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0

You seem to be storing individual bits is separate structure members, and then packing them to word on the fly to be able to apply masks; but it is probably more efficient to pack them into a word, and use a mask to access the individual bits when necessary. The members i0, i1 etc. are probably unnecessary. It would be simpler to pack the bits directly into ...


1

Some things I think you need to know. Don't use bit fields. Apart from being non-portable, they make this kind of bit-twiddling harder, not easier. Don't use run-time shifts. Get the compiler to do your work. Do read code, study and practice. Learning bit-twiddling can be hard, and from your code I don't think you're quite there yet. If we're going to ...


0

According this documentation (page 109) that was mentioned in there.


1

As general recommendation: split your program by parts, devide the whole to by 2 or exclude function by function (calls). Probably start with simple loop usngined long i = 0; while (1) { printf("%x ",i); i++; } in order to be sure the watchdog timer pragma applied. Then exclude others. Otherwise you can only analyse code and docs.


1

int* readings[3] = {0,0,0}; is an array of pointers to integers... which is probably why you (int)readings[1] to stop the compiler whining at you. I cannot see a getOutput() so cannot see what it will do with getOutput(readings), but if it wants an array of pointers to int, then you are giving it three 0 pointers -- which may be bad. As noted elsewhere, ...


1

You have undefined behavior in your code, which will lead to weird things happening (most often crashes). The problem is your definition of the variable temp and how you use it. You use it as a string in your sprintf call, but it's defined as an array of strings.


0

Some of the pins may be configured as Analog Inputs. From the Datasheet for this device "The operation of pin RA4 as analog is selected by setting the ANS3 bit in the ANSEL register which is the default set-ting after a Power-on Reset". If you do not set the ANSEL register the pin cannot be used as output as it is configured as an analog input. ...


0

The best solution would be to redesign your hardware to combine all of the bits for the 7-segment display in one port. If this isn't possible, your best alternative is a function to do the mapping for you.


1

Flash memory cannot be really "empty" but it is either 0x0000, 0xFFFF (or unreadable if it has ECC bits - what the PIC16 does not have). Obviously on PIC16 "empty" Flash contains the value 0xFFFF. The instruction "ADDLW 0x1FF" is represented by this number so the CPU will interpret "empty" Flash memory as if it was filled with the instruction "ADDLW ...


2

The answer is that the crystal frequency defined at the top of the program was way beyond the real actual value #define _XTAL_FREQ 400000 //that's 400KHz INTOSC, impossible Instead it should be #define _XTAL_FREQ 4000000 //That's 4MHz INTOSC @Justin pointed it out in the comment below it's original post.


0

Reload the Timer as soon as it expires, the delay between timer overflow and rearm is affecting the total time. So this will solve your problem. void interrupt low_priority lowISR(void) { if (PIR1bits.TMR1IF) { PIR1bits.TMR1IF = 0; TMR1H = 0x3C; TMR1L = 0xAF; /* rest of the code here */ . . . . } ...


0

CREN is the Continuous Receive Enable Bit, which means that in a receive routine, in asynchronous mode, the receive buffer will always clears itself after it's full, allowing a continuous receive of UART characters. In synchronous mode, it's used for other purpose, which you may look at in your PIC'S datasheet.


0

Sorry, should also have mentioned: I'm not sure what ;movf Count,w ; in the Countcheck is for, but I'm assuming it's commented out on purpose. All the best - I hope you get it working. It sounds like a fun project. Matt


0

I'm fairly new to PICs so I don't know if my help is going to be useful. I thought that the command BTFSC, Status,C meant that the next command, GOTO REDLED, would be skipped if STATUS, C is 0 - i.e. if the result of Count-w is positive. However, there are a couple of things that strike me. Count will be positive if it is 7 or larger (ignoring the 0 ...


1

You can try different GPIO, because according to the documentation, GP2 may be controlled by the option register.


2

First, in order to use GP2 as an output, do you need to clear the T0CS in the OPTION register ? Second, I observe this in the manual: Note: A read of the ports reads the pins, not the output data latches. That is, if an output driver on a pin is enabled and driven high, but the external system is holding it low, a read of the port will indicate ...


