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3

Way back in the day (we're talking IE6/7 here!), I recall benchmarking both forms and found that there was a small performance improvement with ++i instead of i++. My (unproven) theory was that a non-optimizing JS engine had to do a tiny bit more work in the i++ case: it had to save the previous value in case it would be used - and being a non-optimizing ...


0

In JS and PHP it does not make any difference, I think even in Java it does not make any difference but in pure c when compiler is not optimizing code it does, and that is why a lot of people use ++i because they are used to it from c. EDIT: This is an answer for JS if you want history of pre and post increment searc C/C++ pre/post increment. Or see ...


4

The difference is that i++ returns the value of i before incrementing and ++i the value of i after incrementing. There is no difference if you ignore the return value, e.g. in: for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) { } The habit of using ++i over i++ comes from C, where people were worried that storing the old value for i in i++ would incur a performance ...


2

There is a difference, however not when used in a for loop. In an expression, i++ evaluates to the previous value of i, and then i is incremented. ++i increments first, and evaluates then. For this reason, some programmers prefer to write ++i in their for-loops — either because they're used to it, or because they feel it is "more right" somehow. edit: ...


0

I added a setPlayerX method, and changed the assignment in moveDown to what you see here. It works now, so I figured it out. public void setPlayerX(int x) { x = 1; playerX = x; } public void moveDown(int height, int width, int x, int y) { x++; playerX = playerX + x; displayWorld(height, width, x, y); }


2

This function: int f(int& a) accepts non-const reference. Such references must always point to a valid objects, residing at certain memory locations (*). Post incrementation works as follows: - save current value as `r` - increment original variable - return `r` That's because result of post-incrementation is a temporary, yielding value from ...


2

The postfix increment operator on an int returns a temporary value. A temporary value cannot bind to a non-const lvalue reference, because modifying that temporary doesn't make sense. You are trying to bind the temporary to an int&, which is giving an error. To fix this, either use the pre-increment operator (++a), or take your argument by value (it's ...


6

You can't bind a temporary to a non-const reference. Post-increment (a++) increments a and returns a temporary with a's old value. Why are you passing by non-const reference? - it doesn't look like you're changing the parameter inside the function, just just pass by value or const reference. If you were changing the parameter, what would you expect the ...


1

The loop continues until x > 9. The first value for this condition to be true is 10.


3

As long as x <= 9, the while loop won't be terminated, so x must by 10 after the loop.


2

Let's look at a simpler piece of code to show what a++ does. int a = 0; int b = a++; printf("%d %d\n", a, b); I think that you'd expect this to output 1 1. In reality, it will output 1 0! This is because of what a++ does. It increments the value of a, but the value of the expression a++ is the initial pre-incremented value of a. If we wanted to write ...


2

The post increment operator increments the value of the variable before it after the execution of the statement. Let's take an example, int k = 5 ; printf("%d\n", k++ ); printf("%d", k ); will output 5 6 because in the first printf(), the output is shown and only after that, the value is incremented. So, lets look at your code while(a++ < 10) ...


1

Because it's post-increment. The compiler will first evaluate a<10 and THEN increment a by 1.


4

Let's look at a++ < 10 when a is equal to 10. The first thing that will happen is 10 < 10 will be evaluated (to false), and then a will be incremented to 11. Then your printf statement outside the while loop executes. When the ++ comes on the right hand side of the variable, it's the last thing evaluated on the line. Try changing a++ < 10 to ...


-1

The order in which arguments to a function are evaluated is unspecified. It's your responsibility to write code that works the same regardless of this order.



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