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Adding to Gisheri's answer Following code worked for me var drawingManager = new google.maps.drawing.DrawingManager({ drawingMode: google.maps.drawing.OverlayType.MARKER, drawingControl: true, drawingControlOptions: { position: google.maps.ControlPosition.TOP_CENTER, drawingModes: [ google.maps.drawing.OverlayType.POLYGON ...


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One way to do this is to use all the points of interest on the map and generate a Voronoi diagram. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voronoi_diagram There are some different algorithms to chose from, such as Fortune's algorithm. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fortune%27s_algorithm There are also other posts regarding this on SO. Easiest algorithm of Voronoi ...


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Here's code to generate a regular polygon with the first vertex at zero-angle-right-of-center: The code uses trigonometry to rotate the polygon instead of context.rotate. function regularPolygon(cx,cy,sides,radius,radianRotation){ var deltaAngle=Math.PI*2/sides; var x=function(rAngle){return(cx+radius*Math.cos(rAngle-radianRotation));} var ...


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Use the Douglas-Peucker algorithm for polyline simplification. It has best case O(N Log N) behavior, and (unfortunately) O(N²) in the worst case. There is a more complex variant called DPHull, with a guaranteed O(N Log N) worst case. See "Speeding Up the Douglas-Peucker Line-Simplication Algorithm" by Hershberger & Snoeyink.


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The thinning algorithm we discussed in comments works on a curved polyline, which is usually a chain of pixel coordinates, but doesn't have to be. It eliminates points that are "unnecessary" to render the curve within some given tolerance. Let P_0 and P_n-1 be the polyline end points and Eps be the tolerance. We will produce a subsequence of these points ...


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There is a considerable literature on the topic, which goes under the key phrase polygonal chain approximation. Here is an early work, whose subsequent 111 citations may be of more use than the original: Melkman, A. and O'Rourke, J., "On polygonal chain approximation," in Computational Morphology, Ed. G.T. Toussaint, Elsevier, North-Holland, 1988: ...


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Different approach using transform rotate Triangular shape is pretty easy to make using this technique. For people who prefer to see an animation explaining how this technique works, you can follow this link : How to make a CSS triangle with transform rotate explained with an animation DEMO : A few triangles made with transform rotate Otherwise, here is ...


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If you're just using Simpson's rule to calculate area, the following function will do the job. Just make sure the polygon is closed. If not, just repeat the first coordinate pair at the end. This function uses a single array of values, assuming they are in pairs (even indexes are x, odd are y). It can be converted to using an array of arrays containing ...


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Some geometry with Paint: 0. You have a corner: 1. You know the coordinates of corner points, let it be P1, P2 and P: 2. Now you can get vectors from points and angle between vectors: angle = atan(P.Y - P1.Y, P.X - P1.X) - atan(P.Y - P2.Y, P.X - P2.X) 3. Get the length of segment between angular point and the points of intersection with the ...


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Here is a way using some geometry :- the two lines are tangent to circle inscribed The normal to the tangent meet at centre of the circle. Let angle between lines be X Angle subtended at centre of the circle will be K = 360-90*2-X = 180-X Lets decide the two point of tangents as (x1,y) and (x2,y) The chord joining the points has length l = ...


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One issue is the initialization of the latitude_y and longitude_x variables: latitude_y appears to contain the 'x' coordinate. longitude_x appears to contain the 'y' coordinate.


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You are looking for an arc tangent to two connected line segments, of a given radius, given by some sequential array of points. The algorithm to find this arc is as follows: For each segment, construct a normal vector. If you are working in 2d, you can just subtract the two endpoints to get a tangent vector (X, Y). In that case, normal vectors will be ...


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This is because your points are likely sorted in your list as the follow (attempted) picture shows _________________________ | pt1 pt2 ... ptm | | | | | | ptm+1 ptm+2 ... pt2m | |________________________| Because of this the polyfill function is trying to fill from ptm to ptm+1 making your triangles ...


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There is another way by using the „scale“-parameter of linear_extrude(). It „scales the 2D shape by this value over the height of the extrusion. Scale can be a scalar or a vector“ (Documentation). Using a vector with x- and y-scalefactor, you get the modification, you wanted: d = 2; // height of ellipsoid, diameter of bottom circle t = 0.25; // ...


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This is really more of a comment, but I cannot comment since it requires 50 reputation... Otoh, I don't think there is satisfactory answer to this question, since it is not welldefined. But +1 for an interesting question :-) The algorithm giving the red dashed line starts from the straight line between start and end point of your path (which isn't entirely ...


