Hot answers tagged

1520

static_cast is the first cast you should attempt to use. It does things like implicit conversions between types (such as int to float, or pointer to void*), and it can also call explicit conversion functions (or implicit ones). In many cases, explicitly stating static_cast isn't necessary, but it's important to note that the T(something) syntax is equivalent ...


1289

The C standard defines the [] operator as follows: a[b] == *(a + b) Therefore a[5] will evaluate to: *(a + 5) and 5[a] will evaluate to: *(5 + a) a is a pointer to the first element of the array. a[5] is the value that's 5 elements further from a, which is the same as *(a + 5), and from elementary school math we know those are equal. (Addition is ...


1058

static_cast static_cast is used for cases where you basically want to reverse an implicit conversion, with a few restrictions and additions. static_cast performs no runtime checks. This should be used if you know that you refer to an object of a specific type, and thus a check would be unnecessary. Example: void func(void *data) { // Conversion from ...


951

A smart pointer is a class that wraps a 'raw' (or 'bare') C++ pointer, to manage the lifetime of the object being pointed to. There is no single smart pointer type, but all of them try to abstract a raw pointer in a practical way. Smart pointers should be preferred over raw pointers. If you feel you need to use pointers (first consider if you really do), ...


902

It's very unfortunate that you see dynamic allocation so often. That just shows how many bad C++ programmers there are. In a sense, you have two questions bundled up into one. The first is when should we use dynamic allocation (using new)? The second is when should we use pointers? The important take-home message is that you should always use the ...


877

Read it backwards (as driven by Clockwise/Spiral Rule)... int* - pointer to int int const * - pointer to const int int * const - const pointer to int int const * const - const pointer to const int Now the first const can be on either side of the type so: const int * == int const * const int * const == int const * const If you want to go really crazy ...


760

A pointer can be re-assigned: int x = 5; int y = 6; int *p; p = &x; p = &y; *p = 10; assert(x == 5); assert(y == 10); A reference cannot, and must be assigned at initialization: int x = 5; int y = 6; int &r = x; A pointer has its own memory address and size on the stack (4 bytes on x86), whereas a reference shares the same memory address ...


658

Pointers is a concept that for many can be confusing at first, in particular when it comes to copying pointer values around and still referencing the same memory block. I've found that the best analogy is to consider the pointer as a piece of paper with a house address on it, and the memory block it references as the actual house. All sorts of operations ...


408

What is happening When you write T t; you're creating an object of type T with automatic storage duration. It will get cleaned up automatically when it goes out of scope. When you write new T() you're creating an object of type T with dynamic storage duration. It won't get cleaned up automatically. You need to pass a pointer to it to delete in order to ...


377

Declaration A prototype for a function which takes a function parameter looks like the following: void func ( void (*f)(int) ); This states that the parameter f will be a pointer to a function which has a void return type and which takes a single int parameter. The following function (print) is an example of a function which could be passed to func as a ...


360

The C standard specifies the lower limit: 5.2.4.1 Translation limits 276 The implementation shall be able to translate and execute at least one program that contains at least one instance of every one of the following limits: [...] 279 — 12 pointer, array, and function declarators (in any combinations) modifying an arithmetic, ...


343

The delete operator deletes only a reference, never an object itself. If it did delete the object itself, other remaining references would be dangling, like a C++ delete. (And accessing one of them would cause a crash. To make them all turn null would mean having extra work when deleting or extra memory for each object.) Since Javascript is garbage ...


289

Reviewing the basic terminology It's usually good enough - unless you're programming assembly - to envisage a pointer containing a numeric memory address, with 1 refering to the second byte in the process's memory, 2 the third, 3 the fourth and so on.... What happened to 0 and the first byte? Well, we'll get to that later - see null pointers below. For a ...


275

int* arr[8]; // An array of int pointers. int (*arr)[8]; // A pointer to an array of integers The third one is same as the first. The general rule is operator precedence. It can get even much more complex as function pointers come into the picture.


258

How is it a keyword and an instance of a type? This isn't surprising. Both true and false are keywords and as literals they have a type ( bool ). nullptr is a pointer literal of type std::nullptr_t, and it's a prvalue (you cannot take the address of it using &). 4.10 about pointer conversion says that a prvalue of type std::nullptr_t is a null ...


