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3

Do you mean N blocks of 3 unsigned char' s [0...255]? Note the difference: unsigned char *pixel[3] -> array of pointers to char Vs unsigned char (*pixel)[3] -> pointer to array of chars #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #define N 4 int main(void) { unsigned char (*pixel)[3]; pixel = malloc(sizeof(*pixel) * N); ...


1

You can simulate this using a 1D array. Say you want to allocate a wxh rectangle of pixels. You could write. char *pixels = (char *) malloc(w*h*3*sizeof(char)); Now the 3 color bytes appear contiguous in memory and you can access any cell using some arithmetic You can get/set the color channels at cell (i,j) by defining the macros: #define r(p, i, j) ...


-2

If you don't want structs, you can't avoid writing char***. But you can use a type, to make it more stylish. So the best solution matching your requirements seems to be: #include <stdlib.h> typedef char*** pixelmap_t; int main() { int channels = 3, width = 10, height = 10; pixelmap_t test = malloc(width*height*channels); int x = 1, y = 2, ...


0

Frankly I would stick with PyInstaller or something similar. That will always provide you with the correct version of Python whether or not the target machine has Python installed. It also protects you from clobbering a previously installed version of Python. If you need to add plugins, then you should build that into your app. There are a few projects that ...


0

Use a library like this: http://ftputil.sschwarzer.net Everything else is "Reinventing the wheel".


0

I was going to suggest /OPT:REF but then saw that you already tried that. If all else fails you could try one of the "executable packer" options, such as ASPack (aspack.com) or UPX (upx.sourceforge.net). They will compress you executable and won't introduce additional dependencies.


1

I did some looking and found this. https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/universal-programming-language looks interesting


1

It is possible with MS SQL Server 2014. See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn133079.aspx Here is an example of SQL generation code (from MSDN): -- create a database with a memory-optimized filegroup and a container. CREATE DATABASE imoltp GO ALTER DATABASE imoltp ADD FILEGROUP imoltp_mod CONTAINS MEMORY_OPTIMIZED_DATA ALTER DATABASE imoltp ...


2

In most cases they are pretty similar in concept. Wave format has a standardized header that describes the format of the data, followed by the audio data. One of the fields of the header indicates the audio format. A typical wave file will have an audio format of PCM (1) which means the data is unencoded PCM audio samples. All other values of the audio ...


2

Well, as long as you use the standard C library, all is well. The GNU C Library (glibc) is one implementation of the C standard, and for example Microsoft has their own implementation of it. From a user's (your) perspective, the impelementation doesn't matter. If you for example #include <stdio.h> then you can, on any standards-compliant platform, ...


0

For C library functions, I suggest you ensure that you use functions within the POSIX standard. This will (at least in theory) guarantee compatibility with other POSIX platforms. If you are programming on linux using glibc (i.e. the normal C library), the documentation thereof is reasonably good at pointing out what are GNU extensions, but the POSIX ...


0

I have done this myself because I was in the same position. I tried copying the JDK as well, but that didn't work, could be a mistake on my part. I am using OpneJDK now, and that works perfectly with intelij-idea, I'm sure it works with Eclipse as well. http://openjdk.java.net/


0

You can always serialise Java objects to plain binary files. One file for each type of object to simulate a database table, or you can serialise all objects in the same file, but you need to know the order when you read them back. Other solutions would be to serialise the java objects either as XML structures or JSON (using JAXB is very easy and strait ...


7

Simplest: class MyClass(ParentClass): bar = staticmethod(foo) with the rest of your code staying the same. While staticmethod is most often used as a "decorator", there is no requirement to do so (thus, no requirement for a further level of indirection to have bar be a decorated method calling foo).


3

I would go with Alex Martelli's suggestion. Just for the record, though, (I wrote this answer before seeing Alex Martelli's beautiful answer) you can also do the following in Python 2.7 and 3.x (note especially the documentation links I have provided, so that you understand what is going on): You can use a static method, which will not expect an implicit ...



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