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45

Okay, let's go through one by one: I'm looking to extract pitches from a sound signal. Although I am not an expert and have had minimal formal training, I think I know the best answer to this problem. I've done a lot of searching, reading, and experimenting over the past few years. My consensus is that the autocorrelation method is by far the best ...


28

Frequency (an objective metric) is not the same as pitch (a subjective quantity). In general, pitch detection is a very tricky problem. Assuming you just want to graph the frequency response for now, you have little choice but to use the FFT, as it is THE method to obtain the frequency response of time-domain data. (Well, there are other methods, such as ...


23

Taking a step back... To get this working you MUST figure out a way to plot intermediate steps of this process. What you're trying to do is not particularly hard, but it is error prone and fiddly. Clipping, windowing, bad wiring, aliasing, DC offsets, reading the wrong channels, the weird FFT frequency axis, impedance mismatches, frame size errors... who ...


12

you can use dirac-2 from dsp dimension for pitch shifting on the iphone. quote: - "DIRAC2 is available as both a commercial object library offering unlimited sample rates and phase locked multichannel support and as a free single channel, 44.1/48kHz LE version."


12

I found several open source implementations of real-time pitch tracking dywapitchtrack uses a wavelet-based algorithm Realtime C# Pitch Tracker uses a modified autocorrelation approach aubio (mentioned by piem; several algorithms are available) There are also some pitch trackers out there which might not be designed for real-time, but may be usable that ...


11

It sounds like you may have an interpretation problem with your FFT output. A few random points: the FFT has a finite resolution - each output bin has a resolution of Fs / N, where Fs is the sample rate and N is the size of the FFT for notes which are low on the musical scale, the difference in frequency between successive notes is relatively small, so you ...


10

Fast Fourier Transform doesn't need to know more then the input bytes you have. Don't be scared off by the Wikipedia article. An FFT algorithm will take your input signal (with the common FFT algorithms the number of samples is required to be a power of 2, e.g. 256, 512, 1024) and return a vector of complex numbers with the same size. Because your input ...


9

Semitones are equal ratios. So, if your sample is C, C# will be the 12th root of two. If you count semitones C=0, C#=1 etc, the ratio is pow(2.0, n*1.0/12.0) Works for negative numbers, too. I should note, this is not strictly true in every tuning scheme... but this is a good start. If you really care about the full complexities of musical tuning, I ...


8

use the soundtouch open source project to change pitch Here is the link : http://www.surina.net/soundtouch/ Once you add soundtouch to your project, you have to give the input sound file path, output sound file path and pitch change as the input. Since it takes more time to process your sound its better to modify soundtouch so that when you record the ...


7

Andre Michelle has a great article on Pitch control with actionscript 3.0


7

Use a language specialised for computer music and dsp, otherwise you'll be reinventing the wheel. Supercollider - supercollider.sourceforge.net Pure data - puredata.info ChucK - chuck.cs.princeton.edu


7

If anyone is still interested, I have written .Net wrapper class for SoundTouch library. http://code.google.com/p/soundtouchnet/


7

One way is to keep a floating point index into the original wave, and mix interpolated samples into the output wave. //Simulate scratching of `inwave`: // `rate` is the speedup/slowdown factor. // result mixed into `outwave` // "Sample" is a typedef for the raw audio type. void ScratchMix(Sample* outwave, Sample* inwave, float rate) { float index = 0; ...


7

Take a look at the "Elephant" paper in Nosredna's answer to this (very similar) SO question: How do you do bicubic (or other non-linear) interpolation of re-sampled audio data? Sample implementations are provided starting on page 37, and for reference, AShelly's answer corresponds to linear interpolation (on that same page). With a little tweaking, any of ...


6

The best language is most likely the one you know best, as long as it's a good multipurpose language that provides easy access to audio (microphone/speaker) hardware. Visual Basic, C#, C++, Java are all quick and easy to write, and give you great access to hardware etc. But ultimately, audio processing is very straightforward, and recording/playback APIs ...


6

A Cepstum (or Cepstral analysis) and Harmonic Product Spectrum are two well studied algorithms that estimate the exciter frequency from an overtone series. If the sequences of overtones are appropriately spaced, than a Cepstrum (FFT of the log of the FFT peaks) may be useful in estimating the period of the frequency spacing, which can then be used to ...


