Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

If you only want to suppress a warning in a single line of code, you can use the suppress warning specifier: #pragma warning(suppress: 4101) // here goes your single line of code where the warning occurs For a single line of code, this works the same as writing the following: #pragma warning(push) #pragma warning(disable: 4101) // here goes your code ...


1

As your table shows it is very rare now to encounter a compiler in mainstream use that does not support #pragma once. To keep a code base clean and cheap to maintain requires a constant effort of refactoring. Having to update include guards each time you rename a class or move some code around adds a significant burden to this effort. So I would say apart ...


0

In certain situations you must have a named parameter but you don't use it directly. For example, I ran into it on VS2010, when 'e' is used only inside a decltype statement, the compiler complains but you must have the named varible e. All the above non-#pragma suggestions all boil down to just adding a single statement: bool f(int e) { // code not ...


2

I'm not an expert on Ada distributed programming, but here's what I do know (or think I know): The Annotated Ada Reference Manual, Section E.2.3 says, "The restrictions governing a remote call interface library unit are intended to ensure that the values of the actual parameters in a remote call can be meaningfully sent between two active partitions." For ...



Top 50 recent answers are included