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In both C and C++, the result of x++ is an rvalue, so you can't assign to it. In C, ++x is equivalent to x += 1 (C standard §6.5.3.1/p2; all C standard cites are to WG14 N1570). In C++, ++x is equivalent to x += 1 if x is not a bool (C++ standard §5.3.2 [expr.pre.incr]/p1; all C++ standard cites are to WG21 N3936). In C, the result of an assignment ...


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In C the result of pre and post increment are rvalues and we can not assign to an rvalue, we need an lvalue(also see: Understanding lvalues and rvalues in C and C++) . We can see by going to the draft C11 standard section 6.5.2.4 Postfix increment and decrement operators which says (emphasis mine going forward): The result of the postfix ++ operator is ...


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Here is what is happening: --i makes i = 3. You are then doing 3 + i++ As i is now 3, and you have ++ after the i, it's 3 + 3, then after this line i will become 4. So you are printing 3+3, which is 6 and then changing i to become 4 (after). Either way,.. why on earth you would ever do this I don't know, it's horrible to read. However, for learning, ...


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A pre(in|de)crement happens before the command, by definition. A post(in|de)crement happens after the command, by definition. So your command is equivalent to: int i=4; i -= 1; System.out.println(i+i); i += 1; Precedence comes into play when parentheses could change the meaning of things. Since (2*3)+4 != 2*(3+4), we need precedence to evaluate 2*3+4. ...


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You said POSIX shells which would include BASH, Kornshell, Ash, Zsh, and Dash. Fortunately, all of these shells do pattern filtering on variable values. Patterns are what you use when you specify files with things like * on the Unix/Linux command line: $ ls *.sh # Lists all files with a `.sh` suffix These POSIX shells use four different pattern ...


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This is too long for a comment. Instead of using table prefixes, put the tables in separate databases. That is, work with the database, using its build-in mechanisms. MySQL makes it easy to grant access to all tables in a database. This has the additional advantage that as new tables are added into each database, the permissions just work. You don't ...



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