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50

As rdbound said, Boost has a "near STL" status. So if you don't need another library, stick to Boost. However, I use POCO because it has some advantages for my situation. The good things about POCO IMO: Better thread library, especially a Active Method implementation. I also like the fact that you can set the thread priority. More comprehensive network ...


14

I have used parts of POCO now and again and found it to be a very nice lib. I largely abandoned ACE a number of years ago but POCO contains some of the same patterns - Task, Reactor, etc. I have never had any problems with it so I have to assume it is stable. Some aspects that I like: it is a pretty well integrated OOP hierarchy so the components work ...


11

Many POCO users report using it alongside Boost, so it is obvious that there are incentives for people in both projects. Boost is a collection of high-quality libraries. But it is not a framework. As for ACE, I have used it in the past and did not like the design. Additionally, its support for ancient non-compliant compilers has shaped the code base in an ...


10

Although there is some overlap, Boost.Asio is not the equivalent of POCO's Net library. Higher-level protocols are outside of the scope for Boost.Asio. The rationale of the library explicitly states that it is a tookit, rather than a framework, that has been designed to support the development of other libraries that provide higher levels of abstraction, ...


9

I would make this a comment, but apparently I don't have the rep. Have you remembered to make the destructor for Command virtual? If name or data are fields of PutCommand rather than Command and the Command destructor is not virtual, they may not be freed properly when you delete command in handleClientPacket.


9

Assuming you use you use autotools to build Poco, run ./configure with the --static flag. $ ./configure --static See ./configure --help for a full list of flags.


9

The canonical way of passing arguments to a new thread is via the Runnable subclass you'll need to create as thread entry point. Example: class MyThread: public Poco::Runnable { public: MyThread(const std::string& arg1, int arg2): _arg1(arg1), _arg2(arg2) { } void run() { // use _arg1 and _arg2; //... ...


8

You are setting content type like this: req.setContentType("Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded\r\n"); which should be: req.setContentType("application/x-www-form-urlencoded\r\n");


8

It all depends on what the actual purpose of your library is (and on what abstraction level over/alongside POCO it operates), and why/if you are using POCO as an implementation detail. (Herein I ignore the question if you should or should not handle the exception at your level, lets assume it is a case where you should throw an exception from the perspective ...


6

I have used ACE for a very high performance data acquisition application with real time constraints. A single thread handles I/O from over thirty TCP/IC socket connections and a serial port. The code runs on both 32 and 64 bit Linux. A few of the many ACE classes I have used are the ACE_Reactor, ACE_Time_Value, ACE_Svc_Handler, ACE_Message_Queue, ...


6

With this enviroment: MinGW (GCC 4.7.0) + MSYS Poco 1.4.6 (downloaded at 5 febrery 2013) This is how I configure and compile Poco for MinGW and Windows 7: Extract Poco into a folder of your choice. C:/ for this example. Apply the next path to avoid copysign error.(From https://github.com/pocoproject/poco/issues/57). In the file ...


6

// objects std::string json = "{ \"test\" : { \"property\" : \"value\" } }"; Parser parser; DefaultHandler handler; parser.setHandler(&handler); parser.parse(json); Var result = handler.result(); Object::Ptr object = result.extract<Object::Ptr>(); Var test = object->get("test"); object = test.extract<Object::Ptr>(); test = ...


6

Reactive Applications certainly scale better, when they are written correctly. This means Never blocking in a reactive thread: Any blocking will seriously degrade the performance of you server, you typically use a small number of reactive threads, so blocking can also quickly cause deadlock. No mutexs since these can block, so no shared mutable state. ...


5

The answer is bound to be subjective but with particular emphasis on for a beginner then I think POCO is clearly the way to go. It actually has some HTTPClient classes and once you get beyond the point of being happy that something works the code is clear enough to follow so that you can dig in and understand why it works if that is where things lead you. ...


5

I have never used ACE, but I used Boost and Poco. I really like the coding style of Poco. The packages are consistent and the source code is easy to read. They're not template crazy like boost. In my experience I spend hours reading how to use boost - serialization package, pointer map container etc- and little time reading how to use Poco stuff. I ...


