Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I believe that you are correct when you say: It seems to me that as soon as read() gets a single byte, then it disregards VTIME. Return value for read(): On success, the number of bytes read is returned (zero indicates end of file), and the file position is advanced by this number. It is not an error if this number is smaller than the ...


1

You have set -std=c11 -Wpedantic, which means that the normal defines are not available and POSIX function are not declared unless you explicitly set one of _POSIX_C_SOURCE or _XOPEN_SOURCE. Add #define _XOPEN_SOURCE 700 (or even 800 on Linux) before the first #include and all will be well. You have CPPFLAGS = -D_XOPEN_SOURCE=700 in the makefile; does ...


1

It looks like you are doing it to yourself. Consider this excerpt of the second code: user_sigval.sival_int = getppid(); sigqueue(pid, SIGRTMIN, user_sigval); Now look at the central part of the first code: sig=sigwaitinfo(&sigset, &siginfo); int pid = siginfo.si_value.sival_int; if (sig!=-1){ if (POcupadas != N){ ...


1

The shmat calls only gets a pointer to a shared memory segment that should have previously be created with shmget. You have 2 ways to deal with that : allocate a segment that will hold an array for all your structs and then copy your structs to this array : m_sharedMemoryId = shmget(key, sizeof(struct s) * nb, perm_flag); struct s* data = ...


5

You aren't using anything but automatic variables in your code, and the only function-call (clock_gettime) is inherently thread-safe, so the answer is: Yes, it's safe. From the POSIX spec: 3.396 Thread-Safe A function that may be safely invoked concurrently by multiple threads. Each function defined in the System Interfaces volume of IEEE Std ...


0

I don't think you are missing anything here. The InnoDB developers are being conservative. I expect that they tested fdatasync on a variety of Unix platforms, and discovered that this sometimes caused corruption on some systems. Similar to what they found with O_DSYNC. Weighing data corruption against performance, the InnoDB developers are playing it safe, ...


2

The simplest answer is that access() works the way the standard says it should: The access() function shall check the file named by the pathname pointed to by the path argument for accessibility according to the bit pattern contained in amode, using the real user ID in place of the effective user ID and the real group ID in place of the effective group ...


0

Per the Linux man page, "This allows set-user-ID programs to easily determine the invoking user’s authority." I suppose this is actually the crux of the function. Any program can just attempt the desired type of access and handle failure if it happens. Most do. You need to check access separately only if you care whether the answer differs from what you ...


0

I know this answer is bit outdated, but it would supplement answers above. Yes, Android is not POSIX-compatible, mainly because of it's libc (Bionic) restrictions. However, using CrystaX NDK you may not feel that difference so hard - just because using CrystaX NDK development for Android become much more POSIX-compatible. We've implemented many libc parts ...


0

You should implement a "disposed" state of your ReadWriteLock instance (the "active" field looks appropriate, but you don't use it, why?). Check it twice in rwl_writeLock / rwl_readLock, before and after the sem_wait() call. This trick is well-known as a "double-checking lock pattern". If you find your Lock to be deleted before entering sem_wait, just ...


2

Measuring time is a complex problem. Generally the best way is to use clock_gettime(). It supports several clocks with different characteristics. Check this link for more information.


1

The tv_usec field is the time elapsed in microseconds, and the tv_sec is the time elpased in seconds. So multipliying tv_sec field by 1000 you convert seconds to milliseconds, and dividing tv_usec by 1000 you convert the microseconds to milliseconds. I was going to suggest clock_gettime() but before I added that, Let_Me_Be posted an answer suggesting that. ...


3

"Random thread" doesn't means that it is delivered to a thread chosen at random, but that it can be delivered to any thread the implementers want. So random choice is a possibility, but any other choice is possible. On your system the choice is: the main thread first if possible. You may read the OpenGroup Signal Concepts document. There is no "random" ...


0

Changed to this ugly format and it works: pid_t child_pid; char a1[] = "rsync"; char a2[] = "-avWh"; char a3[] = "--port=1873"; char *argv[] = {a1, a2, a3, remote_dir, local_dir, (char*)0}; if (0 != posix_spawn(&child_pid, "/usr/bin/rsync", NULL, NULL, argv, environ)) { logger::error("posix spawn"); ...


1

When you type a command in a Linux shell, to decide what to do, the shell first looks if there is a / in it. If there is not, it looks for: An internal shell command. An executable file in some of the directories listed in the $PATH environment variable. If there is a / in the name, then it looks for a file with that name, always. And the ., as you ...


1

If you do a ls -al, it lists current directory's files and folders, you will notice that it shows a . as an entry. This corresponds to a reference to the current directory. To we are telling the shell to execute a.out file that is relative to the current directory when we say ./a.out


2

This is not related to c++. Its for unix like operating systems. The ./ says look in the current directory for my script rather than looking at all the directories specified in $PATH


1

. is the current directory (like .. is the parent of the current directory) so ./a.out means "run the a.out program from the current directory". It's for people that don't have . in their path. That's a good idea if you share your box or are overly paranoid but, for a home box, it's probably easier just to add . to the end of the path so you don't have to ...


