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10

Your code (or some code called by you) is making a call to a COM method which is returning an unknown value. If you can find that then you're half way there. You could try breaking when the exception is thrown. Go to Debug > Exceptions... and use the Find... option to locate System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException. Tick the option to break when it's ...


8

If you use a touch device the Manipulation events will work directly. If you want to use a mouse device to simulate touch, you can use Blake.NUI's MouseTouchDevice to do just that. Simply add that file or library reference to your project and call MouseTouchDevice.RegisterEvents(this); on the constructor of your Window. You can also pass another element ...


7

Apple bought the patent portfolio of a company called FingerWorks so that it could build multitouch into its own devices. FingerWorks made a keyboard replacement called the TouchStream that was the single best input device I have ever owned. As a keyboard, it allowed me to touch type at full speed with zero force required for a key "press" to register. ...


7

When using TagVisualizer, the trick is that you have to put your whole app inside of it. For example: <s:TagVisualizer> <s:TagVisualizer.Definitions> <s:ByteTagVisualizationDefinition Value="00" /> </s:TagVisualizer.Definitions> <s:ScatterView> <s:ScatterViewItem /> <s:ScatterViewItem /> ...


6

Assuming that you have a named your SurfaceButton to "SurfaceButton1" and you have access to an instance of the command, you can use the following code: SurfaceButton1.Command = SaveReservationCommand;


6

Microsoft has demonstrated a way to do this in their Mobile Connect sample application. They've ingeniously used the fact that almost all phones have a camera that faces down when the phone is placed on a flat surface. So they created an app that will read incoming color data from Surface while the phone is sitting on it. So it goes like this: The ...


6

In our application we have the need to display a lot of content that is provided as PDF from our customers. Instead of directly displaying the PDF we create image files (one for each page) and created a control to change pages, scroll, resize and whatever needed to display the data. There are drawbacks: no PDF forms or buttons, I won't list more. But this ...


6

Let's start by hopping in the wayback machine to the time when Surface 1.0 was being built... The year is 2006. There is no concept of multitouch in the Windows operating system (or even in mainstream mobile phones!). There are no APIs that allow an application to respond to a users simultaneously interacting with multiple controls. The input routing, ...


5

I came across System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException while opening a project solution. Sometimes user doesn't have enough priveleges to run some COM Methods. I ran Visual Studio as Administrator and the exception was gone.


5

Here is a great interview you should listen to. Basically, you will likely need to purchase a PixelSense machine. The Developer edition is $15,000. At the moment, it is difficult to get your hands on the bits unless you went to PDC but I'd imagine that will change and there will more opportunities in the future. There is a simulator, but it was only ...


4

1) Microsoft Surface is not a prototype. It is released in a first version. 2) Inside the Microsoft Surface is a regular Winodws Vista computer with usb, wifi and ethernet connections. So basically anything you can do with a normal computer with these interfaces you can do on Microsoft Surface. Since Surface contains a Visual Recognition System with cameras ...


4

I am not familiar with Surface but if you don't have any debugging tools i would start by wrapping everything in a try block, so the exception message and callstack can be retrieved: try { //Method code here } catch (Exception ex) { //Output the exeption messages here, use a recursive method to get those of inner exceptions as well. //Example ...


4

I don't really understand your question. But here are some answers to what you may be asking: Why aren't there more surface applications out there? Most likely because of the price and the availability. It costs $15,000 for a developer unit and you have to be a business to even get to order it. Why isn't the surface SDK used to build normal desktop apps ...


4

This is probably not the answer you want, but I would recommend you re-think your use case a bit to make the file choosing a bit more user friendly. For example, it is highly unlikely that your users need to choose an arbitrary file from the surface device's file system. You probably have a defined folder where they can load documents (or whatever) from. ...


