Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

49

I found this extremely useful when developing my applications. As it gives you an alternative to simply re-queuing your messages. This can easily reduce the complexity of your code, and is one of many powerful hidden features in RabbitMQ. Steps First we need to set up two basic channels, one for the main queue, and one for the delay queue. In my example at ...


27

Fixed by adding: import logging logging.basicConfig()


14

Unacknowledged messages are those which have been delivered across the network to a consumer but have not yet been ack'ed or rejected -- but that consumer hasn't yet closed the channel or connection over which it originally received them. Therefore the broker can't figure out if the consumer is just taking a long time to process those messages or if it has ...


12

The main problem with your script is that it is interacting with a single channel from both your main thread (where the ioloop is running) and the "Broker" thread (calls submitData in a loop). This is not safe. Also, SimpleReconnectionStrategy does not seem to do anything useful. It does not cause a reconnect if the connection is interrupted. I believe this ...


10

No. Pika is an AMQP library. If you want to manage an MQ Broker, then you need an MQ Broker management tool. Fortunately, RabbitMQ comes with such a tool if you install a recent version of RabbitMQ such as 2.7.1 and you install the RabbitMQ management plugins. That gives you a web GUI as well as a RESTful API that you can use in your scripts. But it's ...


9

The problem probably is that you're setting no_ack=True like this: consumer_tag = channel.basic_consume( message_delivery_event, no_ack=True, queue=queue, ) And then acknowledging the messages: channel.basic_ack(delivery_tag=args.delivery_tag) You have to chose if you want to acknowledge or not and set the correct consume parameter.


8

With autoack flag unset, if your application failed during message processing all received messages will be lost. If such situation is quite rare and message lose is appropriate option in your application (for example, but no limited to, logs processing) you may turn autoack off. And yes, having autoack unset requires simpler broker logic, so it utilize ...


7

You can attach a timeout call-back function on the opened connection. Here is the extra code for your example. timeout = 60 def on_timeout(): global connection connection.close() connection.add_timeout(timeout, on_timeout)


6

I have tested the code on my machine, with the latest version of Pika. It works fine. There are threading issues with Pika, but as long as you create one connection per thread it shouldn't be a problem. If you are experiencing issues, it is most likely because of a bug in an older version of Pika, or an unrelated issues with your threading causing an issue. ...


6

I believe the answer to your problem is the Mandatory flag in RabbitMQ: This flag tells the server how to react if a message cannot be routed to a queue. Specifically, if mandatory is set and after running the bindings the message was placed on zero queues then the message is returned to the sender (with a basic.return). If mandatory had not been set ...


6

Queues bindings can be added and removed at runtime without any impact on clients, unless clients manually modify bindings. So if your question only about bindings just change them via CLI or web management panel and skip what written below. It's a common problem to make back-incompatible changes, especially in heterogeneous environment, especially when ...


5

When using Pika the channel.confirm_delivery() flag needs to be set before you start publishing messages. This is important so that Pika will confirm that each message has been sent successfully before sending the next message. This will however increase the time it takes to send messages to RabbitMQ, as delivery needs to be confirmed before the program can ...


5

What pika provides is just a small piece of what Celery is doing. Pika is Python library for interacting with RabbitMQ. RabbitMQ is a message broker; at its core, it just sends messages to/receives messages from queues. It can be used as a task queue, but it could also just be used to pass messages between processes, without actually distributing "work". ...


5

For now, your best bet is to turn off heartbeats, this will keep RabbitMQ from closing the connection if you're blocking for too long. I am experimenting with pika's core connection management and IO loop running in a background thread but it's not stable enough to release.


5

The SelectConnection is useful if your application architecture can benefit from an asynchronous design, e.g. doing something else while the RabbitMQ IO completes (e.g. switch to some other IO etc) . This type of connection uses callbacks to indicate when functions return. For example you can declare callbacks for on_connected, on_channel_open, ...