0

I'm not allowed to comment on the first (and accepted) answer (not enough rep), so I'll post my comments as code in a new answer. The code below is based on the first answer, but fixes a number of problems: If called with a zero-length path, this does not read or write the character before the beginning of array opath[] (yes, "why would you call it that ...


0

The t flag is called a sticky bit. A sticky bit is a permission bit that is set on a directory that allows only the owner of the file within that directory or the root user to delete or rename the file. No other user has the needed privileges to delete the file created by some other user. This is a security measure to avoid deletion of critical folders and ...


2

things could be done pretty easy in C++11. #include <chrono> using std::chrono::high_resolution_clock; using std::chrono::milliseconds; using std::chrono::nanoseconds; auto t0 = high_resolution_clock::now(); // do something here ... auto t1 = high_resolution_clock::now(); // get miliseconds result. milliseconds total_milliseconds = ...


1

For the C++11 way, check the answer of bames53. This gives the time in nanoseconds. In Ubuntu, C++, you need to add -lrt to the list of libraries you link to. Example (in a mainfile): mm: main.cpp memory_manager.cc g++ -Wextra -Wall -Wreorder -o mm main.cpp memory_manager.cc -lrt #include <cstdint> // C++11. Use #include <stdint.h> instead ...


0

Answering my own question - trying to mark this closed. There is no issue in the code. The problem was in the environment. I was relying on a ssh tunnel which was destroyed when the invoking shell was closed. Silly me. So how do I mark this closed?


0

If you pass "" to the locale parameter newlocale will allocate a locale object set to the current native locale[1] [1]http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/newlocale.html static locale_t locale; bool MyStrerrorInit(void) { locale = newlocale(LC_CTYPE_MASK|LC_NUMERIC_MASK|LC_TIME_MASK| ...


0

Here is a one liner that does this, just replace username with the username you want to kill things for. Don't even think on putting root there! pkill -9 -u `id -u username` Note: if you want to be nice remove -9, but it will not kill all kinds of processes.


1

Check whether the macro __WINPTHREADS_VERSION is defined. If so, you are using posix threads on MinGW. For example: #if defined(_WIN32) && !defined(__WINPTHREADS_VERSION) Logic for MinGW win32 threads; #else Logic for MinGW posix threads or Linux/UNIX; #endif Examples/References: http://savannah.gnu.org/support/?108150#comment0 ...


0

uint64_t userAvailableFreeSpace() { struct statvfs stat; struct passwd *pw = getpwuid(getuid()); if ( NULL != pw && 0 == statvfs(pw->pw_dir, &stat) ) { uint64_t freeBytes = (uint64_t)stat.f_bavail * stat.f_frsize; return freeBytes; } return 0ULL; }


0

I can see several problems: do you need the isEmpty? does length==0 means empty? That cause some problem because in Queue_pop method you decrease the length without checking whether the queue is empty at that time, which will lead to inconsistence between isEmpty and length. In your code below, if item is queue->last. you will set last to NULL. But the ...


0

You can use this: if [ -n "$FLAG_VERBOSE" ]; then CHATTINESS=; else CHATTINESS=--quiet; fi some_chatty_cmd $CHATTINESS ${FLAG_VERBOSE:+ --verbose} arg arg arg


0

Any library that directly links into your program or is a direct dependency still gets mapped and loaded at run time. To see what libraries will be open, you can use ldd some_program. Some of these will be indirect dependencies that will also be loaded. To see only what the direct depencies are you can use objdump -x my_program | grep NEEDED. Not only ...


0

In Linux, we use -lpthread to link to pthread.so, the dynamic pthread lib. in Windows, I think it's almost the same, like "-L /your/path/to/pthreadGC2.dll -lpthreadGC2". Try some commands like this


3

From linux man pages read(2) manual: RETURN VALUE On success, the number of bytes read is returned (zero indicates end of file), and the file position is advanced by this number. It is not an error if this number is smaller than the number of bytes requested; this may happen for example because fewer bytes are actually available right now (maybe ...


5

I ran into this problem myself when trying to port a library I was working on to OS X. I searched for a while without finding a great answer. When I did find the answer, I was a bit perturbed: the answer is effectively "if Apple implemented POSIX unnamed semaphores, how many X Serves would you buy?". To summarize the points of why they are deprecated and ...


1

The Linux manpage for gettaddrinfo(2) describes it slightly differently (and a bit more consistently): If the AI_PASSIVE flag is specified in hints.ai_flags, and node is NULL, then the returned socket addresses will be suitable for bind(2)ing a socket that will accept(2) connections. The returned socket address will contain the "wildcard address" ...


