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5

You can indeed treat every object as an array of characters. However, you have to cast the pointer explicitly: float f = 1.5f; char const * p = (char const *)&f; for (size_t i = 0; i != sizeof(float); ++i) { printf("The byte at position %zu has value %d.\n", i, (int)p[i]); }


5

OP tagged C++ so here goes.. std::stringstream ss; ss << f1; std::string s = ss.str(); ptr = s.c_str();


3

I don't see anything in your original problem statement that requires the pointer to be initialized to the address of an int. The minimal code required to fix the example would be to add a constructor that takes an int, and initialize MyValue to nullptr. class MyInt { public: MyInt(int) {} private: int* MyValue = nullptr; }; int main(int ...


3

int f(char* p) is the usual way in C to pass the pointer p to the function f when p already points to the memory location that you need (usually because there is a character array already allocated there as in your Method 2 or Method 3). int f(char** p) is the usual way in C to pass the pointer p to the function f when you want f to be able to modify the ...


3

It is a pointer to a pointer. In C you cannot change variables passed by value, as parameters are handled as local variables. You have to pass their pointers instead, and then modify the value of *variable. It also applies when the variable you want to change is already a pointer. In this case you have to pass the pointer to that pointer, so when you ...


2

You're running this program on a little endian computer. This means your int array is stored in memory as bytes in the following order: 0x03 0x02 0x00 0x00 (first integer) 0x04 0x00 0x00 0x00 (second integer) Try to print out *(p+i) for p between 0 and 7, it should verify this.


2

Take a look at this code: key = *a[p]; Here, key is a char* and a is a char**. This means that a[p] is a char*, so *a[p] is a char. This causes a warning - you're trying to convert a char to a char*, which definitely is worrysome. To fix this, try removing the star here. You have similar mistakes throughout your code where you're putting extraneous stars ...


2

In C you cannot de-reference a void pointer. So you can type cast the void pointer and use it. something like this dptr=((double*)data+8); So the data which is void is considered as a double pointer now.


2

For p, calling Greeting() is simply calling p.Greeting(), for u it's calling (&u).Greeting(). Example: func (u *User) Greeting() string { return fmt.Sprintf("Greetings %s [%p]!", u.Name, u) } func main() { p := &User{"cppgohan by pointer"} u := User{"cppgohan by value"} pu := &u fmt.Printf("[%p] %v %v\n", pu, ...


2

Without that cast you'll get a compiler warning. &a is a const int * not a int *.


2

You should declare explicit types for the arguments of substring(): char substring(char* source, int start, int count, char* result)


1

reachID is an int value. You store numbers there. pRight is a pointer to a WaterRight. It stores the address of some WaterRight. pRight->m_reachComid is also an int value. Specifically it is the m_reachComid field of the WaterRight instance pointed to by pRight. So: WaterRight *pRight = new WaterRight; // pRight is a *pointer to a WaterRight ...


1

You are connecting an uninitialized pointer (dialog) in the MainWindow constructor : connect(dialog,SIGNAL(sendData(QString)), this,SLOT(reciveData(QString))); Move the connection part into the on_pushButton_dialog_clicked() slot : void MainWindow::on_pushButton_dialog_clicked() { dialog = new Dialog(this); ...


1

What about the shared pointer? Should I assign it or use the make_shared function? tl;dr The assignment is most likely what you are looking for. This depends entirely on the semantics of the class involved; If you want the objects to share the state of the shared_ptr then an assignment or a copy would be required If you want each object to maintain ...


1

Use snprintf function to convert a float value to a string. Use sprintf function to convert a float value to a string. Also use a field width to ensure you are not overflowing the destination array.


1

Syntactically it is correct. It depends on the compiler , some compilers throw an error while some don't. Your code throws an error when compiled using visual studio but it just gives you warning when compiled using gcc compiler and you also get a junk character as output with gcc. Even though syntactically it is correct you shouldn't assign a pointer in ...


1

Edit Your post is very unclear. Assuming data is actually a pointer to an array of double the solution is even simpler: double * pd = static_cast<double const *>(data); double d0 = pd[0]; double d1 = pd[1]; or (C): double * pd= (double const *)(data); double d0 = pd[0]; double d1 = pd[1]; You cannot perform pointer arithmetics and dereferencing ...


1

It depends on your purpose, do you intend to create a 2-dimensional array, or a array of pointers, or just a pointer to pointer? 1) A 2-dimensional array void allocate_two_dimen_array(char ***words, unsigned int x, unsigned int y){ *word = malloc(x * y * sizeof(char)); } 2) A array of char pointers void allocate_pointer_array(char ***words, unsigned ...


1

You have the answer of your first question in your title: item **head means head is a pointer to a pointer. Why your second code snippet doesn't work? because head = newitem; assigns the value to the local variable head, which is not what the code is intended to do.


1

You're seeing an effect of how pointer math is conducted on differing sizes of integers, as well as the endian-ness of your machine. On a little-endian architecture (like whatever you're using - probably an Intel-esque processor) values are stored in memory with the least-significant byte first. So when you declare a 64-byte integer value 0x0202, it gets ...


1

*(p+1) is a pointer to the second byte of the first int. Integers are stored on most of the machines in little endian format. So 0x0203 is stored as 03 02 00 00, thats why you get 02 in return.


1

You seem to be asking about JNI methods. Assuming that's the case, the JVM 'pins' a JNI argument object or an object created by a JNI method to the same address for the duration of the method. If you want to save a JNI object reference between JNI calls and have it be valid during the next call you have to use a GlobalRef. EDIT I've answered your question ...


1

It's implementation-defined in which order the bits of an integer are stored in memory. (That means that the compiler gets to decide, and almost certainly it bases it on decisions made by the CPU for how the CPU stores an integer in memory). The two most common layouts are (lowest address first) 01 02 03 04 0a 0b 0c 0d (typical example: ARM) 0d 0c 0b 0a ...


1

Another way: MyInt(int x) : MyValue(new int(x)) {} This doesn't require the additional member. However, you have to make sure that you deallocate the memory in the destructor. ~MyInt() { delete MyValue; }



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