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64

The text replacement is done where the macro is used, not where you wrote the #define. At the point you use FOO, it replaces FOO with NUM and NUM is currently defined to be 20.


55

In the interests of collecting all the relevant specifications from the standards, I extracted this information from a comment thread, and added C++ section numbers, based on draft N4527 (the normative text is identical in the two standards). The standard(s) are absolutely clear on the subject. #define preprocessor directives do not undergo macro ...


30

GCC and clang are right, VC++ is wrong. 2.2 Phases of translation [lex.phases]: [...] The source file is decomposed into preprocessing tokens (2.5) and sequences of white-space characters (including comments). Preprocessing directives are executed, [...] And 2.5 Preprocessing tokens [lex.pptoken] lists string-literals amongst the ...


24

To do this for a specific target, you can do the following: target_compile_definitions(my_target PRIVATE FOO=1 BAR=1) You should do this if you have more than one target that you're building and you don't want them all to use the same flags.


23

I believe the latter can have appeared due to cargo-culting, i.e. the rule/reflex to always put preprocessor definitions in parentheses for good measure.


22

There is no difference. The only operators with higher priority are ::, ++ and -- and they are not applicable on 0 nor (0). The only funny difference I see is obfuscation : #define NULL (0) void f(int x) { // Do something with x } int main() { f NULL; // This code compiles return 0; }


20

In: FOO the preprocessor will replace it with NUM, then it will replace NUM with what it is currently defined as, which is 20. Those initial four lines are equivalent to: #define FOO NUM #define NUM 20


18

A "header file" is actually inserted by the pre-processor before compilation starts. Just think of it as just "replacing" its #include directive. The guard ... #ifndef MY_HEADER_H #define MY_HEADER_H .... #endif ... is executed after the replacement. So, the header may actually be included multiple times, but the "guarded" part of the text is only ...


16

This is the process: source header source header header \ / \ | / / \ / \ | / / PREPROCESSOR PREPROCESSOR | | V V preprocessed code preprocessed code | | COMPILER ...


14

The C11 standard says (and other versions of C, and C++, say similarly): A preprocessing directive of the form # define identifier replacement-list new-line defines an object-like macro that causes each subsequent instance of the macro name to be replaced by the replacement list of preprocessing tokens that constitute the remainder of the directive. The ...


12

As of watchOS 2.0, you can run native code on the watch, so this is a more relevant question. I'm using the first early beta of watchOS 2, so this may change, but right now, TARGET_OS_WATCH is set to 1 on watchOS. (Also, be careful: TARGET_OS_IPHONE is also set to 1 on watchOS, though TARGET_OS_IOS is 0.)


12

You have to pass the arguments through an additional macro. #define LED_RED E, (1<<6) #define SetPin2(port, mask) PORT ## port ## SET = (mask) #define SetPin(x) SetPin2(x) SetPin(LED_RED); This is due to the order of macro replacement: First, the arguments of a function-like are identified. This already fails if the number of arguments is ...


12

Yes, it's possible, but it's not all that pretty. Here's an example; change NAME and it will print the correct thing. You just need to define TEST_FOR_Name ahead of time for each name, giving each a unique value. #define TEST_FOR_Joe 1 #define TEST_FOR_Ben 2 #define DO_TEST(NAME1, NAME2) DO_TEST_impl(NAME1, NAME2) #define DO_TEST_impl(NAME1, NAME2) ...


12

String literal concatenation happens two translation phases after #include-directives are resolved; your approach cannot work. Instead, try something along the lines of #define STRINGIZE_(a) #a #define STRINGIZE(a) STRINGIZE_(a) #define MYFILE stdio #include STRINGIZE(MYFILE.h) int main() { printf("asdf"); } Demo.


11

Expanding __func__ at preprocessing time requires the preprocessor to know which function it's processing. The preprocessor generally doesn't know that, because parsing happens after the preprocessor is already done. Some implementations combine the preprocessing and the parsing, and in those implementations, it would have been possible for __func__ to work ...


11

If you are performing a build where the DEBUG symbol is defined, then the compiler is performing its static analysis of your code assuming that first return is in effect and not excluded. So your code would be seen as: return thisVariable; return thatVariable; In that context it is clear the second return statement won't be reached in such a build. When ...


