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18

gl_Color means different things in different places. In the vertex shader, gl_Color represents the primary per-vertex color attribute passed by the user. This is set using glColor* calls or array data fetched by glColorPointer. In the fragment shader, gl_Color represents the interpolated color for the facing of the triangle being rendered. Remember that ...


16

ShaderToy is a tool for writing pixel shaders. What are pixel shaders? If you render a full screen quad, meaning that each of four points is placed in one of the four corners of the viewport, than the fragment shader for that quad is called pixel shader, because you could say that now each fragment corresponds to exactly one pixel of the screen. So pixel ...


15

After some more web searching, I discovered the piece I was missing. According to an article on MSDN: "WPF uses pre-multiplied alpha everywhere internally for a number of performance reasons, so that's also the way we interpret the color values in the custom pixel shader." So the fix turns out to be to throw in a multiplication by alpha: float4 ...


15

Old thread but in case anyone is coming here from Google ... Passing in a texture to generate noise is (usually) over engineered. There are times where it is handy but for the majority of the cases it is simpler and faster to just calculate a random number. Since shader variables are independent per fragment they are unable to re-use existing variables ...


12

Setting a texture on the GPU takes some CPU time, but it is reasonably small in comparison to the actual batch cost. More importantly, it should have no impact at all on the actual shader execution, if the shader never references it. Now, there are three ways that branching can be handled: First of all, if the branch condition is always going to be the ...


8

You need to use MRT (Multiple Render Targets) to render this in one pass. You can bind both targets as output using OMSetRenderTargets http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ff476464(v=vs.85).aspx There's an example in http://hieroglyph3.codeplex.com/ (DefferedRendering) which then shows how to write to both textures at once. Just ...


7

Vertex shaders are simple to understand, you organize the vertices of an object in uniform data structures that relate information about it, like position and texture coordinates, and then pass each vertex into the shader to be converted from 3d to 2d by way of trasformation matrices. After this, primitives (triangles or multiples of triangles) are ...


6

One practical thing that pixel shader effects enable ... are blend modes. Check out Robby Ingebretsen's post on the matter (which discusses a useful way to take advantage of the linear burn blend mode). There is also a StackOverflow question on this subject as well. In fact, I actually have written a blend mode library for WPF & Silverlight, and make ...


6

I've used pixel shaders in different contexts. Mostly to wow users. Here are two examples from me. Genie effect in Silverlight/WPF: live demo Webcam support in Silverlight 4 gives you endless fun, when you combine it with shaders. I surprised a conference attendees with Bill Gates face, appearing on white surfaces. I set a flashlight next to webcam ...


6

Rendering to an offscreen surface is generally less constrained than rendering directly to a back buffer. The only constraints that come with using an offscreen surface with D3DImage is that it must be in a 32-bit RGB/ARGB format (depending on your platform). Other than that, all that the hardware has to offer is at your disposal. In fact, tons of shader ...


6

There is a much simpler solution that doesn't use shaders: load the image as a texture, create a mipmap chain and read back the value of the last mipmap (1x1 pixel). This trick is used in games extensively to calculate, for example, the average brigthness of a scene (in order to apply HDR tonemapping). It's a great trick if you value simplicity and ...


6

You don't need pixel shaders and GPU to speed this up. Use LockBits. Bob Powell has a good tutorial on doing exactly what you want.


5

First of all - if your shader doesn't have an entry point, you're not actually compiling anything! HLSL functions (it sounds like that is what you are working with) are inlined starting from the entry point. If you have no entry point, then what you've got is an empty shader. (You could confirm this by disassembling the resulting shader after you compile ...


5

What you generally do when you want a random value in a pixel shader is to pass in a texture containing noise. While it's not actually "random" - it looks random. For example, here's some code from a pixel shader I have lying around: float3 random = (tex2D(noiseTexture, texCoord * noiseScale + noiseOffset)); The texture I use is an RGB-noise texture, ...


5

Few bits and pieces also, you have x,y for light center + screen width /height. Replacing by : float2 light; float2 screenResolution; Then in your code: float2 delta = (light - texCoord.xy) * screenResolution; Should remove 2 more instructions. Next is the use of atan2, which is likely to be the most hungry one. You can declare another float2 ...


