Hot answers tagged

21

If you get this message in RStudio, clicking the 'broomstick' figure "Clear All Plots" in Plots tab and trying plot() again may work.


18

Use %matplotlib notebook instead of %matplotlib inline to get embedded interactive figures in the IPython notebook – this requires recent versions of matplotlib (1.4+) and IPython (3.0+).


16

Edit I've now put this together into a package on github. I've tested it using output from coxph, lm and glm. Example: devtools::install_github("NikNakk/forestmodel") library("forestmodel") example(forest_model) Original code posted on SO (superseded by github package): I've worked on this specifically for coxph models, though the same technique could ...


15

plt.subplots() is a function that returns a tuple containing a figure and axes object(s). Thus when using fig, ax = plt.subplots() you unpack this tuple into the variables fig and ax. Having fig is useful if you want to change figure-level attributes or save the figure as an image file later (e.g. with fig.savefig('yourfilename.png'). You certainly don't ...


15

Another way is to use the subplots function and pass the width ratio with gridspec_kw: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # generate some data x = np.arange(0, 10, 0.2) y = np.sin(x) # plot it f, (a0, a1) = plt.subplots(1,2, gridspec_kw = {'width_ratios':[3, 1]}) a0.plot(x,y) a1.plot(y,x) f.tight_layout() f.savefig('grid_figure.pdf')


13

Just want to add a comment but my rep is too low. The method that @bdemarest posted does not work on igraph version > 0.7. The newer version does not support the area parameter, so I cannot get the same effect. And getting the old version to build took me a while, so I though I'd share some insights. You can manually install igraph 0.7 from source if you ...


13

See the ggplot 2.0 doc on theme: axis.text tick labels along axes (element_text; inherits from text) This should be in an element_text element. Its doc points to function margin. Something along those lines should work: + theme(axis.text.x = element_text(margin=margin(5,5,10,5,"pt")), axis.text.y = element_text(margin=margin(5,5,10,5,"pt"...


13

Since seaborn also uses matplotlib to do its plotting you can easily combine the two. If you only what to adopt the styling of seaborn the set_style function should get you started: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np import seaborn as sns sns.set_style("darkgrid") plt.plot(np.cumsum(np.random.randn(1000,1))) plt.show() Result:


13

I spent a long time looking for solutions, and found this answer. It looks like, in order to get what you (and I) want, you need the combination of plt.ion(), plt.show() (not with blocking=False, that's deprecated) and, most importantly, plt.pause(.001) (or whatever time you want). I think this is because it tries to mimic optimizations in MATLAB that cause ...


12

You can tweak the aesthetics a bit: library(ggthemes) # for theme_map gg <- ggplot() # lay down a base map (no borders or fills) # geom_map is a great way to do map layers like you would in any GIS gg <- gg + geom_map(data=nz, map=nz, aes(x=long, y=lat, map_id=region), color="#00000000", fill="#0000000", size=...


12

You can cheat a bit and use geom_point with a square shape: #devtools::install_github("sjmgarnier/viridis") library(viridis) library(ggplot2) library(ggthemes) library(scales) library(grid) gg <- ggplot(dato) gg <- gg + geom_point(aes(x=long, y=lat, color=value), shape=15, size=5) gg <- gg + coord_equal() gg <- gg + scale_color_viridis(na.value=...


12

This is in case someone is having the same problem on Ubuntu 14.04, as I did using Python 3.4.3. By using bits and hints from JDong's answer, I've solved the problem as follows. (Basically change the MatPlotLib backend to qt5agg.) Install python3-pyqt5. sudo apt-get install python3-pyqt5 Find out where the matplotlibrc file is so you can edit it. This ...


12

A one-line version of this excellent answer to plot the line of best fit is: plt.plot(x, numpy.poly1d(numpy.polyfit(x, y, 1))(x))


11

Here is an alternative solution that I found on the matplotlib mailing list: import matplotlib.pylab as plt x = range(1000) ax = plt.axes() ax.semilogx(x, x) ax.xaxis.set_ticks_position('none')


11

One possibility is to use rect. First use par("usr") to get "the extremes of the user coordinates of the plotting region". Because you want that the "frame should have the same width as the frame around the plot", the x-positions are straightforward: use the first and second values of the 'user coordinates' as xleft and xright. The bottom and top ...


11

pandas dataframe plot will return the ax for you, And then you can start to manipulate the axes whatever you want. import pandas as pd import numpy as np df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(100,5)) # you get ax from here ax = df.plot() type(ax) # matplotlib.axes._subplots.AxesSubplot # manipulate vals = ax.get_yticks() ax.set_yticklabels(['{:3.2f}%'....


