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69

In C++ The result of pow(0, 0) the result is basically implementation defined behavior since mathematically we have a contradictory situation where N^0 should always be 1 but 0^N should always be 0 for N > 0, so you should have no expectations mathematically as to the result of this either. This Wolfram Alpha forum posts goes into a bit more details. ...


62

pow works with double numbers. These represent numbers of the form s * 2^e where s is a 53 bit integer. Therefore double can store all integers below 2^53, but only some integers above 2^53. In particular, it can only represent even numbers > 2^53, since for e > 0 the value is always a multiple of 2. 17^13 needs 54 bits to represent exactly, so e is set to ...


31

Just compute it as 2^(y*log2(x)). There is a x86 instruction FYL2X to compute y*log2(x) and a x86 instruction F2XM1 to do exponentiation. F2XM1 requires an argument in [-1,1] range, so you'd have to add some code in between to extract the integer part and the remainder, exponentiate the remainder, use FSCALE to scale the result by an appropriate power of 2. ...


31

In JavaScript Math.pow is defined as follows: If y is NaN, the result is NaN. If y is +0, the result is 1, even if x is NaN. If y is −0, the result is 1, even if x is NaN. If x is NaN and y is nonzero, the result is NaN. If abs(x)>1 and y is +∞, the result is +∞. If abs(x)>1 and y is −∞, the result is +0. If abs(x)==1 and y is +∞, the ...


23

(-1.07)1.3 will not be a real number, thus the Math domain error. If you need a complex number, ab must be rewritten into eb ln a, e.g. >>> import cmath >>> cmath.exp(1.3 * cmath.log(-1.07)) (-0.6418264288034731-0.8833982926856789j) If you just want to return NaN, catch that exception. >>> import math >>> def ...


18

Yes, it is normal. For many linkers, the order in which you specify the object files and the libraries matters. To quote "An Introduction to GCC - for the GNU compilers gcc and g++": The traditional behavior of linkers is to search for external functions from left to right in the libraries specified on the command line. This means that a library ...


16

The solution for arguments under 1.7976931348623157E308 (Double.MAX_VALUE) but supporting results with MILLIONS of digits: Since double supports numbers up to MAX_VALUE (for example, 100! in double looks like this: 9.332621544394415E157), there is no problem to use BigDecimal.doubleValue(). But you shouldn't just do Math.pow(double, double) because if the ...


15

At that range, the difference between successive double values is 32. 150094635296999121 is the correct answer as an integer, but that number cannot be exactly represented as a double. You can use BigInteger to get the exact answer: Math.pow(9, 18) == 150094635296999136 BigInteger.valueOf(9).pow(18) == 150094635296999121


15

It is just convention to define it as 1, 0 or to leave it undefined. The definition is wide spread because of the following definition: ECMA-Script documentation says the following about pow(x,y): If y is +0, the result is 1, even if x is NaN. If y is −0, the result is 1, even if x is NaN. [ ...


14

Well, hold on now. The library isn't calling __slowpow() just to toy with you; it's calling __slowpow() because it believes the extra precision is necessary to give an accurate result for the values you're giving it (in this case, base very near 1, exponent of order 1). If you care about the accuracy of this computation, you should understand why that is ...


13

According to Wikipedia: In most settings not involving continuity in the exponent, interpreting 00 as 1 simplifies formulas and eliminates the need for special cases in theorems. There are several possible ways to treat 0**0 with pros and cons to each (see Wikipedia for an extended discussion). The IEEE 754-2008 floating point standard recommends ...


13

The numbers you get are too big to be represented with a double accurately. A double-precision floating-point number has essentially 53 significant binary digits and can represent all integers up to 2^53 or 9,007,199,254,740,992. For higher numbers, the last digits get truncated and the result of your calculation is rounded to the next number that can be ...


13

If your input arguments are non-negative integers, then you can implement your own pow. Recursively: unsigned long long pow(unsigned long long x,unsigned int y) { if (y == 0) return 1; return pow(x,y/2)*pow(x,y-y/2); } Iteratively: unsigned long long pow(unsigned long long x,unsigned int y) { unsigned long long res = 1; while ...


