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6

From the horse's mouth : We’ve reimplemented the STL’s multithreading primitives to avoid using the Concurrency Runtime (ConcRT). Using ConcRT was a good idea at the time (2012), but it proved to be more trouble than it was worth. Now we’re using the Windows API directly IIRC, PPL was also based on ConcRT, but that doesn't mean that the ...


5

Yes and No. for std::thread: std::thread constructor (thread file) calls _Launch (xthread file) which calls _Thrd_startX (xthread file) which calls _Thrd_start(cthread.c file) which calls _beginthreadex (cthread.c file). I don't have _beginthreadex code, but in the file atlbase.h, some microsoft developer left the following comment : // ...


4

Declare a field to get hold of that interface: FXlsFuture: IFuture<TsmXLSFile>; Add a method to create that future and another one to handle the loaded file: function TForm90.CreateXlsFuture: IFuture<TsmXLSFile>; begin { starts loading } Result := TTask.Future<TsmXLSFile>( function: TsmXLSFile begin result := ...


3

Left and right recursion will not produce identical trees. You can see easily from the grammars that A+B+C will at the "top-level' have <term> <op> <exp> or <exp> <op> <term> ("exp" being "B+C" in one case and "A+B" in the other. The trees will only be identical in trivial cases where all productions yield a direct ...


2

Since both grammars are different I would expect different parse trees. The right recursion would swap the addition and the single expansion on the node at the top that is labeled <expr> = <expr> + <term>. The right recursion grammar would expand to <expr> = <term> + <expr> so both children would be swapped. If you are ...


2

When you're writing a proxy iterator, the reference type should be a class type, precisely because it can outlive the iterator it is derived from. So, for a proxy iterator, when instantiating the std::iterator base should specify the Reference template parameter as a class type, typically the same as the value type: class per_class_iterator : public std::...


1

If the vector is sorted by cost then you can iterate over only the items whose cost is lower then the cost limit. If the cost is x. find the first item iterator which is equal or larger than x. you can use std::lower_bound. then you use your parallel_for_each from the beginning of the vector to the iterator you found. combinable<float> localMaxValue([...


1

No, you can't do that. You would do it more like this: ... // this must be a persistant object ismXLSFile : IFuture< TsmXLSFile >; ... // Get started ismXLSFile := TTask.Future< TsmXLFile > (function : TsmXLFile begin Result := TsmXLFile.Create ); end; ); ismXLSFile.Start; // Then at some later point xls := ismXLSFile.Value; And yes, you ...


1

Just loaded sum using unaligned load auto &sum = sum_combine.local(); #if !defined(_M_X64) if (((unsigned long)&sum & 15) != 0) { // just for breakpoint means, sum is unaligned. int a = 5; } auto sum_temp = _mm_loadu_si128(&sum); sum = _mm_add_epi32(temp, sum_temp); #else sum = _mm_add_epi32(temp, sum); #endif


1

You are correct that if you define your EuclideanDistance object outside the parallel_for_each lambda body, it will be shared across all the worker threads executing the parallel_for_each. This would be a problem if your Match() function had side effects affecting shared state in your EuclideanDistance object but in that case it is likely defining the object ...


1

As far I understand, the asynchronous task library then handles those incoming requests in a parallel way -- meaning that not the main thread handles all tasks in an event-like fashion, but rather the library assigns the tasks to an underlying thread pool in some (--to me intransparent--) way. Did I get that correct? Yes, in the REST SDK, they use ...



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