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12

When you call placement new on a buffer: A *a = new (buf) A; you are invoking the built-in void* operator new (std::size_t size, void* ptr) noexcept as defined in: c++11 18.6.1.3 Placement forms [new.delete.placement] These functions are reserved, a C++ program may not define functions that displace the versions in the Standard C++ library ...


10

Bingo. It is actually kind of a "bug" in binutils which they found and fixed in 2008. The size information is actually not useful! What Simon Baldwin wrote in the binutils mailing list describes exactly the problem ( emphases by me): Currently, the size of an undefined ELF symbol is copied out of the object file or DSO that supplies the symbol, on ...


9

It is implementation-defined whether char is signed or unsigned. Apparently it is signed on your x86 compiler and unsigned on your PowerPC compiler. For portability, use unsigned char or signed char wherever you care about the signedness.


8

In the Linux kernel we have this in arch/powerpc/include/asm/processor.h /* Macros for adjusting thread priority (hardware multi-threading) */ #define HMT_very_low() asm volatile("or 31,31,31 # very low priority") #define HMT_low() asm volatile("or 1,1,1 # low priority") #define HMT_medium_low() asm volatile("or 6,6,6 # medium low ...


8

You'd need to read through the code for the loader to be sure, but I think in this case we can make a fairly reasonable guess about what that length field is intended to accomplish. The loader needs to take all the functions that are going to be put into the process, and map them to memory addresses. So, it gives the first function an address. Then, the ...


7

Just because everything appears to work doesn't mean it actually does. C++ is a specification that defines what is required to work. The compiler can also make not required things work. That's what "undefined behavior" means: anything can happen, so your code isn't portable anymore. C++ does not require this to work. So if you take your code to a compiler ...


6

Shark analysis reveals that their inner loop uses dcbt to prefetch, with 4 vector reads, then 4 vector writes. After tweaking my best function to also haul 64 bytes per iteration I may be stating the obvious, but since you don't mention the following at all in your question, it may be worth pointing it out: I would bet that Apple's choice of 4 vectors ...


6

I think, the answer here is that compiler does not guarantee the order of global variables initialization. If your bind_view is called from constructor of another global variable - you'll have a floating bug. Try using the following approach: namespace Identity_VIEW { Published_view_identity & getRequestView() { static ...


6

In VxWorks, each task that utilises floating point has to be specified as such in the task creation so that the FP registers are saved during context switches, but only when switching from tasks that use floating point. This allows non-floating point tasks to have faster context switch times. When an interrupt pre-empts a floating point task however, it is ...


6

I'm not 100% sure that it solves all problems, but it works for us. We discovered that symlink "ld.so.1 -> ../../../ppc_8xx/lib/ld.so.1" to eldk-3.1/usr/ppc-linux/lib solves linking error. I suspect something changed with environment between F15 and F16. Same for OpenSUSE (11->12). Also bug was submitted against Fedora ...


5

Moonlight currently is made up of a few components: Mono Runtime (cross platform, works on many platforms, including PowerPC and OSX) Graphics engine (cross platform) Video engine (cross platform) Browser gate (currently only supports Firefox) Windowing system integration (currently only supports X11) There have been discussions about writing more ...


5

Here you go... I decided to try these out as well since Mike Acton claimed it would be faster than using the CELL/PS3 microcoded shift on his CellPerformance site where he suggests to avoid the indirect shift. However, in all my tests, using the microcoded version was not only faster than a full generic branch-free replacement for indirect shift, it takes ...


5

Just get an old PowerPC Mac, anything from an old System 7 machine to whenever they stopped selling PowerPC ones. http://www.google.com/products?q=g3+mac&hl=en&aq=f http://www.google.com/products?q=original+imac&hl=en&aq=f


5

You can try the PowerPC compiler writer's guide


5

Assuming your binary was built with debug info, you can get function type, argument types, etc. etc. by reading DWARF debug format, which readelf -wi will dump. If your binary was produced by IBM's compiler, it may have (older) STABS debug info instead, which you can dump with objdump -g. If your binary does not have the debug info, then you can't get the ...


5

According to the C standard (appendix J.5.10), asm is a common language extension. In gcc it is disallowed (together with all gcc extensions), if you use a flag like -std=c90, -std=c99 or -ansi. If you want C99 with gcc extensions, use -std=gnu99 instead.


4

Without a definition of "easy" im pretty sure most people would agree that the x86 instruction set is easily the most horrible for a mainstream popular CPU. If one were to write up a list of good or best practices one should follow when designing an instruction set, the x86 would be a good example of all the opposites. Not orthogonal, not all registers ...


4

How about this: if (y & 16) x <<= 16; if (y & 8) x <<= 8; if (y & 4) x <<= 4; if (y & 2) x <<= 2; if (y & 1) x <<= 1; will probably take longer yet to execute but easier to interleave if you have other code to go between.


4

I sometimes got similar errors on Linux, using -lm as a gcc parameter helped there. Perhaps it does here, too. The parameter tells the linker to include the math library, too.


4

There seems to be very little documentation available, especially on the side of doing drivers. talked to a long-time Linux kernel developer I know, and his advice was essentially to look at the code of other drivers. some background reading I found: Grant Likely presentation, Grant Likely Linux Symposium paper, a fairly good overview of the data structure ...


4

Following confirmation from other SO users I e-mailed the application note's author. He agreed that 0x10 should be 0x20 and may update the note in future.


4

You appear to be right. With their math stated at the top of the listing: ! CTR - the number of data blocks needed to fill the cache - save it in r3 ! 32K (size of cache) / 32 (bytes per block) = 0x400 They always set the count register to 0x400 and it states that there are 32bytes per block a few places in that document. So following that math you ...


4

Well, most RISCs are very much alike, so if you know the PPC well, then transitioning to ARM, MIPS, or SPARC will all be a snap. I actually learnt SPARC first and then was able to pick up a MIPS and the PPC in a couple of hours. The thing that makes the x86 so confusing isn't really its assembly language, but the design of the processor. People tend to get ...


4

Xcode can make a universal binary It can be tested using rosetta on your intel mac. To test with rosetta, select the file in finder, select file>>get info, tick "Open using rosetta", and then start the app It can not be tested on your PS3


4

Here's one: http://pds.twi.tudelft.nl/vakken/in101/labcourse/instruction-set/ EDIT: This one's better: The Programming Environments for 32-Bit Microprocessors


4

Does your ISR call the fppSave()/fppRestore() functions? If it doesn't, then the ISR is stomping on FP registers that might be in use by existing tasks. Specifically, FP registers are used by the C++ compiler on the PPC architecture (I think dealing with throw/catch).


4

Just compile the binutils cross. It is just a matter of ./configure --target=powerpc-linux \ --prefix=/usr/local/lib/powerpc-linux \ --bindir=/usr/local/bin --mandir=/usr/local/share/man --infodir=/usr/local/share/info \ --program-prefix=powerpc-linux \ --disable-werror make and in gas/ there will be a as-new (or powerpc-linux-as) AS is not the ...


4

There are some fairly recent Windows Binaries of QEMU available at this address : http://lassauge.free.fr/qemu/ Furthermore, some Ready-to-download VM for various architectures, including PowerPC, have been prepared by Aurelien Jarno, and can be downloaded at this adress : http://blog.aurel32.net/46


4

Compilers are fairly free to do what they like so far as how memory locations line up with the members of structs and unions and other complex data structures. I have seen mysterious run time errors using structs that were due to alignment boundary issues because one part of the source saw the struct one way and another saw it a different way. C basically ...



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