12

It's a very interesting behavior, and a good learning example. To solve your problem, add -lm to your gcc command line (provided you're using gcc). This tells the compiler to link against the math library. What seems to be going on, is that if you're using pow(2.0, 3); the compiler realizes this expression evaluates to a constant, and does mere ...


12

pow(x, y) from <cmath> does NOT work if x is negative and y is non-integral. This is from the C99 Standard, section 7.12.7.4. Description 2 The pow functions compute x raised to the power y. A domain error occurs if x is finite and negative and y is finite and not an integer value. A domain error may occur if x is zero and y is less than or ...


12

Seems to be exactly as specified; from the Math.Pow() remarks section on Pow(x,y); Parameters x < 0 but not NegativeInfinity; y is not an integer, NegativeInfinity, or PositiveInfinity. Result NaN


11

Mathematically, pow(-1, 1.2) is simply not defined. There are no powers with fractional exponents of negative numbers, and I hope there is no library that will simply return some arbitray value for such an expression. Would you also expect things like pow(-1, 0.5) = ((-1)^2)^(1/4) = 1 which obviously isn't desirable. Moreover, the floating point number ...


11

My guess is that you're taking the cube root of a negative number. That seems the most likely cause, but your code is really hard to read due to having both x and X as local variables... After closer examination, as you're not actually modifying x at any point, it really depends on the incoming value of x. If it's a finite value greater than or equal to 2, ...


10

It's a precedence thing. Google thinks (-1)0 = 1, as does Python: >>> (-1)**0 1 Any nonzero number raised by the exponent 0 is 1.


9

Quite often, an include file such as <math.h> will include other header files that actually declare the functions you would expect to see in <math.h>. The idea is that the program gets what it expects when it includes <math.h>, even if the actual function definitions are in some other header file. Finding the implementation of a standard ...


9

You can use the pown function let result = pown 42I 42 pown works on any type that 'understands' multiplication and 'one'.


9

The algorithm uses repeated squaring (squareToLen) and multiplication (multiplyToLen). The time for these operations to run depends on the size of the numbers involved. The multiplications of the large numbers near the end of the calculation are much more expensive than those at the start. The multiplication is only done when this condition is true: ...


9

Don't use pow, and make the exponent complex (add 0j to it). Here is an example: In [15]: (-1.07)**(1.3+0j) Out[15]: (-0.64182642880347307-0.88339829268567893j) No need for math functions :)


9

If you want to raise negative numbers to powers -- especially fractional powers -- use the cpow() method. You'll need to include <complex> to use it.


9

You can see there all 3 cases when Math.Pow returns NaN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.math.pow.aspx public static double Pow(double x, double y) 1) x or y = NaN. 2) x < 0 but not NegativeInfinity; y is not an integer, NegativeInfinity, or PositiveInfinity. 3) x = -1; y = NegativeInfinity or PositiveInfinity.


9

Joachim's answer explains that pow is behaving according to its specification. Why is pow( ) specified that way? Because 1.0/7.0 is not equal to 1/7. You are asking for the 0.14285714285714285 power of -128.0, and there is no real number with that property, so the result is correctly NaN. For all odd n != 1, 1.0/(double)n is not exactly representable, so ...


9

std::pow() returns a floating point number. If the result is for instance 24.99999999 and you cast it to int, it will be cut off to 24. And that is what you do in the 2nd code example. cout does not convert to int and outputs the correct result in the 1st code example.


9

Your factor is (int)1 / (int)9 which is (int)0; Almost anything raised to the zeroth power is one you could do something like this double factor = 1/9.0; // make sure the 9 is a floating point


9

Remove the trailing semicolon from this line: #define M_PI 3.14159265358979323846; to have it look like this: #define M_PI 3.14159265358979323846 Macros are expanded by the pre-processor before compilation, so the code passed to the compiler using your version would look like: double d = pow(3.14159265358979323846; * 2, 0.5);


9

3/12, when you're doing integer math, is zero. In languages like, C, C++, ObjC and Java an expression like x / y containing only integers gives you an integral result, not a floating point one. I suggest you try 3.0/12.0 instead. The following C program (identical behaviour in this case to ObjC) shows this in action: #include <stdio.h> #include ...



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