5

The ACE socket libraries are solid. If you are trying to port a standard implementation of sockets you can't go wrong. The ACE code sticks to a rigid development paradigm. The higher level contructs are a little confusing to use. The rigid paradigm causes some anomolies with exception handling. There are or used to be situations where string value pairs ...


5

Let's take Net/samples/httpget as an example, let's copy httpget/ as a new httpsget directory: open Makefile, add "PocoNetSSL" to target_libs replace 'HTTPClientSession' with 'HTTPSClientSession' you need to create Poco::Net::Context for SSL use replace 'HTTPClientSession session(uri.getHost(), uri.getPort());' with following two lines: const ...


5

Option 2 will most efficiently occupy your hardware. Here is the classic article, ten years old but still good. http://www.kegel.com/c10k.html The best library combination these days for structuring an application with concurrency and asynchronous waiting is Boost Thread plus Boost ASIO. You could also try a C++11 std thread library, and std mutex (but ...


5

What I ended up using is a different approach as TCPServer is a different beast altogether. Following the example posted here I ended up with a class inheriting from ServerApplication, and a class which becomes essentially the connection handler by a SocketReactor. Deamonizer header: class Daemon : public ServerApplication { public: Daemon(); /// ...


5

This is actually a bug in the implementation of the stopAll() method. The listening socket is being shut down after closing the currently active connections, which allows the server to accept new connections in between, which in turn will not be closed and keep running. A workaround is to call HTTPServer::stop() and then HTTPServer::stopAll(). I reported the ...


4

I recently got a new job and work on a project that uses ACE and TAO. Well, what I can tell is, that ACE and TAO work and fully accomplish their tasks. But the overall organisation and design of the libraries are quite daunting... For example, the main part of ACE consists of hundreds of classes starting with "ACE_". It seems like they've ignored namespaces ...


4

Boost enjoys a "near STL" status due to the number of people on the C++ standards committee who are also Boost developers. Poco and ACE do not enjoy that benefit, and from my anecdotal experience Boost is more widespread. However, POCO as a whole is more centered around network-type stuff. I stick to Boost so I can't help you there, but the plus for Boost ...


4

Quoting the online documentation for HTTPClientSession: sendRequest() will return an output stream that can be used to send the request body. After you are done sending the request body, create a HTTPResponse object and pass it to receiveResponse(). The following snippet shows one way to use the output stream to read in a file: try { ...


4

You are attempting to use SMTP over TLS (the port 465 passed to the SocketAddress). In one shot you have to learn (1) TLS and certificate handling in POCO, before focusing on (2) your goal: sending an email message. I suggest to start learning POCO with simpler examples. You can find sample code in the various samples directories in the POCO source code. I ...


4

Try with this: #include <iostream> #include "Poco/Net/TCPServer.h" #include "Poco/Net/TCPServerParams.h" #include "Poco/Net/TCPServerConnectionFactory.h" #include "Poco/Net/TCPServerConnection.h" #include "Poco/Net/Socket.h" using namespace std; class newConnection: public Poco::Net::TCPServerConnection { public: newConnection(const ...


3

Sounds like your shell environment doesn't have all the needed paths. Have you tried using the VS Command Prompt? If not,just click the link in the Start Menu VS entry that opens cmd.exe with some additional environmental setup.


3

Boost is great, I've only heard good things about POCO (but never used) but I don't like ACE and would avoid it in future. Although you will find fans of ACE you will also find many detractors which you don't tend to get with boost or poco (IME), to me that sends a clear signal that ACE is not the best tool (although it does what it says on the tin).


3

It is possible to use POCO with MinGW - some folks already do this successfully. I would first try to get going with MinGW alone, and when this works, integrate it into Eclipse (which shouldn't be too hard.). There are some patches and bug reports in POCO's tracker on SourceForge. Looking at them will certainly help ...


3

Out of those I've only ever really used ACE. ACE is a great framework for cross-platform enterprise networking applications. It's extremely versatile and scalable and comes with TAO and JAWS for quick, powerful development of ORB and/or Web based applications. Getting up to speed with it can be somewhat daunting, but there is a lot of literature on it, and ...



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