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The problem is here: pid_t child = fork(); //Creating child 3 if (new_pid < 0) { ... you keep checking `new_pid` here on down, ... but you should be checking `child` here on down... Also in onePipeSplit you need to put a NULL at the end of both command lists because execvp needs that. ...


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Posix Threads are the simplest and canonical way to do this. Wikipedia has got a nice example already. Basically, you create thread instances by means of pthread_create() and join them thereafter or "wait for them to finish" via pthread_join(). Note that the Wikipedia entry also says something about compilation using gcc. The -pthread or -lpthread is ...


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Separate processes have their own separate memory space (unless you do something special like shared memory, etc.). Whatever updates to heap or stack structures you do in the child process (such as modifying the history), has no effect in the parent. You are creating a child with fork(), then reading the user input in the child. The child updates its own ...


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This sounds a little like an XY problem, but one option may be to spawn a shell with the shell command and then ask for the parent PID: - name: get pid of playbook shell: | echo "$PPID" register: playbook_pid This will give you the PID of the python process that is executing the playbook.


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You might have two errors: You're using strtol() without checking that there's an argv[1]. You should put in a guard. You aren't using fgets() correctly. The first argument must be a buffer that you allocate yourself, as in: char line[200]; char *cp = fgets(line, 150, fp); After that cp will be either 0 (when fgets() couldn't read anything) or it will ...


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TL;DR The $$ variable is a special variable. It returns the PID of the invoking shell, which may not be the same as the current shell's PID as stored in $BASHPID. Neither variable has anything to do with PIDs from processes in your pipeline. The Bash manual says: ($$) Expands to the process ID of the shell. In a () subshell, it expands to the process ID ...


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A .tac file is intended to be a description of a service that can be run; whereas the options to twistd are options about how to run a service. Therefore it doesn't make sense to put the pidfile filename, or the logging configuration, or anything like that, into a .tac file. In this case, the .pid file has already been written by the time your .tac file is ...


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With the edit, under linux, you're looking at: childpid = fork(); if (childpid) { execve("program", argvp, envp); } else { int status; pid_t pid = wait(&status); } under windows, you need to use CreateProcess to create the process, and then use WaitForSingleObject to wait for the process to terminate; e.g. PROCESS_INFORMATION ...


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Under Linux, a parent process can wait for a child process to terminate by using the wait or waitpid system call. For more finer process synchronization, use semaphores.



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