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21

Do you want your main thread to do anything in particular after all the threads have completed? If not, you can have your main thread simply call pthread_exit() instead of returning (or calling exit()). If main() returns it implicitly calls (or behaves as if it called) exit(), which will terminate the process. However, if main() calls pthread_exit() ...


17

The proper way is to keep track of all of your pthread_id's, but you asked for a quick and dirty way so here it is. Basically: just keep a total count of running threads, increment it in the main loop before calling pthread_create, decrement the thread count as each thread finishes. Then sleep at the end of the main process until the count returns to ...


15

O_NONBLOCK is a property of the open file description, not of the file descriptor, nor of the underlying file. Yes, you could have separate file descriptors open for the same file, one of which is blocking and the other of which is non-blocking. You need to distinguish between a FIFO (created using mkfifo()) and a pipe (created using pipe()). Note that ...


13

SUA, formerly called INTERIX, is now 100% POSIX compatible. There are a lot of ported apps for it. Even whole Linux distros like Debian have been ported. SUA/Interix comes with Windows 2003R2 and up (including Win7 which has the latest 6.1). I also successfully compiled BASH without it directly supporting SUA. Previously only parts of POSIX were ...


13

You could look into dprintf (GNU extensions, not in C or POSIX) : The functions dprintf() and vdprintf() (as found in the glibc2 library) are exact analogues of fprintf() and vfprintf(), except that they output to a file descriptor fd instead of to a given stream. EDIT As pointed by several of you in the comments, POSIX 2008 standardized ...


10

The system C headers usually already include a extern "C" block, guarded by #ifdef __cplusplus. This way the functions automatically get declared as extern "C" when compiled as C++ and you don't need to do that manually. For example on my system unistd.h and fcntl.h start with __BEGIN_DECLS and end with __END_DECLS, which are macros defined in sys/cdefs.h: ...


9

IIRC if you do #define _LARGEFILE_SOURCE #define _FILE_OFFSET_BITS 64 before all other includes you do not need to pass this flag. additionally see


9

Yes, waitpid will work after the child has exited. The OS will keep a child process' entry in the process table (including exit status) around until the parent calls waitpid (or another wait-family function) or until the parent exits (at which point the status is collected by the init process). This is what a "zombie" process is: a process that has exited by ...


8

O_LARGEFILE should never be used directly by applications. It's to be used internally by the 64-bit-offset-compatible version of open in libc when it makes the syscall to the kernel (Linux, or possibly another kernel with this 64-bit-offset-mode-is-a-second-class-citizen nonsense). Just make sure to always include -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64 in your CFLAGS and ...


5

There is no C or POSIX standard function to do printf on a file descriptor, but you can “open” a file descriptor as a FILE * with the POSIX-standard fdopen(int desc, const char *mode). I'm not sure how well supported flipping back to using the descriptor directly is, but I'm guessing it might work if you flush the buffer first… Of course you could just ...


5

I believe you can pare your program down to this, if you don't need to provide a whole new pty to the subprocess: from argparse import ArgumentParser import os import signal import subprocess import itertools # your argumentparser stuff goes here def become_tty_fg(): os.setpgrp() hdlr = signal.signal(signal.SIGTTOU, signal.SIG_IGN) tty = ...


5

The purpose is to implement ~[username]/ remapping logic. This sort of code makes sense in Linux/UNIX environments, but the most common use is just to refer to the user's own home directory. For expediency, I'd just add support for the common case - ~/ - i.e. the current user, and not bother supporting the more general case - have it fail with an obvious ...


5

Signal are "handed off" to a process by the kernel, so sending a signal from processA to processB employs the kernel. When SIGKILL is delivered the kernel does not allow any activity by the process (user mode), specifically process rundown: atexit calls, _exit. Nothing. The process is simply destroyed by the system. This involves some activity in kernel ...


4

The standard answer is to call stat on the directory, then check the st_nlink field ("number of hard links"). On a standard filesystem, each directory is guaranteed to have 2 hard links (. and the link from the parent directory to the current directory), so each hard link beyond 2 indicates a subdirectory (specifically, the subdirectory's .. link to the ...


