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93

Finally got the solution while changing mask image and using of Xfermode with Bitmap Mask ImageView mImageView= (ImageView)findViewById(R.id.imageview_id); Bitmap original = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(),R.drawable.content_image); Bitmap mask = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(),R.drawable.mask); Bitmap result = ...


40

Here's an excellent article with illustrations by a Google engineer: http://ssp.impulsetrain.com/porterduff.html PorterDuff is described as a way of combining images as if they were "irregular shaped pieces of cardboard" overlayed on each other, as well as a scheme for blending the overlapping parts. The default Android way of composing images is ...


10

Instead of allocating a new canvas on each repaint, you should be able to allocate it once and then reuse the canvas on each repaint. on init and on resize: Bitmap b = Bitmap.createBitmap(getWidth(), getHeight(), Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888); Canvas c = new Canvas(b); on repaint: b.eraseColor(Color.TRANSPARENT); // needed if backColor is not opaque; ...


9

As you already found, i would use clip: draw background image set clip draw foreground image I would use Canvas.clipPath() with path looking like pie slice starting in the center of circle, like this: To create clip path use something like: public class PieView extends View { private int width = 200; private int angleStart = 135; ...


8

You're trying to solve this problem using a view hierarchy like this: ParentListViewInverterView Problem is, in this position, InverterView has no control over how ListView is drawn. But you know who does have control over how ListView is drawn? ListView's parent layout does. In other words, what you really want is a hierarchy like this: ...


6

Sa and Sc are shorts for "source alpha" and "source color", respectively. The srcColor parameter in the PorterDuffColorFilter constructor is the color used for these values. For your case the Mode.MULTIPLY would probably work best.


5

I've tried a completely different approach after having some kind of an epiphany - and realized that the solution for this problem was a much simpler approach - as it usually is. And as I need only two bitmaps, I need much fewer memory to work with it. For drawing: canvas.drawBitmap(mImage, mTransformationMatrix, mPaintImageRegular); if (mFogOfWarState != ...


5

Sure, just draw the path to an offscreen buffer so you can use it as a mask when you draw the bitmap, something like this: // Create an offscreen buffer int layer = c.saveLayer(0, 0, width, height, null, Canvas.HAS_ALPHA_LAYER_SAVE_FLAG | Canvas.FULL_COLOR_LAYER_SAVE_FLAG); // Setup a paint object for the path mPaintPath.setARGB(255, 255, 255, ...


5

I believe this question may help you: Understanding the Use of ColorMatrix and ColorMatrixColorFilter to Modify a Drawable's Hue That said, I would suggest using PorterDuff.Mode.MULTIPLYfor what you're needing.


5

I created a library call WScrarchView where you can implement scratch view just few lines in layout xml. Hope this can help those who still looking for the solution https://github.com/winsontan520/Android-WScratchView


4

There's a much cheaper and easier way to achieve this: use clipping. Canvas.clipRect() is enough. Your solution is burning a lot of fillrate. You can get the effect you want by using SRC_IN instead of DST_IN. Be careful though: it will work only in a transparent Bitmap or in layer. When you draw directly on screen, the destination is already filled by the ...


4

Note that Porter-Duff modes are only defined to work properly with premultiplied alpha. That means that none of the R, G or B components can exceed the alpha value. GitHub project for the Android project which shows off all the Porter-Duff modes. The Android App is also available on Playstore.


4

I'm not sure i got exacly what you need, but if you just want to apply EmbossMaskFilter around some png letter with alpha channel, you can pretty much do this trick with EmbossMaskFilter filter = new EmbossMaskFilter(new float[]{1, 1, 1}, 0.5f, 0.6f, 2f); Paint paintEmboss = new Paint(); paintEmboss.setMaskFilter(embossMaskFilter); Bitmap helperBitmap = ...


4

Canvas does not support eraser while Bitmap does. Basic workaround flow: Create another canvas Create a bitmap Set that bitmap to that canvas public void init(int width, int height) { Log.i(TAG,"init with "+width+"x"+height); foreground = Bitmap.createBitmap(width, height, Config.ARGB_8888); cacheCanvas = new Canvas(); ...