4

I appear to have solved this by moving where basic_qos is called. Placing it just after channel = connection.channel() appears to alter the behaviour to what I'd expect.


4

Pika is not ideally suited to use with gevent because pika implements its own asynchronous connection to RabbitMQ based on non-blocking sockets. This just does not fit well with gevent's implementation of the same. You may want to consider using py-amqplib or kombu


4

I was just looking into this as well. After reading through the source and docs I came across the following in channel.py: @property def consumer_tags(self): """Property method that returns a list of currently active consumers :rtype: list """ return self._consumers.keys() My own testing was successful. I used the following where my ...


4

There is a concept of heartbeats. It's basically a way how the server can make sure that the client is still connected. when you do time.sleep( body.count('.') ) You blocking the code by N number of seconds. It means that if server would like to send a heartbeat frame to check if your client is still alive, then it will not get a response back, because ...


4

Yes, it is possible. From official documentation The maximum length of a queue can be limited to a set number of messages by supplying the x-max-length queue declaration argument with a non-negative integer value. AFAIK, pika's channel.queue_declare has queue_declare has arguments argument which is definitely what you want.


4

FYI, how to do this in Spring 3.2.x. <rabbit:queue name="delayQueue" durable="true" queue-arguments="delayQueueArguments"/> <rabbit:queue-arguments id="delayQueueArguments"> <entry key="x-message-ttl"> <value type="java.lang.Long">10000</value> </entry> <entry key="x-dead-letter-exchange" ...


4

The answer to "what is the best way" depends heavily on your usage pattern of queues and what you mean by "best". Since I can't comment on questions yet, I'll just try to suggest some possible solutions. In each example I'm going to assume exchange is already declared. Threads You can consume messages from two queues on separate hosts in single process ...


3

This is because you are trying to authenticate using the username and password guest remotely. Starting with RabbitMQ 3.3 you need to create a new account to use remotely, and guest/guest can only be used locally. This is taken from the change log here. 25603 prevent access using the default guest/guest credentials except via localhost since (1.0.0)


3

This: http://lists.rabbitmq.com/pipermail/rabbitmq-discuss/2011-April/012223.html explains the problem well. The problem is that you write much faster than consume from the queue. And the warning just tells you about that. You can tune: connection.set_backpressure_multiplier(NNNN) but this will not solve the problem, just will hide the warnings for some ...


3

You need to set the consumer prefetch to 1 (https://kombu.readthedocs.org/en/latest/reference/kombu.transport.pyamqp.html#kombu.transport.pyamqp.Connection.Channel.basic_qos), that way each consumer will just grab 1 message, and leave the rest in the queue with the state ready, so if you have 2 consumers with QOS set to 1 and you have 100 messages you will ...


3

A common problem with Pika is that it is currently not handling incoming events in the background. This basically means that in many scenarios you will need to call connection.process_data_events() periodically to ensure that it does not miss heartbeats. This also means that if you sleep for a extended period of time, pika will not be handling incoming ...


3

What you are/were looking for is the 'shovel' plugin. The shovel plugin comes built into the core but you have to explicitly enable it. It's really easy to use as it does everything for you (no manually consuming/republishing to another queue). Enable shovel plugin via cli: sudo rabbitmq-plugins enable rabbitmq_shovel If you manage RabbitMQ via GUI, ...


3

Nevermind, all I had to do was print prop.headers


3

The counter part of basic_consume is basic_cancel. basic_cancel will fire the provided on_basic_cancel_ok callback function when rabbitmq has done the cancelation. Be prepared for a short period where you may still receive some messages. see: Pika Channel


3

It's not really when "your client... is delivering messages too fast", but when any client is delivering messages too fast. RabbitMQ monitors the amount of memory it's using and will exert backpressure when it goes over a certain fraction of the physical memory on the machine. By default this fraction is 0.4, but it can be changed. See ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible