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59

As rdbound said, Boost has a "near STL" status. So if you don't need another library, stick to Boost. However, I use POCO because it has some advantages for my situation. The good things about POCO IMO: Better thread library, especially a Active Method implementation. I also like the fact that you can set the thread priority. More comprehensive network ...


20

Are you referring to POCO C++ Libraries and Tools? If so, Download POCO C++ libraries here Extract(eg: extract to C:\poco-1.4.6) Find appropriate solution file and build. build_vs71.cmd ==> Visual Studio .NET 2003 build_vs80.cmd ==> Visual Studio 2005 build_vs90.cmd ==> Visual Studio 2008 build_vs100.cmd ==> Visual Studio 2010 build_vs110.cmd ==> ...


18

EDIT: as of 1.5.2, things were simplified by making DefaultHandler, well ... default (and renaming it to its proper name - ParseHandler. So, if all you need is parsing, no need to explicitly provide the handler anymore: // objects std::string json = "{ \"test\" : { \"property\" : \"value\" } }"; Parser parser; Var result = parser.parse(json); Object::Ptr ...


15

I have used parts of POCO now and again and found it to be a very nice lib. I largely abandoned ACE a number of years ago but POCO contains some of the same patterns - Task, Reactor, etc. I have never had any problems with it so I have to assume it is stable. Some aspects that I like: it is a pretty well integrated OOP hierarchy so the components work ...


14

Many POCO users report using it alongside Boost, so it is obvious that there are incentives for people in both projects. Boost is a collection of high-quality libraries. But it is not a framework. As for ACE, I have used it in the past and did not like the design. Additionally, its support for ancient non-compliant compilers has shaped the code base in an ...


13

Assuming you use you use autotools to build Poco, run ./configure with the --static flag. $ ./configure --static See ./configure --help for a full list of flags.


12

The canonical way of passing arguments to a new thread is via the Runnable subclass you'll need to create as thread entry point. Example: class MyThread: public Poco::Runnable { public: MyThread(const std::string& arg1, int arg2): _arg1(arg1), _arg2(arg2) { } void run() { // use _arg1 and _arg2; //... ...


12

Although there is some overlap, Boost.Asio is not the equivalent of POCO's Net library. Higher-level protocols are outside of the scope for Boost.Asio. The rationale of the library explicitly states that it is a tookit, rather than a framework, that has been designed to support the development of other libraries that provide higher levels of abstraction, ...


12

#include <iostream> #include <string> #include <Poco/JSON/JSON.h> #include <Poco/JSON/Parser.h> #include <Poco/Dynamic/Var.h> using namespace std; using namespace Poco::JSON; string GetValue(Object::Ptr aoJsonObject, const char *aszKey) { Poco::Dynamic::Var loVariable; string lsReturn; string lsKey(aszKey); // ...


10

Besides the .h and .o files, you will probably also have one or more libXXX.a and/or libXXX.so files. These are the actual library files that your application should link against. To use the library, you include the relevant headers in your source file, and you change your makefile to tell the linker that it should also link your application to the XXX ...


9

You are setting content type like this: req.setContentType("Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded\r\n"); which should be: req.setContentType("application/x-www-form-urlencoded\r\n");


9

I don't think Poco comes with any pre-packaged ".pc" files but you should be able to create your own easily and stick them in the lib/pkgconfig directory on your system if you prefer that method. I don't know exactly where you installed Poco on your system so you may have to do a "find" to locate your files. To compile you need to specify the poco header ...


9

I would make this a comment, but apparently I don't have the rep. Have you remembered to make the destructor for Command virtual? If name or data are fields of PutCommand rather than Command and the Command destructor is not virtual, they may not be freed properly when you delete command in handleClientPacket.


9

Reactive Applications certainly scale better, when they are written correctly. This means Never blocking in a reactive thread: Any blocking will seriously degrade the performance of you server, you typically use a small number of reactive threads, so blocking can also quickly cause deadlock. No mutexs since these can block, so no shared mutable state. ...


8

They are equivalent. Locals don't go out of scope until after the last line of their block has been executed. So in this case, the return value copy is made under the protection of the lock.


8

Let's take Net/samples/httpget as an example, let's copy httpget/ as a new httpsget directory: open Makefile, add "PocoNetSSL" to target_libs replace 'HTTPClientSession' with 'HTTPSClientSession' you need to create Poco::Net::Context for SSL use replace 'HTTPClientSession session(uri.getHost(), uri.getPort());' with following two lines: const ...


8

This question is very old, but I had the same doubt, so looking on the library Forum I found: http://pocoproject.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=1233&p=2681&hilit=logger#p2681 The important quotation is: "The Logger is thread safe regarding the different logging function. If you try to change the Channel connected to a Logger while another thread ...


8

It all depends on what the actual purpose of your library is (and on what abstraction level over/alongside POCO it operates), and why/if you are using POCO as an implementation detail. (Herein I ignore the question if you should or should not handle the exception at your level, lets assume it is a case where you should throw an exception from the perspective ...


8

Normally POCO has a great advantage to be very simple even when you know nothing about it and you do not need middle/advance C++ knowledge like you need for boost/asio ( e.g what means enable_share_from_this ... ) Under the poco "installation directory" you find the sample directory, in our case ( poco\poco-1.4.6p4\Net\samples\httpget\src ). On-line help ...


7

I recently got a new job and work on a project that uses ACE and TAO. Well, what I can tell is, that ACE and TAO work and fully accomplish their tasks. But the overall organisation and design of the libraries are quite daunting... For example, the main part of ACE consists of hundreds of classes starting with "ACE_". It seems like they've ignored namespaces ...


7

Runtime type information cannot be used to instantiate templates. An instance of type_info whose value will only be known when you run the program, doesn't magically turn into a type like int, std::string or struct FooBar when the compiler is compiling this code. I don't know Poco library, but perhaps you could use their other Any type, DynamicAny (see ...


7

With this enviroment: MinGW (GCC 4.7.0) + MSYS Poco 1.4.6 (downloaded at 5 febrery 2013) This is how I configure and compile Poco for MinGW and Windows 7: Extract Poco into a folder of your choice. C:/ for this example. Apply the next path to avoid copysign error.(From https://github.com/pocoproject/poco/issues/57). In the file ...


7

What I ended up using is a different approach as TCPServer is a different beast altogether. Following the example posted here I ended up with a class inheriting from ServerApplication, and a class which becomes essentially the connection handler by a SocketReactor. Deamonizer header: class Daemon : public ServerApplication { public: Daemon(); /// ...


7

If all you want is multi-threaded TCP server, then "out of the box" Poco::Net::TCPServer will do - it is multi-threaded internally. Start with defining the connection, this one will just echo back whatever you send to it: class EchoConnection: public TCPServerConnection { public: EchoConnection(const StreamSocket& s): TCPServerConnection(s) { } ...


6

Your question seems to imply that you already have a makefile for your own code. If that's the case, then yes, you should modify the rule for your executable in that makefile. As Bart van Ingen Schenau points out, the POCO makefile probably assembled the objects files into libraries such as Poco/Libraries/libPoco.a, so you should use them instead of trying ...


6

I have used ACE for a very high performance data acquisition application with real time constraints. A single thread handles I/O from over thirty TCP/IC socket connections and a serial port. The code runs on both 32 and 64 bit Linux. A few of the many ACE classes I have used are the ACE_Reactor, ACE_Time_Value, ACE_Svc_Handler, ACE_Message_Queue, ...


6

If instead of using a Poco::Thread you use a Poco::Task, you get a thread that can be cancelled. The following sample code (ready to run as-is) should give you an idea: #include <Poco/Task.h> #include <Poco/TaskManager.h> #include <Poco/Thread.h> #include <string> #include <iostream> using namespace std; class UdpListenerTask ...


6

Try with this: #include <iostream> #include "Poco/Net/TCPServer.h" #include "Poco/Net/TCPServerParams.h" #include "Poco/Net/TCPServerConnectionFactory.h" #include "Poco/Net/TCPServerConnection.h" #include "Poco/Net/Socket.h" using namespace std; class newConnection: public Poco::Net::TCPServerConnection { public: newConnection(const ...


6

This is actually a bug in the implementation of the stopAll() method. The listening socket is being shut down after closing the currently active connections, which allows the server to accept new connections in between, which in turn will not be closed and keep running. A workaround is to call HTTPServer::stop() and then HTTPServer::stopAll(). I reported the ...



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