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86

I'm using both. I think they complement each other. As you said, PMD works on source code and therefore finds problems like: violation of naming conventions, lack of curly braces, misplaced null check, long parameter list, unnecessary constructor, missing break in switch, etc. PMD also tells you about the Cyclomatic complexity of your code which I find very ...


39

You should definitely use FindBugs. In my experience, the false-positive rate is very low, and even the least-critical warnings it reports are worth addressing to some extent. As for Checkstyle vs. PMD, I would not use Checkstyle since it is pretty much only concerned with style. In my experience, Checkstyle will report on a ton of things that are ...


35

To get Eclipse to not flag the @SuppressWarnings("PMD") annotation, look under the menu headings Java -> Compiler -> Errors/Warnings -> Annotations -> Unhandled Token in '@SuppressWarnings' and set it to ignore. Right on the PMD page. Sorry for not searching properly.


35

Because a switch statement is compiled with two special JVM instructions that are lookupswitch and tableswitch. They are useful when working with a lot of cases but they cause an overhead when you have just few branches. An if/else statement instead is compiled into typical je jne ... chains which are faster but require many more comparisons when used in a ...


29

It means you should use logging framework like logback or log4j and instead of printing exceptions directly: e.printStackTrace(); you should log them using this frameworks' API: log.error("Ops!", e); Logging frameworks give you a lot of flexibility, e.g. you can choose whether you want to log to console or file - or maybe skip some messages if you find ...


27

You should add the maven-jxr-plugin to the reportingPlugin section. <reporting> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-jxr-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.3</version> </plugin> </plugins> ...


27

A number of PMD rules are more style opinions than correctness alerts. If you don't agree with this rule or the rule doesn't match your project's coding standards, you could consider suppressing warnings or even configuring PMD to enforce only the rules you like


26

DD and DU anomalies (if I remember correctly—I use FindBugs and the messages are a little different) refer to assigning a value to a local variable that is never read, usually because it is reassigned another value before ever being read. A typical case would be initializing some variable with null when it is declared. Don't declare the variable until ...


25

^(?!my)\w+$ should work. It first ensures that it's not possible to match my at the start of the string, and then matches alphanumeric characters until the end of the string. Whitespace anywhere in the string will cause the regex to fail. Depending on your input you might want to either strip whitespace in the front and back of the string before passing ...


25

Sonar uses these 3 tools as plugins and aggregates the data from all three giving addition value by showing graphs and such from these tools. So they are complementary to sonar.


25

Sonar will run CheckStyle, FindBugs and PMD, as well as a few other "plugins" such as Cobertura (code coverage) by default for Java projects. The main added value, however, is that it stores the history in a database. You can then see the trend. Are you improving the code base or are you doing the opposite? Only a tool with memory can tell you that. You ...


22

Avoid negation: Instead of if( x!=y ) doThis() else doThat(), check for the positive case first, because people/humans tend to like positive things more than negative. It twists the brain to have to reverse the logic in mind when reading the source code. So instead, write: if ( x!=y ) doThis() else doThat() // Bad - negation first if ( x==y ) ...


17

It is inefficient, as it involves an unneeded string concatenation, thus the creation of one or two extra String objects - although I believe the JIT can optimize it away. To me the bigger problem is that the code is less clear. Calling toString is a standard idiom, understandable to every Java developer (hopefully :-), so you should prefer this.


15

"TaxName".equals(localName) is better as if localName is null you won't get a null pointer exception.


15

Making the example even simpler, this class has a nPath value of 2. It should be pretty apparent why it is two - there are clearly two execution paths through the code. package test; import java.util.*; public class Test { private static final long UNKNWOWN = -1; public void method(Date a) { long aTime; if (a == null) { ...


15

Arguably it will take more space in memory and storage - so a jar file containing classes with enormous method names will be larger than one with short class names, for example. However, any difference in performance is incredibly unlikely to be noticeable. I think it's almost certain that the projects where they were blaming long method names for poor ...


14

The standard ruleset file is *.xml inside pmd-bin-x.x.x.zip/.../lib/pmd-x.x.x.jar/rulesets/, refer to http://pmd.sourceforge.net/rules/index.html. The default ruleset file of PMD Eclipse Plugin is inside pmd___.jar in your {IDE}/plugins/..., but you should not make any changes in that file. Add/edit the rules in Eclipse Preferences, any changes will take ...


14

For your specific use case it makes no sense as you keep the reference to the new Object after the loop. So there is no real alternative to your solution. More generally speaking, creating short lived objects in Java is cheap* (apart from the hidden cost that the GC will run more often). In particular, the allocation is almost free and the time of GC mostly ...


13

The best feature of PMD, is its XPath Rules, bundled with a Rule Designer to let you easily construct new rules from code samples (similar to RegEx and XPath GUI builders). FindBugs is stronger out of the box, but constructing project specific rules and patterns is very important. For example, I encountered a performance problem involving 2 nested for ...


13

I know is an old post but I just had the same need (almost) and I solve it using a LineIterator from FileUtils in Apache Commons. From their javadoc: LineIterator it = FileUtils.lineIterator(file, "UTF-8"); try { while (it.hasNext()) { String line = it.nextLine(); // do something with line } } finally { it.close(); } Check the ...


12

In each case, the rule can be a matter of specific circumstances or just "taste". Instantiating an Object in a loop should be avoided if there are a large number of iterations and the instantiation is expensive. If you can move the code out of the loop, you will avoid many object instantiations, and therefore improve performance. Having said that, this ...


12

If you call printStackTrace() on an exception the trace is written to System.err and it's hard to route it elsewhere (or filter it). Instead of doing this you are adviced to use a logging framework (or a wrapper around multiple logging frameworks, like Apache Commons Logging) and log the exception using that framework (e.g. logger.error("some exception ...


11

The problem is that the caller may keep a copy of the array argument that it passed, and can then change its contents. If the object is security critical and the call is made from untrusted code, you've got a security hole. In this context, passing a collection and saving it without copying it would also be a potential security risk. (I don't know if ...


11

Each Sonar profile publishes it's Checkstyle, FIndbugs and PMD configuration under the permalinks tab. Assuming you've got Sonar installed locally, the following link shows the configuration files used by the "Sonar Way" profile: http://localhost:9000/profiles/permalinks/2


10

I generally prefer the former. I don't generally like side-effects within a comparison, but this particular example is an idiom which is so common and so handy that I don't object to it. (In C# there's a nicer option: a method to return an IEnumerable<string> which you can iterate over with foreach; that isn't as nice in Java because there's no ...


9

1.1 How do i set the PMD checks [...] PMD stores rule configuration in a special repository referred to as the Ruleset XML file. This configuration file carries information about currently installed rules and their attributes. These files are located in the rulesets directory of the PMD distribution. When using PMD with Eclipse, check Customizing PMD. ...


9

/^(?!my).*/ (?!expression) is a negative lookahead; it matches a position where expression doesn't match starting at that position.


9

If you are using System.out|err.println(..) to print out user-information on console in your application's main()-method, you do nothing wrong. You can get rid of the message via inserting a comment "//NOPMD". System.out.println("Fair use of System.out.println(..).");// NOPMD There is a "Mark as reviewed"-Option in the PMD-Violations Outline for this ...



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