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The example you provided does not exhibit any immediate undefined behavior. According to the standard since the number of elements you are reserving is greater than the current capacity of the vector a reallocation will occur. Since the allocation occurs at the point where reserve is called the pointer returned by data() is itself valid. 23.3.6.3/2 ...


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It's a compiler bug The compiler does not appear to actually apply the __block attribute to a variable until a block is created which references the variable. Change your code to the semantically equivalent: __block int i = 0; TestBlock myBlock = ^{ NSLog(@"block value %d", i); NSLog(@"block address %p", &i); i = 2; }; testBlock(&i, ...


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It will invoke the current classes GetEnumerator method. Since your class inherits from List<Member>, it will use that list's enumerator for the foreach loop. The this keyword reference to the current instance of the class, useful when you have methods that need to refer to itself. You can read more about this on the this (C# Reference) page


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Take this for your reference:- bool isSame(int *p, int *q, int n) { if( n == -1 ) return true; if ( *p != *q ) return false; else isSame(++p, ++q, --n); } int main() { int arr1[] = {1,2,3,2,4,5}; int arr2[] = {2,1,5,2,3,4}; //check if two arrays have different number of elements... //If yes then just ...


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The only function that calls itself is haveSameElems: bool haveSameElems(int Arr1[], int Arr2[], int size) { ///pick an element from arr1, if it appears in arr2 cut both out using shiftback ///if it doesn't appear rerturn false, false should go thorugh all levels till the end //end: if true check last two elements, if false return false if ...



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