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2

This will work; from gi.repository import Gtk from gi.repository.GdkPixbuf import Pixbuf from gi.repository import Gio import urllib2 url = 'http://lolcat.com/images/lolcats/1338.jpg' response = urllib2.urlopen(url) input_stream = Gio.MemoryInputStream.new_from_data(response.read(), None) pixbuf = Pixbuf.new_from_stream(input_stream, None) image = ...


2

If you are using Gdk 3, you're in luck as this should work: my_pixbuf = Gdk.pixbuf_get_from_surface (surface, x, y, w, h);


2

Such extreme scaling is generally bad for OCR, particularly in full color and with special processing (antialiasing) I would: upscale less (none?), or use NEAREST convert to grayscale immediately after loading (to avoid the artifacts you're seeing): image = image.convert('L')


2

If you pass IntPtr.Zero to the GetIter method, that should be the same as passing NULL to the C method. This API is a little lacking in the binding, to be honest, as the start_time parameter is supposed to be a GTimeVal which is unbound in glib-sharp as yet. You could certainly file a bug for this and we can extend the API. We could probably use a ...


2

You only modify the local pointer pixbuf: in fact passed->pix is NULL throughout the code. You should either not use a local pointer at all (and just refer to passed->pix) , or alternatively set the structs pointer equal to the local pointer at some point after initializing it.


1

I changed the code to make the variable step dependant on the proportion between the available pixels to plot and the interval lenght of the data do be plot. This way, if the window has only, say, 1000 pixels, a "slice" of the whole interval will be taken, which have only 1000 sample values. The result is not so smooth, but it's quite fast, and if one wants ...


1

Turns out that the way to do this was first to create a Context, then use the Gdk.CairoHelper method Gdk.CairoHelper.SetSourcePixbuf(Context, Pixbuf, 0, 0) To transfer the Pixbuf into an existing ImageSurface. A more elaborated example is as follows: private void Example(Pixbuf pb) { ImageSurface imgSurface = new ImageSurface(Format.RGB24, ...


1

It turns out that the code above is exactly correct... I just wasn't drawing anything to the surface. Works great!


1

I triggered the same problem in this manner: gw = gtk_widget_get_window(GTK_WIDGET(GLOBALS->mainwindow)); if(gw) { gdk_drawable_get_size(gw, &w, &h); cm = gdk_drawable_get_colormap(gw); if(cm) { dest = gdk_pixbuf_new(GDK_COLORSPACE_RGB, FALSE, 8, w, h); if(dest) { ...


1

I think what you want is composite(). It's somewhat inconvenient to use because it handles the coordinates differently, but something like this should make it work exactly like copy_area: def copy_area_composite(source_buf, source_x, source_y, width, height, dest_buf, dest_x, dest_y): source_buf.composite(dest_buf, dest_x, dest_y, width, height, ...


1

The PyGTK FAQ has a few tips for this. The most important seems to be that you should freeze the treeview/iconview and unset its model temporarily while adding a lot of entries. treeview.freeze_child_notify() treeview.set_model(None) # Add rows to the model # ... treeview.set_model(model) treeview.thaw_child_notify() The trick using g_idle_add is also ...


1

The answer is actually quite easy: when you render the objects, render them to a context created from a saved surface. Then when you render the window, insert a context based on the same saved surface. Create a surface: surface = new Cairo.ImageSurface(Cairo.Format.Argb32, width, height); Render a shape to the surface: using (Cairo.Context g = new ...



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