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It seems to be to do with the order. If you are using $geoWithin and you are trying to find points inside a polygon, the thing that is within is the field you are searching on. However, geoIntersects works in either direction, so you can search for points inside polygons, or polygons containing points, eg, db.geom.insert({"polygons": ...


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I assume preprocessing is allowed. First decompose the polygon in monotone chains: consider all sides in turn and chain all those going in the same direction (up or down). You can ignore the horizontal sides. There will be at best two chains (always two for convex polygons), and at worst N-1 or N of them (depending on the parity on N) if you are really ...


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Here is a solution which uses O(n log n) time for preprocessing and O((log n)^2 + cnt) per query, where cnt is a number of intersections. It works for any polygon. 1)Preprocessing: Store each segment as a pair(low_y, high_y). Sort them by low_y. Now it is possible to build a two dimensional segment tree where the first dimension is low_y and the second ...


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I don't know if this answers your question, but here's a piece of code I wrote serveral years ago. It calculates the point index out of a list of polygon points and the distance of the perpendicular to the nearest edge. It uses a Vector2 struct that defines the vector operators +, -, * (dot product) and methods GetLength and GetSquaredLength. The same code ...


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While you can surely write your own code, I suggest to have a look at libraries like AutoTrace or potrace. They should already do most of the work. Just run them via the command line and read the resulting vector output. If you want to do it yourself, try to find the rough outline and then apply an algorithm to smooth the outline. Related: Simplified (or ...


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You could try to adapt the Hough transform to this application.


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Hi The Problem is resolve now. <style> #img {clip-path: url(#clipping); -webkit-clip-path: url(#clipping); -webkit-shape-outside: url(#clipping); shape-outside: url(#clipping); } </style> <svg width="0" height="0"> <defs> <clipPath id="clipping"> <!-- <circle cx="284" cy="213" r="213" ...


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you can't change cirle into polygon, for polygon, use path tag and its d attribute. Here's a link that can help.


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Looking at the current version code, that feature is not implemented on polymaps. You may want to fork polymaps so you can have <text> items near each graphic item.


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If you want two different colors, you need two different polygons. You can either call polygon multiple times, or you can add NA values in your x and y vectors to indicate a new polygon. R will not automatically calculate the intersection for you. You must do that yourself. Here's how you could draw that with different colors. x <- c(1,2,2.5,NA,2.5,3,4) ...


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For calculating area and even volume you can use convhull.


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Your code is "stress-testing" the polygon code. Strictly speaking, your list of points does not define a polygon. In theory, a planar region (a polygon shape in particular) is well defined only by a so-called Jordan (simple) curve that forms the perimeter. In the simplest terms, a Jordan (simple) curve must not cross itself. When the same shape is redefined ...


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I was wrestling with the problem of listening for clicks on the Google Map canvas today, and I may have discovered an ugly hack/workaround using jQuery: setTimeout( function() { var gmDomHackSelect = $('.gm-style').children().eq(0); gmDomHackSelect.click(handleMapCanvasClick); }, 3000); This fragment of code was from my map initialisation function, so ...


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You can use the shoelace formula, eg def PolygonArea(corners): n = len(corners) # of corners area = 0.0 for i in range(n): j = (i + 1) % n area += corners[i][0] * corners[j][1] area -= corners[j][0] * corners[i][1] area = abs(area) / 2.0 return area # examples corners = [(2.0, 1.0), (4.0, 5.0), (7.0, 8.0)] This ...


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This is indeed due to inconsistent bounding boxes as conjectured in the comment by @jlhoward. Your points are in [273663.9, 275091.45] x [7718635, 7719267] while the polygon is contained in [-41.17483, -41.15588] x [-20.619647, -20.610134]. Assuming the coordinates were indeed consistent with the window the correct way way of getting it into a ppp object ...


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With a small number of vertices it might be worth checking the distances between each vertex and the others. In your square example dist(p1,p2), dist(p1,p3), dist(p1,p4), dist(p2,p3), dist(p2,p4) and dist(p3,p4). These values will exist for each polygon. There will be a point that has the same distance set as p1, and as p2, and so on. Once you have a ...


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Just to add a (simple) Java implementation of the original code in C from code suggested by @Dean Povey (I don't know why @Dean Povey is referring to a large implementation): static boolean pnpoly(double[] vertx, double[] verty, double testx, double testy) { int nvert = vertx.length; int i, j; boolean c = false; for (i = 0, j = nvert-1; i ...



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