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4

This is a horrible hack, but seems to work for your example for GCC and C11 at least: #include <assert.h> #include <string.h> ... #define STRINGIFY(x) STRINGIFY_(x) #define STRINGIFY_(x) #x #define ASSERT_SAME(m1, m2) \ static_assert(strcmp(STRINGIFY(m1(xxx)), STRINGIFY(m2(xxx))) == 0, \ ...


3

It is not really required in your example, but the use of parenthesis in defines is a useful approach to make sure your define states exactly what you mean in the context of the define and protects it from side effects when used in code. E.g #define VAR1 40 #define VAR2 20 #define SAVETYPING1 VAR1-VAR2 #define SAVETYPING2 (VAR1-VAR2) Then in your code ...


2

It's pretty complicated to explain, but I'll give it a try. Explaination The compiler, for example gcc, gets the input files provided, includes (literally just copy-pastes) the header files into their respective places (where the #include directive is located) in the *.c file, then compiles the file to the object (*.o) file. No executable is created. Here ...


2

The steps: You may need to change to the directory from where your build system invokes the command if the command does not use absolute paths. Copy the compiler command line from your make/cmake/etc. output. Add -E switch. Add/change -o parameter to <source>.i.


1

#define SOME_VALUE 1234 It is preprocessor directive. It means, that before your code is compiled, all occurrences of SOME_VALUE will be replaced by 1234. Alternative to this would be const int kSomeValue = 1234; For discussion about advantages of one or the other see #define vs const in Objective-C As for brackets - in more complex cases they are ...


1

You keep reusing the original file for substitutions, so only the last one actually sticks (the result of all substitutions but the last is overwritten by the next). After sed "s/$$key/$$val/g" $$f > $$f.out;\ put cp "$$f.out" "$$f";\ to fix this. (Or make a working copy of $$f, if you want $$f unchanged, e.g., cp "$$f" ...



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