4

You can achieve this by modifying the ControlTemplate for the ScatterViewItem. If you want to remove all the visual features of the scatterview then I guess you could get away with an empty template: <Style TargetType="{x:Type s:ScatterViewItem}"> <Setter Property="Template"> <Setter.Value> <ControlTemplate ...


4

To answer your second question: WPF and XNA are completely different. They do share the following: Built upon .net Use DirectX Can access hardware acceleration of the video card XNA does not have any GUI support built in and is really aimed at games (for PC and XBOX-360) whilst WPF is usable in business style applications. As you've discovered XNA ...


4

You could use an attached property. Create an attached property and in the setproperty method bind to the droped event : public static void SetDropCommand(ListView source, ICommand command) { source.Drop += (sender, args) => { var data = args.Data.GetData("FileDrop"); ...


4

Expanding a bit on Mark's answer... Yes, you can use the manipulation and inertia API's to accomplish this, see this overview page. A while back I created my own very basic scatterview control that essentially did what scatterview does, but with the following limitations: Only one child, so it works more like a Border No default visual appearance or ...


4

Make sure you are using WPF 4 OR using the WPF Toolkit (http://wpf.codeplex.com/) VSM is not built into WPF before 4.


4

It should be obvious why this does not work, you cannot just cast the name of an object to the object it intrinsically references. There is no way for the program to know what the string means. How about just passing the object: Tag="{Binding ElementName=scatterViewCoordinates}" var view = (ScatterView)((SurfaceRadioButton)sender).Tag;


4

Yes it's possible - you can disable touch/contact visualizations for any control or surfacewindow by calling ContactVisualizer.SetShowsVisualizations(ctrl, false); or by adding the following attributes to the XAML: xmlns:s="http://schemas.microsoft.com/surface/2008" s:ContactVisualizer.ShowsVisualizations="False" If you'd like to disable it for the ...


4

Here's how it's done on the Surface team: The Simulator APIs included in the Surface SDK will let you automate sending fake touch input to your app. Combine that with WPF's "Automation Peers" in order to automate validation that your UI is doing the right thing. For Surface controls that are derived from standard WPF controls, you can use the ...


3

You could try this: http://weblogs.asp.net/israelio/archive/2004/07/20/188664.aspx. But even if you solve it, this is a really really lousy user experience. Hyperlinks in the PDF won't work, buttons from Adobe won't be clickable, the scrollbars wont actually work, etc. In other words, you're going to end up with a really lousy Surface app. I strongly ...


3

According to the development whitepaper, yes -- sort of. If you're running in Windows Mode, you're just running straight up Windows 7 and should be able to run your Silverlight application. However, you won't have access to any of the Surface APIs. If you're running in Surface Mode, all of the Surface APIs are for WPF according to the block diagram in the ...


3

Microsoft Surface is a product http://www.microsoft.com/surface/en/us/whatissurface.aspx Windows Touch is the ability of the Windows operatings system to listen to touch events http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/features/touch WPF has the ability to handle touch events http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms754010.aspx So if you have ...


3

You will have to use Transformation for this. Try this answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/8815374/293712 Or You can also try, (I have not tried this) Look at this article for more details textBlock2.RenderTransform = new RotateTransform(IntegerAngleValue);


3

If you want to rotate your image automatically and without user interaction, check Clemens' answer. However if you want to rotate with touch manipulations, I find it easy to put the image in a ScatterViewItem like so: <s:ScatterView> <s:ScatterViewItem CanMove="False" CanScale="False"> <s:ScatterViewItem.Background> ...


3

See here: SurfaceInkCanvas.DefaultDrawingAttributes Property You probably forgot to set the UsesTouchShape to false


3

I found an easy solution by which it seems to work. It does expect you to have Visual Studio 2010 installed. Following the following steps I managed to compile in Visual Studio 2012 using .NET 4.5. TouchDown events work. I tried it out on some small projects and they seem to work perfectly fine. Use Visual Studio 2010 to set up a Surface project. Safe and ...



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