1)**i*1/(2.0*i+1.0) return answer for i in [1,101,201,301,401,501,601,701,801,901]: print i,"%.4f" % (4*m(i))


1

To add to Jakob's answer, your for loop starts at k=0, to estimate pi you have to start at k=1. I.e. change for k in range(num): to for k in range(1,num + 1):


3

Look closely at your iteration: for k in range(num): answer+=((-1)**(i+1)/(2*i-1)) You're iterating over k, but k appears nowhere in the loop body. That can't be right.


2

Try this code, manually computing Pi, the Madhava way. import math def myPi(iters): sign = 1 x = 1 y = 0 series = 0 for i in range (iters): series = series + (sign/(x * 3**y)) x = x + 2 y = y + 1 sign = sign * -1 myPi = math.sqrt(12) * series return myPi print(myPi(1000))


0

Judging from you question I feel like your are taking PHY324. ;) I am confused about the same thing. I have a code set up and I am no python expert but maybe this might help. import random from math import * number_of_points = 10000 points_in = [] points_outside = [] for i in range(number_of_points): rand_number1 = random.random() rand_number2 = ...


0

The prototype is: char *mpfr_get_str (char *str, mpfr_exp_t *expptr, int b, size_t n, mpfr_t op, mpfr_rnd_t rnd) There are two wrong things in your code: The array is not large enough. See the answer by squeamish ossifrage. But if you choose to use n equal to 0, it is better to let MPFR allocate the string (also suggested by Pavel Holoborodko in all ...



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