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3

It is because you are providing it a positional argument here: button = Button(self.parent, text="Check Device", command= self.adb("devices")) command want's a callback function. and you are passing it the response from the adb method. (see here fore more: http://effbot.org/tkinterbook/button.htm) when that line is being called, self.adb("devices") is ...


3

The alias command is built into the shell. popen, like system(), invokes /bin/sh to execute the specified command. Your interactive shell is probably bash, which supports a -p option to alias. /bin/sh, depending on your system configuration, probably does not. In any case, even if this worked it wouldn't give you any useful information. The popen() call ...


3

I assume Windows for such a question? You may specify the window to be minimized or maximized, using the startupinfo parameter of popen. si = subprocess.STARTUPINFO() si.dwFlags = subprocess.STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW si.wShowWindow = 3 # SW_MAXIMIZE See the ShowWindow documentation for the list of values. AFAIK there is no named constant for them in the ...


2

You need to pass a list of files to cat So subprocess.Popen(['cat'], stdin=inFile, stdout=subprocess.PIPE) should become subprocess.Popen(['cat'] + [fileList], stdout=subprocess.PIPE) And consequently inFile should no longer be needed So, all in all import subprocess import glob filePath = outDir + '/aDir/*' outFilePath = outDir + '/outFile.txt' ...


2

As it is you're passing the command to gnome-terminal, not python. p = subprocess.Popen(["gnome-terminal","-e","python /path/to/file.py"],shell = False)


1

You do not specify whan cmd is, but some programs do not emit the escape sequences necessary for color output on a terminal when they determine that their standard output is not actually connected to a terminal. Depending on the program you may or may not be able to override that. With ansible, you can set the force_color configuration variable to 1 to ...


1

You're almost there! You can do the following: import subprocess p = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdin=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True) p.communicate(input='\r') You may need to use \n instead of \r if there are any problems. \r is a carriage return, and \n is a newline.


1

Args is supposed to be either a string or a sequence of strings as per the documentation. But if you do want to pass an object, you could perhaps serialize the object into JSON, then deserialize it back in your second script to retrieve the original object. You may then proceed with the second script's operations


1

The problem is in the way you declare args: it should be *args (one asterisk) instead of **args (two asterisks). One asterisk specifies any number of positional arguments, where as two asterisks means any number of named arguments. Also, you need to pass args correct to adb.exe: def adb(self, *args): process = subprocess.Popen(['adb.exe'] + args, ...


1

You can ask for the fourth integer up front, then send it in along with the other 3: p = subprocess.Popen(['ABC'], stdin=subprocess.PIPE) fourth_int = raw_input('Enter the 4th integer: ') all_ints = '1 2 3 ' + fourth_int p.communicate(input=all_ints)


1

The redirection occurs before ABC is executed e.g., (on Unix) after the fork() but before execv() (look at dup2() calls). It is too late to use the same OS level mechanism for the redirection after Popen() returns but you could emulate it manually. To "redirect p.stdin to terminal's stdin" while the process is running, call shutil.copyfileobj(sys.stdin, p....


1

alias is no executable program but a shell built-in (think of it as a "function in bash scripting language") so you can't open a process by this name. You could try to fool bash and pipe it in. Something like this untested snippet: FILE* p = popen("/bin/bash", "r"); // Note: on non-Linux-systems you might need another path or rely on $PATH fprintf(p, "alias ...


1

So, user enter command which he want to run If the user already may run any command including bash then the bandit 's warning about shell=True is not applicable. The warning would make sense if the user were allowed only to choose some parameters for a fixed command e.g., a search query for a grep command: rc = call(['grep', '-e', query, path]) ...


1

I was able to solve my problem by using Popen.communicate() So some kind of pseudo code: proc = subprocess.Popen(…) proc.communicate(input="my_input_via_stdin")


1

You can't change the command-line arguments after the program has started i.e., sys.argv can be changed only from the inside (normally) of the process itself. Popen.communicate(input=data) can send data to the child process via its standard input (if you pass stdin=PIPE to Popen()). .communicate() waits for the process to exit before returning and ...



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