6

I found what I was looking for, Rotational Matrices. I was using Euler angles (roll, pitch, yaw) for the pitch and roll. When the phone is on end 90 degrees, the x and z plain are the same and the phone goes crazy, a fundamental flaw with Euler angles. I need to get the pitch and roll degrees using Rotational Matrices via getRotationMatrix Here it is for ...


5

The answer is that SoundTouch can do what you want to do. Take a look at the example program SoundStretch. It gives examples of using the SoundTouch library to change the tempo(without changing the pitch) as well as changing the pitch (without changing tempo) and playback rate(change both pitch and tempo). I would look through the source code and use what ...


5

Pitch is a human psycho-perceptual phenomena. Peak frequency content is not the same as either pitch or pitch class. FFT and DFT methods will not directly provide pitch, only frequency. Neither will zero crossing measurements work well for human voice sources. Try AMDF, ASDF, autocorrelation or cepstral methods. There are also plenty of academic papers ...


5

What's wrong with your existing technique that you're interested in a new one? I don't think a cepstrum is going to give you more accurate pitch, if that's the goal. It will, however, help you with suppressed fundamentals. I suppose you could use the cepstrum to get you close, then go back to the first FFT (which I would keep in its original form) and ...


5

and 2: iOS 5.0 simplifies this task. CMMotion manager has new method: - (void)startDeviceMotionUpdatesUsingReferenceFrame:(CMAttitudeReferenceFrame)referenceFrame As reference frame you can use this values: CMAttitudeReferenceFrameXMagneticNorthZVertical for magnetic north, CMAttitudeReferenceFrameXTrueNorthZVertical for true north. If you want to ...


5

See my answer here for getting smooth FREQUENCY detection: http://stackoverflow.com/a/11042551/1457445 As far as snapping this frequency to the nearest note -- here is a method I created for my tuner app: - (int) snapFreqToMIDI: (float) frequencyy { int midiNote = (12*(log10(frequencyy/referenceA)/log10(2)) + 57) + 0.5; return midiNote; } This ...


4

you can try to use SCListener. It's a small open-source class and very easy to use EDIT: The formatter does not like the _ in the name. Here is the link. http://github.com/stephencelis/sc_listener


4

I had a similar problem with microphone input on a project I did a few years back - turned out to be due to a DC offset. Make sure you remove any bias before attempting FFT or whatever other method you are using. It is also possible that you are running into headroom or clipping problems. Graphs are the best way to diagnose most problems with audio.


4

alSourcePlayv allows you to play multiple sources concurrently - the maximum number of sources is platform dependent, but is 32 on iOS (answered on the apple core-audio list, here for completeness)


4

The efficient way to do autocorrelation is with an FFT: FFT the time domain signal convert complex FFT output to magnitude and zero phase (i.e. power spectrum) take inverse FFT This works because autocorrelation in the time domain is equivalent to power spectrum in the frequency domain. Having said that, bare bones autocorrelation is not a great way to ...


4

Your formula p = 69 + 12 * log2(f / 440) is for converting a frequency in Hz to a musical note (the MIDI note number). For this though you need f, the frequency of the note in Hz, which is a little trickier to determine. For a pure tone (sinusoid) with no noise it's relatively straightforward, otherwise you'll need to look at using an FFT or other method to ...


4

I just found the answer to both of them after lots of trial and errors.... I am posting you the working code for both of them. Recording the Audio from Mic. import java.io.File; import java.io.IOException; import android.app.Activity; import android.content.ContentResolver; import android.content.ContentValues; import android.content.Intent; import ...


4

Notes are not present in a wav file. Sampled sound is. Humans might perceive some notes that might have been played to create the sound in some wav file, but doing automatic polyphonic pitch estimation/recognition from recorded sound into transcribed music for rich and complex waveforms, such as produced by guitars, still appears to be an advanced ...


4

There is a huge difference between the most powerful frequency component in a spectrum and the perceived pitch by a human listener. This academic paper is probably the definitive review of approaches to solving some of the problems of pitch detection, but does not address the perceptual issues you will need to deal with using real signals. At the very ...



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