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158

#pragma mark directives show up in XCode in the menus for direct access to methods. They have no impact on the program at all. For example, using it with XCode4 will make those items appear directly in the Jump Bar. There is a special pragma mark - which creates a line.


51

It appears this can be done. I'm unable to determine the version of GCC that it was added, but it was sometime before June 2010. Here's an example: #pragma GCC diagnostic error "-Wuninitialized" foo(a); /* error is given for this one */ #pragma GCC diagnostic push #pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wuninitialized" foo(b); /* no ...


49

If you're using c99 or c++0x there is the pragma operator, used as _Pragma("argument") which is equivalent to #pragma argument except it can be used in macros (see section 6.10.9 of the c99 standard, or 16.9 of the c++0x final committee draft) For example, #define STRINGIFY(a) #a #define DEFINE_DELETE_OBJECT(type) \ void ...


43

According to a US Government-owned(!) document describing the design of Ada: Rationale for the Design of the Ada® Programming Language : A pragma (from the Greek word meaning action) is used to direct the actions of the compiler in particular ways, but has no effect on the semantics of a program (in general). I like the (last caveat) there... ...


42

I believe you can compile with -Wno-unknown-pragmas to suppress these.


36

There is no "Correct" way, it is annotation, so how you use it is a coding style issue. Having said that, I do: #pragma mark - #pragma mark Actions Because that causes the popup menu in the Xcode editor group the title and the methods inside of the same divider.


33

base tried to do one too many things - automatically handling loading modules but also allowing establishing inheritance from classes already loaded (possibly from a file whose name wasn't based on the module name). To sort of make it work, there was some hackery that caused surprising results in some cases. Rather than break backwards compatibility, a ...


31

According to the standard, Pragma is implementation dependent (section 14.32), except for no-cache because of its wide use. Cache-Control (section 14.9) is the proper way to control caching. This is what the standard says for a Cache-Control: public: Indicates that the response MAY be cached by any cache, even if it would normally be non-cacheable or ...


30

Using the switch will enable all warnings in all modules used by your program. Using the pragma you enable it only in that specific module (or script). Ideally, you use warnings in all your modules, but often that's not the case. Using the switch can get you a lot of warnings when you use a third party module that isn't warnings-safe. So, ideally it doesn't ...


30

#pragma mark is used to tag the group of methods so you may easily find and detect methods from the Jump Bar. It may help you when your code files reach about 1000 lines and you want to find methods quickly through the category from Jump box. In a long program it becomes difficult to remember and find a method name. So pragma mark allows you to categorize ...


27

Armed with the extra bit of information from ysth, I was able to see the differences in the docs: The base pragma does the following things: adds the named package to @ISA loads the module with the same name as the named package using require (unless it detects that the package has already been loaded) won't fail if a module with the same name as the ...


27

You can push/pop a low level of warning, like this: #pragma warning(push, 0) #include <boost/bind.hpp> #include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp> // ... #pragma warning(pop) But know that it's not possible to disable all warnings. For example, some linker warnings are impossible to turn off.


25

A directive like #pragma once is not trivial to define in a fully portable way that has clear an unambiguous benefits. Some of the concepts for which it raises questions are not well defined on all systems that support C, and defining it in a simple way might provide no benefit over conventional include guards. When the compile encounters #pragma once, how ...


22

'#pragma' is for compiler directives that are machine-specific or operating-system-specific, i.e. it tells the compiler to do something, set some option, take some action, override some default, etc. that may or may not apply to all machines and operating systems. see msdn for more info


22

MSDN has a list of warning codes. Unfortunately, you have to click each link to view what the code actually means.


21

If you do not restore the disabling is active for the remainder of the file. Interestingly this behaviour is not defined in the language specification. (see section 9.5.8) However the 9.5.1 section on Conditional compilation symbols does indicate this "until end of file behaviour" The symbol remains defined until a #undef directive for that same ...


21

Yes it is a Bug here. But you can override this bug to your requirement by just adding {} in your interface .h file/ as well as in implementation / .m file : @implementation AppDelegate {} #pragma mark - #pragma mark Category 1 -(void)awakeFromNib{ } Also, no need to use two #pragma, you can combine both of them into one as : #pragma mark - ...


19

#pragma is used to do something implementation specific in C, i.e. be pragmatic for the currrent context rather than idealogically dogmatic. The one I regularly use is #pragma pack(1) where I'm trying to squeeze more out of my memory space on embedded solutions, with arrays of structures that would otherwise end up with 8 byte alignment. Pity we don't have ...


18

It is apparenly related to the coverage.py: Coverage.py is a tool for measuring code coverage of Python programs. It monitors your program, noting which parts of the code have been executed, then analyzes the source to identify code that could have been executed but was not. That exact # pragma: no cover is the hint that the part of code should be ...


18

Like when to use SPECIALIZE pragma and what performance gains it has. You let the compiler specialise a function if you have a (type class) polymorphic function, and expect it to be called often at one or a few instances of the class(es). The specialisation removes the dictionary lookup where it is used, and often enables further optimisation, the ...


18

I'm also experiencing this problem. A pragma mark added before the first method will not show up. For example, this will not work: @implementation RandomClass #pragma mark - Getter Methods - (void) firstMethod { } @end Here are some quick-dirty workarounds to make the pragma mark before the first method show up. You can add an empty block before it or ...


18

GCC gives you a few different ways of handling this: Use #pragma directives, like #pragma GCC optimize ("string"...), as seen in the GCC docs. Note that the pragma makes the optimizations global for the remaining functions. If you used #pragma push_options and pop_options macros cleverly, you could probably define this around just one function like so: ...


17

The -w command-line switch turns on warnings globally for the entire interpreter. On the other hand, use warnings is a "lexical pragma" and only applies in the lexical scope in which it's used. Usually, you put that at the top of a file so it applies to the whole file, but you can also scope it to particular blocks. In addition, you can use no warnings to ...


17

I googled and got this: #pragma GCC system_header This pragma takes no arguments. It causes the rest of the code in the current file to be treated as if it came from a system header. Section 2.7 System Headers. More info on System headers 2.7. System Headers The header files declaring interfaces to the operating system and runtime ...


17

I figured it out with the inspiration from newtover, digging into FMDB and re-reading the sqlite3 documentation (it is still very vague in my opinion). This code returns the value that I bumped in the admin tool when I make notable changes to the schema that require migration. -(int)queryUserVersion: (sqlite3*) db { // get current database version of ...


16

In mathematics and logic, a pragma is a given, a fact, a prerequisite to the argument, problem, or proof which follows.


15

You shouldn't need a list. The compiler will tell you. If you get a compiler error that says "warning CS0168", then add 168 to the list (or, better yet, fix the code).


15

There is no standard way of doing this. The standard states that padding may be done at the discretion of the implementation. From C99 6.7.2.1 Structure and union specifiers, paragraph 12: Each non-bit-field member of a structure or union object is aligned in an implementation-defined manner appropriate to its type. Having said that, there's a couple ...


15

#pragma warning( push ) #pragma warning( disable : 4101) // Your function #pragma warning( pop )


15

Xcode uses the gcc and clang compilers which both use __attribute__((packed)) to designate struct packing. struct foo { uint8_t bar; uint8_t baz; } __attribute__((packed)); Using __attribute__((aligned(1))) tells the compiler to begin each struct element on the next byte boundary but doesn't tell it how much space it can put at the end. This means ...



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