2

Just to add to what KKrambo said you can use #define to articulate where each bit should go for instance #define ledA 0x01 #define ledB 0x02 ect... Then in the function (or before you call the function) you can write something like u_int8 ledS |= ledA; and so on


5

No you cannot use a union or struct to map the individual bits of a single byte to multiple memory mapped register addresses. However, you could create a function that receives the 8-bit byte as a parameter and then the function maps each individual bit to the appropriate port's register.


0

It seems that it's some sort of MPLAB X bug. In order to make the debugger work you have to close first the PIC Memory view, in case you were previously looking at variables. Here's my answer's source.


0

CREN - Continuous Receive Enable bit Asynchronous mode: 1 = Enables continuous receive 0 = Disables continuous receive Synchronous mode: 1 = Enables continuous receive until enable bit CRE N is cleared (CREN overrides SREN) 0 = Disables continuous receive Also take into account that CREN bit overrides SREN


1

That's the Continuous Receive Enable Bit, and you may want to set it up to 1. RCSTA2bits.CREN = 1; //Enable UART Receiver This enables the receiver in Asynchronous Mode. Oh, and you may want to initialize registers this way : RCSTA2 = 0b10010000; //Enable SPEN, CREN, no 9th bit This way, if you refer to the datasheet, you can compare the register ...


0

I solved the problem. I found out that the issue occurs after calling the disconnect() Normally when the input differs the password the disconnect() is called. I've noticed that when a new connection is made and the right password string is sent, two additional bytes are added to the beginning of the input string every single time. I made a simple debugging ...


1

When you declare: unsigned char array[10] = {'F','E','E','D','B','A','B','E','C','A',}; the compiler puts it into a proper digital representation according to the ASCII table (see it below). So on your device side it is like 0x46 for 'F', 0x45 for 'E' and etc. When you send it through the serial by passing by this array to TX function it will go to the ...


2

Instead of block = ((uint32*)data)[j]; which may have alignment problems, you can achieve the intended effect with: memcpy( &block, data + j, sizeof block ); Note that this is conceptually different to the version building it up from individual bytes. It depends on how your CPU represents integers (commonly called "endianness").


0

I added the following line, TXSTA = (0x4|0x20); to the receiver PIC code and it works now. There is no need for CREN = 1; SYNC = 0; SPEN = 1; as its setting the same bits.


3

The internal oscillator is a simple RC oscilator (a resistor/capacitor time constant determines its frequency), this kind of circuit may be accurate to only +/-10% over the operating temperature range of the device, and the device will be self-heating due to normal operating power dissipation. From the data sheet: An external crystal or other accurate ...


1

I assume you want to send/receive data with UART communication using micro controller such as 8051. So here are the things you should be looking at. 1) What is the Baud rate you want to send with? [Baud rate is number of symbols transmitted/received per second] 2) How many bits you want to receive per symbol? [Depends on how many bit micro controller do ...


3

There are some stuff in the datasheet you linked, "2.5.3 INTERNAL OSCILLATOR OUTPUT FREQUENCY AND TUNING", on p38 The datasheet says that "The INTOSC frequency may drift as VDD or temperature changes". Are VDD and temperature stable ? It notes three ways to deal with this by tuning the OSCTUNE register. The three of them would need an external "oscillator" ...


1

If what you are looking for is converting integers to ascii there is a standard compliant way to do it. sprintf(str, "%d", your_integer);


0

Recently I've had bad experience with PIC XC32 C compilers. My code compiles and works well with XC32 V1.20. When I switched to either V1.22 or V1.32, the code compiles without any error message, but no longer works. (XC32 V1.32 does complain that plib.h file is going to be obsolete)


0

Just to be sure that your TX function will work, use it this way : void vTxChar (unsigned char ucByte) { while (!TXIF); //Waits for previous transfer to be done TXREG = ucByte; //Loads TXREG with your value } This while loop checks the transmit interrupt flag (even if not set) to see if the TXREG is empty or still set with previous value. ...