11

As you can see: "The Gtk3Agg backend is known to not work on Python 3.x with pycairo." And so the suggestion presented is: Try installing cairocffi. The installation guide for cairocffi is pretty straight-forward. If the dependencies1 are met it is as simple as: pip install cairocffi 1) The dependencies for Python 3.x should logically be: sudo ...


11

Here are the steps to get the layout you describe: 1) Extract the legend as a separate grob ("graphical object"). We can then lay out the legend separately from the plots. 2) Left-align the edges of the four plots so that the left edges and the x-scales line up properly. The code to do that comes from this SO answer. That answer has a function to align an ...


11

One way I have found is to produce a colormap and then project it onto a polar axis. Here is a working example - it includes a nasty hack, though (clearly commented). I'm sure there's a way to either adjust limits or (harder) write your own Transform to get around it, but I haven't quite managed that yet. I thought the bounds on the call to Normalize ...


10

We can plug your formula straight into stat_summary() to generate the desired result without intermediate steps: library(ggplot2) ggplot(mpg) + stat_summary(aes(x=class, y = cyl), fun.y = function(x) length(x) / length(unique(x)), geom = "bar")


10

Jianxun's solution did the job for me but broke the y value indicator at the bottom left of the window. I ended up using FuncFormatterinstead (and also stripped the uneccessary trailing zeroes as suggested here): import pandas as pd import numpy as np from matplotlib.ticker import FuncFormatter df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(100,5)) ax = df.plot() ax....


10

As far as I see, the problem is (as you already wrote), that MeanResidualLife takes a long time to compute, even for a single evaluation. Now, the FindMinimum or similar functions try to find a minimum to the function. Finding a minimum requires either to set the first derivative of the function zero and solve for a solution. Since your function is quite ...


9

MATLAB has a built-in annotation function that can be used to generate arrows and place them on your plot. However, MATLAB unhelpfully has written this function in such a way that the xy inputs are normalized to the figure window containing the axes and not mapped to the data points in your axes. This means we need to convert them, an annoying task but not a ...


9

Although this is caused by a bug in plotly (see comment from takje), you can work around this bug by treating your plot not as a single line with multiple widths, but as many line segments, each with a fixed width. First, set up the data: library(ggplot2) library(plotly) set.seed(123) df1 <- as.data.frame(list('x'=1:100,'y'=1:100,'lw'=abs(rnorm(100)))) ...


9

You need to replace the actual close window request with something "inert". The following code should do what you want: figure('CloseRequestFcn', @(h,e) fprintf(1, 'Not allowed, use "close %d force"\n.', h)); Please note that this will not make it impossible: it will prevent accidental window closing, but if your colleagues make practical jokes like ...


9

Putting a title in a RGL plot is now possible, thanks to an update dating from last year. The idea is to use the new function bgplot3d which outputs to the background of the RGL window, as if it was a normal plot. For example: # A minimal plot3d example library(rgl) a = matrix(runif(3000), ncol=3) plot3d(a, col = rainbow(100)[cut(a[,1], breaks = seq(0,1,...


9

You can use ggplot2 in combination with geom_ribbon: library(ggplot2) ggplot(dat, aes(x = Age, y = CO2)) + geom_line() + geom_ribbon(aes(ymin = CO2 - Standard_error, ymax = CO2 + Standard_error), alpha = 0.2)


9

You can define a custom scale for the x-axis, which you can use instead of 'log'. Unfortunately, it's complicated and you'll need to figure out a function that lets you transform the numbers you give for the x-axis into something more linear. See http://matplotlib.org/examples/api/custom_scale_example.html. Edit to add: The problem was so interesting I ...


9

We can use expression() : set.seed(1) d1 <- data.frame(y = rnorm(100), x = rnorm(100)) plot(y ~ x, data = d1,ylab = expression(y %->% x),xlab = expression(x %->% y)) List of expressions can be found at : https://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-devel/library/grDevices/html/plotmath.html


8

Following @thelatemail's suggestion, I decided to make my edit into an answer. My solution is based on @thelatemail's answer. I wrote a small function to draw curves, which makes use of the logistic function: #Create the function curveMaker <- function(x1, y1, x2, y2, ...){ curve( plogis( x, scale = 0.08, loc = (x1 + x2) /2 ) * (y2-y1) + y1, ...



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