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63

Here is a quick example that will get you the amount of battery used, the battery voltage, and its temperature. Paste the following code into an activity: @Override public void onCreate() { BroadcastReceiver batteryReceiver = new BroadcastReceiver() { int scale = -1; int level = -1; int voltage = -1; int temp = -1; ...


51

Try this answer: getWindow().addFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON); getWindow is a method defined for activities, and won't require you to find a View first.


27

As Hawk said but poorly explained. You can also use FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON in your XML layout file. Note the android:keepScreenOn="true" <LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="fill_parent" android:keepScreenOn="true" android:orientation="vertical" ...


22

You can register an Intent receiver to receive the broadcast for ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED: http://developer.android.com/reference/android/content/Intent.html#ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED. The docs say that the broadcast is sticky, so you'll be able to grab it even after the moment the battery state change occurs.


21

Like 1800 INFORMATION said, avoid polling; subscribe to events and wait for them to happen Update window content only when necessary - let the system decide when to redraw it When updating window content, ensure your code recreates as little of the invalid region as possible With quick code the CPU goes back to deep sleep mode faster and there's a better ...


21

voltage- int, current battery voltage in millivolts temperature - int, current battery temperature in tenths of a degree Centigrade From here.


16

You can subscribe to the SystemEvents.PowerModeChanged event. SystemEvents.PowerModeChanged += OnPowerChange; void OnPowerChange(Object sender, PowerModeChangedEventArgs e) { switch ( e.Mode ) { case PowerModes.Resume: ... case PowerModes.Suspend: ... } }


14

At the end of the day, Apple's suggestion of removing location from UIBackgroundModes fixed our battery drain issue. In order to still get locations in the background we had to wrap the [locationManager startLocationUpdates] & [locationManager stopLocationUpdates] calls with: [[UIApplication sharedApplication] beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler]; ...


12

To get the battery level right now, call: registerReceiver(null, new IntentFilter(Intent.ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED)); (note: typing that in from memory, please adjust if needed) This will return an Intent with various extras documented on the BatteryManager class. Use BatteryManager.EXTRA_LEVEL and BatteryManager.EXTRA_SCALE to determine the percentage ...


12

Don't have a laptop to test with, but I'm guessing you could use the WMI class Win32_Battery. It has two fields that look interesting - DesignCapacity, which tells you Design capacity of the battery in milliwatt-hours. and FullChargeCapacity, which has the fascinating note that Full charge capacity of the battery in milliwatt-hours. Comparison of ...


11

Don't use wake locks for this -- just set and clear the window flag WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON based on whether the device is currently plugged in. You can set the flag with Activity.getWindow().addFlags(). So the code would be getWindow().addFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON);


11

It's usually considered best practice to avoid polling and instead ask for notifications from the system, like so: [[UIDevice currentDevice] setBatteryMonitoringEnabled:YES]; [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(batteryLevelUpdate) name:UIDeviceBatteryLevelDidChangeNotification ...


11

Unfortunately, in most cases you cannot control the power supply to the USB port. The power supply is usually hardwired through, and not switchable in software. You can send a reset to a USB device, but that won't work in your case. There are a number of projects on instructables that do similar to what you describe, but unfortunately they seem to either ...


10

This might be of interest to you: Coding for battery life


10

if you mean changing the battery status on the emulator do the following. Connect to the emulator via telnet and change the status and capacity > telnet localhost 5554 Android Console: type 'help' for a list of commands OK power ac off OK power discharging OK power capacity 21 OK exit > Ahh, well you can do what it says on the page Ted mentioned, ...


10

The amount of data you hold in memory doesn't influence the battery life as the complete memory has to be refreshed all the time, whether you store something there or not (the memory controller doesn't know whether a part is "unused", AFAIK). By contrast, calculations do require power. Especially if they might wake up the CPU from an idle or low power ...


10

Use UIDevice property batteryState: [[UIDevice currentDevice] batteryState] == UIDeviceBatteryStateCharging From UIDevice Docs: typedef enum { UIDeviceBatteryStateUnknown, UIDeviceBatteryStateUnplugged, UIDeviceBatteryStateCharging, UIDeviceBatteryStateFull, } UIDeviceBatteryState; As for your 2nd question. I don't believe you can ...


9

Zeroith, use a fully static machine that can stop when idle. You can't beat zero Hz. First up, switch to a tickless operating system scheduler. Waking up every millisecend or so wastes power. If you can't, consider slowing the scheduler interrupt instead. Secondly, ensure your idle thread is a power save, wait for next interrupt instruction. You can do ...


9

I'm not sure what OS you're on, but windows sends a message that it is about to enter a new power state. You can listen for that and then either start processing on the CPU or deny the request to enter a lower-power state.


9

I was finally able to resolve this issue after seeing some demo code from Lance at HTC (thanks by the way). The secret seems to be to create an additional full wake lock with ACQUIRE_CAUSES_WAKEUP set. I don't release the original partial wake lock, but when I want to turn on the display I create the new full wake lock, do my stuff, then release the new ...


9

[[UIApplication sharedApplication] setIdleTimerDisabled:YES]


8

I think you'll have to P/Invoke. But don't be scared... it's pretty easy. SetThreadExecutionState is your friend. And PInvoke.net will tell you how to call this function from C#.


8

For the benefit of Linux users encountering a similar issue, I thought I'd add that, you can obtain similar notifications and inhibit power state changes using the DBUS API. An example script in Python, taken from the link, to inhibit power state change: #!/usr/bin/python import dbus import time bus = dbus.Bus(dbus.Bus.TYPE_SESSION) devobj = ...


8

We've deduced this started as of 2.0.1. It seems to be intentional, perhaps part of the battery life boost that was touted as a feature. We had a working shake to wakeup or unlock on 2.0, then it broke on the update and we haven't been able to get any kind of workaround. ;'( It doesn't matter if CPU partial lock is held which is supposed to always prevent ...


8

Yes, you can. The best you can do is use a red on black color scheme. Blue is more expensive than green, green more than red. White is the worst :) To give you an idea, a static blue wallpaper (for instance a jellyfish in an aquarium) consumes more battery than the 3D galaxy live wallpaper.


8

I haven't actually done this, but I have experience with the two apart (Linux and embedded power management). There are two main Linux distributions that come to mind when thinking about power management, Android and MeeGo. MeeGo uses (as far as I can tell) an unmodified 2.6 kernel with some extras hanging on. I wasn't able to find a lot on exactly what ...


8

Sorry I don't think this information is currently available. It is being collected, but at this point there is no UI for developers to retrieve it. (This is also true for reports coming about running services.)


8

I have successfully tested this on Windows XP and Windows 7: const MONITOR_ON = -1; MONITOR_OFF = 2; MONITOR_STANDBY = 1; To turn off the monitor: SendMessage(Application.Handle, WM_SYSCOMMAND, SC_MONITORPOWER, MONITOR_OFF); To turn on the monitor: SendMessage(Application.Handle, WM_SYSCOMMAND, SC_MONITORPOWER, MONITOR_ON);


8

It seems that you are looking for the values of FullChargeCapacity, DesignCapacity and CurrentCapacity. As someone who has solved this problem before, let me make a few comments. The first route normally taken would be through a WMI query (Win32_Battery). However, on the test laptops I ran the WMI query (Win32_Battery) against, which included multiple ...


8

First, you do not need the BATTERY_STATS permission. Second, the very first line of your onReceive() unregisters your BroadcastReceiver, thereby preventing you from getting any further updates. Third, there is no guarantee that you will have battery information delivered to you for each and every 1% change. Many Motorola phones, for example, only send ...



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