4

The behavior of <fcntl.h> and <unistd.h> in C++ is not specified by the standard (because they are also not part of the C89 standard). That said, I have never seen a platform where they (a) exist and (b) actually need to be wrapped in an extern "C" block. The behavior of <stdio.h>, <math.h>, and the other standard C headers is ...


4

When you say you don't want to change the library code, do you mean you want to use existing binary code, or just source? If you have the source and can recompile, I would simply pass -Dread=my_read -Dopen=my_open etc. to the compiler when building the library, and then provide your own my_read etc. functions.


4

To gain perspective on why this might be the case, understand that end-of-stream is not inherently a permanent situation. A file's read pointer could be at the end, but if more data is subsequently appended by a write operation, then subsequent reads will succeed. Example: In Linux, when reading from the console, a new line followed by ^D will cause ...


3

One thing you can try is library function interposition.


3

Your proposal still has a race condition: Mallory creates the link he wants you to follow; You open() the link with O_CREAT; Mallory replaces the link with a regular file; You do your lstat() test, which passes (not a link); Mallory replaces the regular file with the link again. You can fix this for the non-O_TRUNC case by calling fstat() on your open ...


3

Your other answer simply unsets O_NONBLOCK, which sets the file back to blocking. That's perfectly fine, if that works in your situation; but if not, you can use select() to block until your non-blocking file descriptor is readable.


3

The OS keeps terminated process in a zombie state until its parent (which might be the init if the original parent process terminated earlier) collects that exit status with wait(2) system call. So the answer is - the exit status of the process does not become invalid.


3

This is the raw bits that go over the wire (OSI layer 2). The man page for packet explains it pretty well. What I would do is to get the output of this and compare it to the output of a Wireshark session looking at the same data. You then should be able to correlate the two and see what's going on.


3

In POSIX systems (like Linux), perror is thread-safe. perror is not listed as non-thread safe here: All functions defined by this volume of POSIX.1-2008 shall be thread-safe, except that the following functions1 need not be thread-safe. [...] http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/V2_chap02.html


3

This typically happens when a file contains the value 0x1a (aka control-Z). Like MS-DOS before it, Windows interprets control-Z as signaling the end of a text file, so when you open a file in text mode, and it reaches a 0x1a, it'll simply stop reading. As you've already found, opening the file in binary mode fixes the problem--the 0x1a is no longer ...


2

Chapter 7 of the Linux SCSI Generic (sg) HOWTO gives an example of how to do this: int flags = fcntl(fd, F_GETFL); fcntl(fd, F_SETFL, flags & (~O_NONBLOCK));


2

Yes. From the man page: A child that terminates, but has not been waited for becomes a "zombie". The kernel maintains a minimal set of information about the zombie process (PID, termination status, resource usage information) in order to allow the parent to later perform a wait to obtain information about the child.


2

The possibilities you've mentioned (as well as e.James's) seem to me like they're better suited to a shell script than a C++ program. Presuming the "C++" tag was intentional, I think you'd probably be better off using the POSIX API directly: // warning: untested code. bool has_subdir(char const *dir) { std::string dot("."), dotdot(".."); bool ...


2

No, there isn't as standard, but the two do different things. fprinft, as part of stdio, does things like buffer reads and writes, supports ungetc etc. Using a fd bypasses all that and calls the OS directly. So they're not interchangeable. Flip flopping between them would screw up stdio buffering if nothing else


2

If you don't want to keep track of your threads then you can detach the threads so you don't have to care about them, but in order to tell when they are finished you will have to go a bit further. One trick would be to keep a list (linked list, array, whatever) of the threads' statuses. When a thread starts it sets its status in the array to something ...


2

Yes, the shell will fork the script and return immediately, but you don't have an easy way of knowing how and whether the script has ended. The "proper" way to run such an asynchronous command would be to fork(2) your process, call execve(2) in the child with the binary set to /bin/sh and one of the arguments set to the name of your script, and poll the ...



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