252

x is a pointer to an array of 5 pointers to int. x[0] is an array of 5 pointers to int. x[0][0] is a pointer to an int. x[0][0][0] is an int. x[0] Pointer to array +------+ x[0][0][0] x -----------------> | | Pointer to int +-------+ 0x500 | 0x100| ...


246

typedef is a language construct that associates a name to a type. You use it the same way you would use the initial type, for instance typedef int myinteger; typedef char *mystring; typedef void (*myfunc)(); using them like myinteger i; // is equivalent to int i; mystring s; // is the same as char *s; myfunc f; // compile ...


243

I'll interpret your question as two questions: 1) why -> even exists, and 2) why . does not automatically dereference the pointer. Answers to both questions have historical roots. Why does -> even exist? In one of the very first versions of C language (which I will refer as CRM for "C Reference Manual"), operator -> had very exclusive meaning, not ...


239

You have pointers and values: int* p; // variable p is pointer to integer type int i; // integer value You turn a pointer into a value with *: int i2 = *p; // integer i2 is assigned with integer value that pointer p is pointing to You turn a value into a pointer with &: int* p2 = &i; // pointer p2 will point to the address of integer i Edit: ...


227

Because array access is defined in terms of pointers. a[i] is defined to mean *(a + i), which is commutative.


212

My rule of thumb is: Use pointers if you want to do pointer arithmetic with them (e.g. incrementing the pointer address to step through an array) or if you ever have to pass a NULL-pointer. Use references otherwise.


209

Arrays on the type level An array type is denoted as T[n] where T is the element type and n is a positive size, the number of elements in the array. The array type is a product type of the element type and the size. If one or both of those ingredients differ, you get a distinct type: #include <type_traits> static_assert(!std::is_same<int[8], ...


208

The difference is due to operator precedence. The post-increment operator ++ has higher precedence than the dereference operator *. So *ptr++ is equivalent to *(ptr++). In other words, the post increment modifies the pointer, not what it points to. The assignment operator += has lower precedence than the dereference operator *, so *ptr+=1 is equivalent to ...


207

It's not just better, it's the only possible way. If you stored a Node object inside itself, what would sizeof(Node) be? It would be sizeof(int) + sizeof(Node), which would be equal to sizeof(int) + (sizeof(int) + sizeof(Node)), which would be equal to sizeof(int) + (sizeof(int) + (sizeof(int) + sizeof(Node))), etc. to infinity. An object like that can't ...


202

Use the cdecl program, as suggested by K&R. $ cdecl Type `help' or `?' for help cdecl> explain int* arr1[8]; declare arr1 as array 8 of pointer to int cdecl> explain int (*arr2)[8] declare arr2 as pointer to array 8 of int cdecl> explain int *(arr3[8]) declare arr3 as array 8 of pointer to int cdecl> It works the other way too. cdecl> ...


198

There are three ways to pass a 2D array to a function: The parameter is a 2D array int array[10][10]; void passFunc(int a[][10]) { // ... } passFunc(array); The parameter is an array containing pointers int *array[10]; for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) array[i] = new int[10]; void passFunc(int *a[10]) //Array containing pointers { // ... } ...


194

Rules of thumb for C++11: Pass by value, except when you do not need ownership of the object and a simple alias will do, in which case you pass by const reference, unless you must mutate the object, in which case, use pass by a non-const lvalue reference, unless you pass objects of derived classes as base classes, in which case you need to pass by ...


185

Because you're passing the value of the pointer to the method and then dereferencing it to get the integer that is pointed to.


183

Both person and person2 are references, to the same object. But these are different references. So when you are running person2 = null; you are changing only reference person2, leaving reference person and the corresponding object unchanged. I guess the best way to explain this is with a simplified illustration. Here is how the situation looked like ...


180

Method 1 (using new) Allocates memory for the object on the free store (This is frequently the same thing as the heap) Requires you to explicitly delete your object later. (If you don't delete it, you could create a memory leak) Memory stays allocated until you delete it. (i.e. you could return an object that you created using new) The example in the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible