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3

Let's examine it line by line: char *str = "Ninechars"; printf("Start\n"); printf("%s\n", str); printf("%p\n", str); // address of first char of str printf("%p\n", str+1); // address of second char of str The above addresses are part of the stack. printf("%s\n", str[1]); Actually, str[1] == *(str + 1). What %s expects though is a char *, thus ...


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The code referred to as the second variable is in fact this (taken from OP's code): auto ptr_res2(new Object("new")); This does not create a std::shared_ptr, it creates a pointer to Object. When creating a std::shared_ptr using its constructor that takes a naked pointer, you must pass a pointer to already allocated memory (e.g. allocated using new). This ...


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In that question, the "second variable" referred to this line: auto ptr_res2(new Object("new")); // this creates an Object* Not this one: std::shared_ptr<Object> p2(new Object("foo")); // this creates a shared_ptr<Object> The best explanation for why make_shared is more efficient with one allocation is to compare images. Here is what ...


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In my test case as long as the data is one byte the value printed is correct but for more than one byte the value displayed is the last value that was read from the port plus some garbage values. From the read(2) manpage: On success, the number of bytes read is returned (zero indicates end of file), and the file position is advanced by this ...


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You delete code should be: void deletePoly(poly* node) { poly* next; while (node != NULL) { next = node->next; free(node); node = next; } }


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Why do I have to convert the object to a function pointer before calling operator() You don't have to and you can't either. It wouldn't work. A pointer-to-object cannot be converted to a pointer-to-function. Even if that was permitted, it would be pretty much meaningless: by converting the object to a function pointer and calling it, you would make the ...


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First of all this statement *(pcpci+1) = &cpci; has undefined behaviour because you may not dereference a pointer that does not points to an object. You could use this construction if pcpci would point to an element of an array and pcpci + 1 also point to the next element of the same array. So it would be more coorectly to write *(pcpci) = ...


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But i was wondering why is this happening since pcpci is not a constant pointer No, but *(pcpci+1) is. It has type const int* const. Obviously you can't assign anything to that.


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Why is the second one not a shared pointer ? Will that not increment a reference count I believe the quote refers to the original poster's code, which claims to create a smart pointer but in fact does not do that. ptr_res2 is just a regular pointer. cout << "Create smart_ptr using new..." << endl; auto ptr_res2(new Object("new")); cout ...


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The "syntactic sugar" you mention applies to the postfix-expression [...]. What you have in your examples are declaration's. Both use the same characters, but the two constructs belong to completely different branches of the syntax tree.


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t := *q makes a copy of the struct pointed to by q. If you want to observe changes to q through t, then stick with a pointer: func main() { t := q q.X = 4 u := *q fmt.Println(p, q, r, s, t, u, *t == u) } This produces the output you were probably looking for. {1 2} &{4 2} {1 0} {0 0} &{4 2} {4 2} true I'm not sure what seems ...


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If I have understood correctly then you need something like this item **ArrayPointer = new item *[s]; for ( int i = 0; i < s; i++ ) { ArrayPointer[i] = new item; { i, "More Data" }; } Or item **ArrayPointer = new item *[s]; for ( int i = 0; i < s; i++ ) { ArrayPointer[i] = new item; ArrayPointer[i]->data = i; ...


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The scenario points out to a simple root cause: you are not making a copy of the object before editing it. The two objects in your NSMutableArray are actually the same object. It is hard to identify the problem without seeing the relevant code. However, you need to make sure that the products and quantities are not stored in the same object: @interface ...


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The issue you are running into involves the as-if rule which allows the optimizer to transform your code in any way as long as it does not effect the observable behavior of the program. So if you only write to the variable but never actually use in your program the optimizer believes there no observable behavior and assumes it can validly optimize away the ...


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The general inspiration behind C's (admittedly confusing) declaration syntax is that "declaration follows use". So, for example: int *ptr; happens to declare ptr as an object of type int* (which is why some people prefer to write int* ptr;), but if you follow the syntax what it really means is that *ptr is of type int. But don't take the idea that ...


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Quoting from C-faq: Saying that arrays and pointers are ''equivalent'' means neither that they are identical nor even interchangeable. What it means is that array and pointer arithmetic is defined such that a pointer can be conveniently used to access an array or to simulate an array. In other words, as Wayne Throop has put it, it's ''pointer ...


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The problem is that you process p_newStr without initializint it, and only performing pointer arithmetic on it. I guess, that you wanted to see it as a string, adding chars to it. So first initialisze it: char* p_newStr = newStr; // It was unitinitalised, pointing at random location Then note that p_newStr = p_newStr + str[i] means adding the ...


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The second one is still a shared pointer. It is calling the constructor for shared_ptr: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/memory/shared_ptr/shared_ptr/ However, using make_shared is more efficient because it is only doing one allocation rather than 2 allocations. Remember, a shared_ptr needs space on the heap for Object and also the manager to keep ...


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The expression *line++ = '\0'; is straight-forward. As some people have noted, the ++ operator has a higher precedence than the * operator, so the expression could be parenthesized as *(line++) = '\0';. The line++ operator evaluates to the current value of line and then increments the value in line. The *line++ therefore evaluates to the character that ...


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The *line++ = '\0' is equal to: *line = '\0'; line++; It is used to null-terminate a string, as it should be in C. The *argv++ = line is meant to parse the next argument from the arguments supplied in the char **argv (pointer to the char array).


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This is a question of opinion, however, here is mine: I think the version that returns the pointer is better. Why? Simply because it makes the calling site less magic. With the return variant, you call the function like this: int** my2dArray = doSomething(); It is perfectly clear, that my2dArray is initialized to point to some array that the function ...


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Since you mentioned that you are a Java programmer, you should look into how C memory assignment (in this case especially strings) work: char *vysledek = ""; In Java, this would create a string object, where you can simply add characters at your will. In C, however, this will basically create an array of char[1], containing '\0' (string termination ...



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