11

The reason is that when you don't pass any additional arguments to the macro, __VA_ARGS__ expands to nothing. You therefore end up with the following code like this after macro expansion: debug_logger::debug("SomeFile", "SomeFunction", 42, L"TheFormatString", , 0) If the code you've posted faithfully captures your real scenario, the way out is easy: ...


11

No, it's not a bug. The c preprocessor is a different beast from the rest of the language and it plays by its own rules. Changing this would break compatibility in a massive way, CPP is highly rigorously standardized. The usual way to work around these comma issues is, typedef baz<20,30> baz2030_type; FOO(baz2030_type);


11

For the evaluation in #if, the preprocessor replaces all identifiers that are already defined macros by their appropriate expansion. All identifiers that remain after that have the value 0.


9

struct B{}; defines a nested class, then struct B; is a re-declaration of the same nested class. GCC is wrong to accept the code (bug report), because the standard says in [class.mem]: A member shall not be declared twice in the member-specification, except that a nested class or member class template can be declared and then later defined, In your ...


9

You don't actually want concatenation here. You are just pasting a preprocessing "token" into place, so just use: #define GetBlack(colorName) (color.colorName) The macro argument name colorName is expanded in place. Then int d = GetBlack(black); will expand into int d = color.black; Concatenation is for merging two "tokens" together into one, see ...


8

It replaces for with for(int z=0;z<2;++z)for. Obviously, that would turn for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i) { // ... } into for (int z=0;z<2;++z) for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i) { // ... } Thus creating two nested loops. Without that extra for it would be for (int z=0;z<2;++z) (int i = 0; i < N; ++i) { // ... } Which is obviously ...


8

You can do this with a (GCC specific) diagnostic pragma If you surround the include with the following it will disable any warnings caused by #warning. #pragma GCC diagnostic push #pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wcpp" #include "header.h" #pragma GCC diagnostic pop Note that if you change the ignored to warning in the above the compiler still prints the ...


8

This is not legal in both C and C++. Quotes from draft C standard N1570: 6.10.3 Macro replacement Constraints 1 Tw o replacement lists are identical if and only if the preprocessing tokens in both have the same number, ordering, spelling, and white-space separation, where all white-space separations are considered identical. 2 An ...


7

The C++ language does not provide an automated way to deal with preprocessor macro save and restore. Preprocessor macros (that are not defined from the compiler or the complier command line) work on a file global level, and there is no notion of restricting the scope of a macro to a particular header that is being #included. The way I would deal with such ...


7

If we're talking about safety, one could argue that #define NULL 0 is actually safer than #define NULL (0). You see, the latter enables you to do something like this: a = func NULL; instead of a = func(0); which can create an uncontrolled nuclear reaction in the brain of anyone who sees that in production C code. That is quite un-safe, you know =)


7

The C preprocessor operates on "tokens" and whenever there's a possibility of changing the meaning or ambiguity, it always adds whitespace in order to preserve the meaning. Consider your example, (B) there's no ambiguity or meaning altering whether there's a space between ( and ) added or not irrespective of the macro value of B. But it's not the case ...


7

There are no preprocessor macros in Swift, but you can define a global function taking the iteration count and a closure as arguments: func forCount(count : Int, @noescape block : () -> ()) { for _ in 0 ..< count { block() } } With the "trailing closure syntax", it looks like a built-in control statement: forCount(40) { ...


7

An architecture-independent way to detect 32-bit and 64-bit builds in C and C++ looks like this: // C #include <stdint.h> // C++ #include <cstdint> #if INTPTR_MAX == INT64_MAX // 64-bit #elif INTPTR_MAX == INT32_MAX // 32-bit #else #error Unknown pointer size or missing size macros! #endif


7

The problem is that in the preprocessor, the ## takes place before __LINE__ is expanded. If you add another layer of indirection, you can get the desired result. For technical reasons you actually need two macros (sometimes if you use this in an existing macro you don't need the second one, it seems...): #define TOKEN_PASTE(x, y) x##y #define CAT(x,y) ...



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