0

TX1STA = 0b00100100; This enablex TX (TXEN=1) and high baud rate (BRGH = 1) RC1STA = 0b10000000; This enable the serial port (SPEN = 1) The only important missing part is your Clock setting and the baudrate you want to have. I saw 4000000 in the formula, means 4MHz, and /9600, so assume 9600BDS). Result = 0x25. SPBRGL = 0x25; SPBRGH = 0; This way, ...


0

By default at reset all pins on PIC16F1704 are set as analog. So clear coresponding bits of RX and TX pins in registers ANSELA, ANSELB and ANSELC to set tham as digital.


0

You look to be using asynchronous mode with SYNC = 0, but do not set TXEN = 1. Setting CREN = 1 only overrides TXEN in synchronous mode. Try setting TXEN = 1.


0

Here is your code below with debug output added. In main cycle it is running a bit out of array (on purpose) over the memory that it occupies and it works fine so far (it might be still platform incompatible though). I am pretty sure your foo() is OK and compiler is too, but you probably wrongly call it. Check all addresses and values with debug output and ...


0

I was missing the following, adding them fixed my issue. I found them here. IPR1bits.TMR1IP = 0; // Timer 1 -> Low priority interrupt group PIE1bits.TMR1IE = 1; // Enable Timer1 interrupt RCONbits.IPEN = 1; // Enable interrupt system priority feature INTCONbits.GIEH = 1; // Enable high priority interrupts ...


1

Are you actually setting timer 1 to use the low-priority interrupt, and are you enabling interrupt priority control (by default, IIRC, all interrupts use high priority regardless of the individual-interrupt-source priority bit).


4

I think this is an alignment problem. If data is not at an even address (e.g. because it is in fact an array of bytes), accessing it 32bit-wise could be not possible on your platform. The C standard (ISO/IEC 9899:1999, 6.3.2.3) says: A pointer to an object or incomplete type may be converted to a pointer to a different object or incomplete type. If ...


0

It looks like the read functions gets data wrongly. Seems interrupts disabled. It's recommended to enable IRQs and receive data by interrupts. Otherwise you will have data loss. Anyway it is helpful to compare 1. what the device gets physically and 2. what dropped to memory after read function worked. watch by oscilloscope - it is short sequence of ...


1

strcmp() returns different value with the same input No it does not. When presented with identical inputs, strcmp() will return identical output. Clearly you are not passing identical inputs to the different calls to strcmp(). You'll need to do some debugging to inspect the values and so find out where they differ.


1

you can do a strlen(input) to see if there are invisible symbols behind or compare the arrays value by value to see where the difference is. Also strncmp(input, password, strlen(password)); might help. This would ignore all symbols behind the length of password which will make abcd a valid password, so be afraid of this.


0

You can define your pins and use the predefined names instead. It's a lot more easier. For example: #define front_sensor PORTE.F0 #define left_sensor PORTE.F1 #define right_sensor PORTE.F2 or unsigned char sensor = PORTE.F0;


3

Probably UART1_Read_Text() doesn't behave as expected. I looked for documentation/source for that (non-standard) function, but failed to find any. Make sure it properly terminates input with a '\0' character when the user presses return.


0

I suggest you to start with modifiing the example codes. Here is the link: http://www.microchip.com/DevelopmentTools/ProductDetails.aspx?PartNO=dm164130-9 There is a link "PICkit 3 Starter Kit Source Code" with a lot of examples in assembler and C.


1

If you have to flash your PIC16F877A device rather that just simulate it on PC, you should run: MPLAB IPE then select family and device: finally select you tool depending on what you have on your table, as per list of all it can be: and then press the Program button. You may need to setup a minor number of additional options what suit your ...


0

From the PIC24FV32KA304 datasheet: The pull-downs are enabled separately, using the CNPD1 and CNPD2 registers, which contain the control bits for each of the CN pins. Setting any of the control bits enables the weak pull-downs for the corresponding pins. Therefore, since you never actually enable the weak pull downs, your pin may never come down ...


1

This may be the result of the lack of exception handling. You enable interrupts but you have no function to catch them. If for any reason, an interrupt flag would be set, there is nothing to clear it and your pic will branch to the interrupt vector since GIE is set (even if in sleep). Since you have not specified an interrupt function, you may (depending on ...



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