1

It is not possible :-( Your options are: Use ls and parse that with awk; the output of ls -l is in POSIX, so you can rely on that. This works okay for some fields (such as the owner in your example), and not so good for others (such as the mtime). Detect the stat version and switch parameters; GNU stat has -f, BSD stat -c, other versions perhaps something ...


1

The short answer is no, POSIX does not provide a simple way to get the same output as stat. However, you can usually get relevant bits using other tools. To get the owner specifically: ls -ld /path/of/file/or/directory | awk '{print $3}'


0

It's really simple void dir(DIR *f, char *file_name, char *dir_name) { struct dirent *a; int n = 0; while ((a = readdir(f)) != NULL) { if (strcmp(a->d_name,".") != 0 && strcmp(a->d_name,"..") != 0 && a->d_type == 4) { char s1[250]; DIR *next; strcpy(s1, dir_name); ...


1

I thought about it, tried it out, but in time find the solution. for(loop = i; loop >= start; loop--) { // change loop > start to >= if(/*(counter == 0) &&*/ (buffer[loop] == 10)) { and: if(i > start) { counter = 0; for(loop = i-1; loop > start; loop--) {


1

Unfortunately, there is no way to query which source IP address is used. On Windows, for example, you would have to write a low-level NDIS driver to get that info. However, if you use WSASendMsg()/sendmsg() instead of sendto(), you can pass in an in_pktinfo structure to specify the source IP address you want to use for the outgoing packet.


5

You should pass the highest file descriptor value + 1, that's why n == 0 n = select( session_ref->fd, &fds, NULL, NULL, &timeout ); // n = 0 has to be n = select( 1 + session_ref->fd, &fds, NULL, NULL, &timeout ); // n = 0 and then check how many files in the set are ready if ((n > 1) && (FD_ISSET( ...


1

If the socket is 4, you need select to look for at least five possible sockets, 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4. So your first parameter to select is one too few.


0

Here is the changelog for xpg-strerror.c: 2011-05-21 Ulrich Drepper Always fill output buffer in XPG strerror function blob | commitdiff | diff to current 2010-12-25 Ulrich Drepper Change XPG-compliant strerror_r function to return... blob | commitdiff | diff to current So if I assume a decent version of glibc, everything seems to be fine. Unless ...


0

None of this seems to work with a compiled AppleScript saved as an application and placed on the Dock. Whenever you run the application, IT is the frontmost, not the application that is showing its front window. That application becomes inactive as my Applescript runs. How do I write an Applescript application that isn't active when it runs? I may have ...


1

You need to do this. Use shm_open in each process to get a file descriptor. You must pass shm_open the same name in each process. The name is what distinguishes the shared memory region from other shared memory regions. The name must begin with a slash: "/somename". Use the file descriptor obtained in step 1 to call mmap. The address returned from mmap is ...


1

Using posix_spawn(), to answer your question: #include <spawn.h> extern char **environ; (...) pid_t pid; char *argv[] = { "/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/usr/bin/opendiff", "/Users/LukeSkywalker/Documents/doc1.rtf", "/Users/LukeSkywalker/Documents/doc2.rtf", NULL }; posix_spawn(&pid, argv[0], NULL, NULL, argv, ...


4

You seem to be seeking to find a defined standard for bash, as there is for C. Unfortunately, there isn't one. There are really only two guides: Volume 3 (Shell and Utilities) of the Open Group Base Specifications, commonly known as "Posix", which is deliberately underspecified. It does state that arithmetic evaluation "be equivalent to that described in ...


3

Looking at the bash code (bash 4.3), source expr.c, I see the following: /* post-increment or post-decrement */ if (stok == POSTINC || stok == POSTDEC) { /* restore certain portions of EC */ tokstr = ec.tokstr; noeval = ec.noeval; curlval = ec.lval; lasttok = STR; /* ec.curtok */ ...


0

To resurrect this old thread, I just did some simple test code: #include <thread> int main(int argc, char** argv) { for (volatile int i = 0; i < 500000; i++) std::thread([](){}).detach(); return 0; } I compiled it with g++ test.cpp -std=c++11 -lpthread -O3 -o test. I then ran it three times in a row on an old (kernel 2.6.18) heavily ...


0

It looks like Microsoft's Parallel Patterns Library (PPL) is now truly cross-platform! It seems that with the recent sea change at Microsoft the latest version of their C++ REST SDK (Casablanca) they now support all platforms (Windows / Mac / Linux / Android and iOS). What is of interest, is that this REST SDK also bundles a version of the Parallel ...


2

Here is a version of the code that actually compiles and links cleanly: #define _XOPEN_SOURCE (1) // needed by sys/ipc.h #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/ipc.h> #include <sys/sem.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> // exit() #include <string.h> #include <strings.h> // bzero()) #include ...



Top 50 recent answers are included