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4

Placement of Tables : require(plotrix) plot(x = Table_positions$x_position ,y= Table_positions$y_position ,xlim=c(0,10),ylim=c(0,10),pch=".") draw.circle(Table_positions$x_position, radius=0.5, Table_positions$y_position) Guests Positioning : for(i in 1:length(guests)){ Table<-as.vector(unlist(guests[i])) posTable<-c(...


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I would use numpy.loadtxt for reading input, but only because post-processing would also need numpy. You can read all your data to memory, then find the separator lines, then reshape the rest of your data to fit your number of particles. The following assumes that none of the particles ever reach exactly x=-9999, which should be a reasonable (although not ...


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No you cannot combine the two like that as grid only accepts one input argument. Rather than using grid you could specify the axes properties directly if you really want it to be a single command. set(gca, 'GridLineStyle', '-', 'XMinorGrid', 'on', 'YMinorGrid', 'on', ... 'ZMinorGrid', 'on', 'MinorGridLineStyle', ':') Honestly though, it's more ...


1

You can add the year values using the text function and the arrows using the arrows function. In each case effort provides the y-values for vertical placement.1 Add xpd=TRUE so that text/arrows outside the plot area won't be clipped. Note that I also changed the left margin to provide more room for the text and arrows. par(mar=c(1,4,1,4)) image.scale(effort,...


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Simply set the aspect keyword, either manually: plt.imshow(resampled.T, extent=(min(x), max(x), max(y), min(y)),interpolation='bicubic', aspect=0.1) or by using the auto option: plt.imshow(resampled.T, extent=(min(x), max(x), max(y), min(y)),interpolation='bicubic', aspect='auto') Another option is to use pcolormesh()


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ggplot2 might be a good choice if you are new to R: the basic syntax is applicable to many different types of plots. Here's your e.g. of a simple forest plot with geom_pointrange. The only trick is that ggplot line plots normally place labels on the x axis and quantitative data on the y axis, which can reverse the ordering of your labels; this can be ...



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