4

Texture coordinates conventionally reach from (0,0) (bottom left) to (1,1) (top right), so in fact, they are floats. So if you have texturecoordinates (u,v), the "original" coordinates are computed by (u*textureWidth, v*textureHeight). If the resulting values are not integral numbers, there may be different ways to handle that: just take floor or ceil ...


4

There's a great article by Rod Stephens on DevX that shows how to use System.Drawing to create the WPF effects (the ones that used to exist, such as Bevel) and more. You've gotta register to view the article though, it's at http://www.devx.com/DevXNet/Article/45039. Downloadable source code too.


4

As Andrew notes, the framebuffer access is logically a separate stage from the fragment shader, so reading the framebuffer in the fragment shader is impossible. The reason for this (to answer Andrew's question) is a combination of performance and the ordering requirements of the graphics pipeline. The way the rendering pipeline is defined, framebuffer ...


4

The first texture is set in the GraphicsDevice.Textures array with the index 0. so you have to do this: GraphicsDevice.Textures[0] = null;


4

A couple of suggestions You could use a 1D sampler (as a lookup table) for your quasi-sigmoid. If power goes from 0 to 1, then create a texture of 1 x 256 (or whatever horizontal size preserves your function best) and simply look up a value for your current power using tex1D. You will need to run this function on the CPU to fill in this texture, but it ...


4

return tex2D(ColorMapSampler, input.TexCoord) * DiffuseIntensity * DiffuseColor * Diff + SpecularColor * specular); That's 1 opening brace and 2 closing braces; one of these should be removed. I'm guessing it's the first one?


4

It's because you really have an unexpected ), at the end of this line return tex2D(ColorMapSampler, input.TexCoord) * DiffuseIntensity * DiffuseColor * Diff + SpecularColor * specular); ^ | ...


3

You might want to do some research on Subsurface Scattering to get an idea of how to go about recreating this kind of effect. Subsurface scattering is important for rendering realistic skin but in that case you are generally dealing with a light in front of or behind a translucent object rather than inside it. The same basic principles apply but some of the ...


3

No. As you mention, rendering to a texture is the way to achieve that functionality. If you take a look at a block diagram of a GPU pipeline, you'll see that the blending stage - which is what combines fragment shader output with the framebuffer - is separate from the fragment shader and is fixed-function. I'm not a GPU designer - so I can only speculate ...


3

In OpenGL version <= 2.x if you enable shaders but don't supply any shader code the shader stage is incomplete and trying to render something will just cause an error. In OpenGL version >= 3 core profile supplying shaders is mandatory. Without a shader it's the same situation as OpenGL-2 shaders enabled, but no shader supplied: Trying to render something ...


3

There's nothing that says you have to reuse the seed for a random generator from run to run, you just need any seed. If you use, say, the pixel coordinate, then you will end up with a deterministic result (i.e. pixel x, y will always have the same random flare to it), but overall the entire face it will be randomly distributed. Now, if you have available ...


3

It's executed once for each primitive (triangle, line or point) after the vertex shader has transformed the constituent vertices.


3

Looking at the HLSL docs, pow(x, y) appears to be implemented directly as exp(y * log(x)). Since x=0 in your question, again looking at the docs log(x) == -INF. It seems like the value of y shouldn't matter at that point as long as it's positive and greater than zero. You might be accidentally comparing pow(0.0, 2.0) == 0.0 with pow(0.0, 0.0) == 1.0. ...


3

After a day's work I did find my problem; I forgot to recompile my updated shaders. So the DX9 version was still loaded instead of the DX10 version of the shader, very stupid, but also very common mistake.


3

This answer is correct at the time of writing, but will possibly change as FireMonkey develops: You cannot use PixelShader or ShaderModel 3.0 or higher, as FireMonkey (under Windows) uses DirectX 9, while PixelShader/ShaderModel 3.0+ are features of DirectX 10. If you look in Winapi.D3DX9.pas (lines 2871-2872), you'll be able to confirm that ps_3_0 is not a ...



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