3

QPainter uses the Raster backend by default. It seems that this backend internally operates with premultiplied RGBA data. This causes data loss in RGB channels for low alpha. It seems that there is no simple way to change this behavior. You may try to use OpenGL or OpenVG backends if possible. Backends are described in this section of the docs. Another ...


3

I had to change the masks as described by @Christian. Then, the wanted result could easily be produced: canvas.drawRect(rect, paint); paint.setXfermode(new PorterDuffXfermode(Mode.DST_IN)); canvas.drawBitmap(mask, 0.0f, 0.0f, paint);


3

In addition to the 12 Porter-Duff blending equations, Android supports Lighten, Darken, Multiply, Screen and soon Overlay. Unfortunately this means HardLight is not available and you would have to implement it yourself.


2

I needed to do something like that a while ago, and I found this post about Color Channels a lot enlightening. (But I'm afraid this is related to what you described in your "PS")


2

I was able to do this using the xfermode DST_OUT method


2

I was implementing photo filters similar to what iOS app of ours does. They do it something like source bitmap + mask bitmap + blend mode + alpha value. To achieve identical behaviour I just increased the alpha of mask. Here's what my code finally looks: public static Bitmap blend(Bitmap back, Bitmap front, BlendMethod method, float alpha) { if (alpha ...


2

Try this: public class TransparentCircle extends View { Bitmap bm; Canvas cv; Paint eraser; public TransparentCircle(Context context) { super(context); Init(); } public TransparentCircle(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) { super(context, attrs); Init(); } public ...


2

Everything is ok in your code except one thing: you get black background because your window is opaque. To achieve transparent result you should draw on another bitmap. In your onDraw method please a create new bitmap and do all the staff on it. After that draw this bitmap on your canvas. For details and sample code please read this my answer:


2

Here's a suggestion using a custom layout. You'll need your own layout for the scrabble board. Since it's grid, this should be pretty easy to code. The basic idea is to have a set of PNG shadow images, one for each type of combination of adjacent cells. In your layout onDraw(), draw the shadows first, then draw the tile in onLayout(). In onDraw(), ...


1

You can subclass ImageView and override its onDraw() method. I am posting a minimalictic solution, modify to your needs! public class OverlayImageView extends ImageView { Paint paint; float padding = 30; public OverlayImageView(Context context) { super(context); init(); } public OverlayImageView(Context context, ...


1

Path simply cannot do this. Never fear, there is a better way! The trick is to split the path into many smaller sections and draw each section separately. In my case, I was creating a path from a series of points (generated from touch input) and drawing quadratic beziers to connect the points. Here is a quick outline: int numPoints = 0; for (Point p : ...


1

I don't think you can assign ColorFilters for each Drawable in a StateListDrawable. Reason: The ColorFilter will be removed/replaced when the StateListDrawable changes state. To see this in action, change the order of the statements such that: background.setColorFilter(Color.RED, PorterDuff.Mode.DST_IN); comes after the creation of the StateListDrawable. ...


1

If I could simply comment I would, because I'm not sure I'm correct here. So buyer beware, here it goes: I think you may be able to achieve this effect by taking advantage of View.OnDragEve[]ntListener. Here's the documentation. I think you should tweak the drag and drop trigger model used in android (ie the means of communicating between app and OS). How ...


1

After some research I came to following conclusions regarding PorterDuff Color modes in Android, Sa and Sc are Source Alpha and Source Color, e.g. if I am setting ColorFilter to a drawable like myDrawable.setColorFilter(desiredColor,Mode.SRC_ATOP) the Sa and Sc values will be taken from desiredColor not from myDrawable. Da and Dc will be original ...


1

Actually I find where were my problem. In my Custom View that I was using for drawing and etc I was doing this @Override protected void onSizeChanged(int w, int h, int oldw, int oldh) { super.onSizeChanged(w, h, oldw, oldh); mBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(w, h, Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888); mCanvas = new Canvas(mBitmap); ...


1

Good sample code related to drawing arcs / semi circles is available on the Android Developer site here. For your specific case, I see two approaches. One is to ditch the PNG file entirely and just draw the circle (best if there's nothing special about the circle: It's just one color, etc). If you definitely want to use the PNG file, then you can draw ...



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