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69

While a preprocessor macro is being expanded, that macro's name is not expanded. So all three of your symbols are defined as themselves: ONE -> TWO -> THREE -> ONE (not expanded because expansion of ONE is in progress) TWO -> THREE -> ONE -> TWO ( " TWO " ) THREE -> ONE -> TWO -> THREE ( ...


28

A preprocessor changes the C/C++ code before it gets compiled (hence pre processor). Preprocessor ifs are evaluated at compile-time. C/C++ ifs are evaluated at run-time. You can do things that can't be done at run-time. Adjust code for different platforms or different compilers: #ifdef __unix__ /* __unix__ is usually defined by compilers targeting ...


18

Your question is answered by publication ISO/IEC 9899:TC2 section 6.10.3.4 "Rescanning and further replacement", paragraph 2, which I quote here for your convenience; in the future, please consider reading the specificaftion when you have a question about the specification. If the name of the macro being replaced is found during this scan of the ...


17

Just to keep this question up-to-date: Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 has native support for both SCSS(SASS) and LESS preprocessors. Heres a link to the blog: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/webdev/archive/2014/02/25/announcing-new-web-features-in-visual-studio-2013-update-2-ctp2.aspx We added LESS in VS2013 RTM, and we now have a SASS project item and editor. ...


16

You already know about the #undef option, which would do what you need. There is another option however. You could completely hide the fact that your A uses library C from your users: Define your own types and interface in the header and class definition of A and remove the library include from your A header. Then in your implementation file you can include ...


13

To add on to netcoder's answer, you CAN in fact do this with a 0-argument macro, with the help of the GCC ##__VA_ARGS__ extension: #define GET_MACRO(_0, _1, _2, NAME, ...) NAME #define FOO(...) GET_MACRO(_0, ##__VA_ARGS__, FOO2, FOO1, FOO0)(__VA_ARGS__)


13

assert is a preprocessor macro. Preprocessor macros are dumb; they don't understand templates. The preprocessor sees 10 tokens within the parentheses: assert( std :: is_same < int , int > :: value ); It splits at the comma. It doesn't know that this is the wrong place to split at, because it doesn't understand that std::is_same<int and ...


12

2.5.2 Pre-processing expressions Evaluation of a pre-processing expression always yields a boolean value. The rules of evaluation for a pre-processing expression are the same as those for a constant expression (§7.19), except that the only user-defined entities that can be referenced are conditional compilation symbols 7.19 Constant ...


11

I haven't used Chripy but there are a couple of other options you can try too. My favorite extension for working with Sass in Visual Studio is Mindscape's Web Workbench. It's well integrated, works with Visual Studio 2013 and it even supports Compass. If you use Less or CoffeeScript it will take care of those as well. I've chatted with one of the ...


11

The comma is being treated as a argument separator for the macro, but parenthesis in your second case protect the arguments. We can see this by going to the draft C++ standard section 16.3 Macro replacement which says (emphasis mine): The sequence of preprocessing tokens bounded by the outside-most matching parentheses forms the list of arguments for ...


10

This is standard behavior, adjacent string literals are concatenated together if we look at the C99 draft standard section 5.1.1.2 Translation phases paragraph 6 says: Adjacent string literal tokens are concatenated gcc does have many non-standard extensions, but if you build using -pedantic then gcc should warn you if it is doing something ...


10

The macro isn't really expanding "correctly", because this isn't a valid C Preprocessor program. As Kerrek says, the preprocessor doesn't quite work on arbitrary character sequences - it works on whole tokens. Tokens are punctuation characters, identifiers, numbers, strings, etc. of the same form (more or less) as the ones that form valid C code. Those ...


10

Preprocessor is just doing simple "find & replace", so this code: printf("%d",d*d); changes to printf("%d",10+10*10+10); which is 10+100+10 = 120 That's why it's so important to add parens in defines: #define d (10+10)


10

If that function foo does not make a copy of the string then its interface is sub-optimal. It is better to change it to accept char const* or string_view, so that the caller is not required to construct std::string. Or add overloads: void foo(char const* str, size_t str_len); // Does real work. inline void foo(std::string const& s) { foo(s.data(), ...


9

This is not a good idea: While possible in principle, using the preprocessor means you have to manually unroll the loop at least once, you end up with some arbitrary implementation-defined limit on loop depth and all statements will be generated in a single line. Better use the scripting language of your choice to generate the code (possibly in a separate ...


9

Late answer - I found the other answers useful - and wanted to add a bit extra. How do I dump preprocessor macros coming from a particular header file? echo "#include <sys/socket.h>" | gcc -E -dM - In particular, I wanted to see what SOMAXCONN was defined to on my system. I know I could just open up the standard header file, but sometimes I have ...


9

The comment in the code will be replaced to a white space by the compiler. So in/*hello*/t k; will become in t k; which is not correct. C11 §5.1.1.2 Translation phases 3 The source file is decomposed into preprocessing tokens and sequences of white-space characters (including comments). A source file shall not end in a partial preprocessing ...


9

Here are a few scenarios where using #define is a good solution: Adding diagnostics information while preserving function signature: #ifdef _DEBUG #define Log(MSG) Log((MSG), __FILE__, __LINE__); #endif Conditional compilation and include guards are also a good example (no example given, as you should understand this :)). Boilerplate code is another ...


9

If you compile your project and there are no changes and the DCU is available on the path for the last non debug build then it will be used, causing this problem. Also make sure this unit is included in the uses clause of the DPR. If you build the project it will force a recompile of all units added to the project. I generally compile for syntax but ...


9

https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/Self-Referential-Macros.html#Self-Referential-Macros answers the question about self referential macros. The crux of the answer is that when the pre-processor finds self referential macros, it doesn't expand them at all. I suspect, the same logic is used to prevent expansion of circularly defined macros. Otherwise, the ...


9

For anyone else looking for an answer to this, I'm posting to save you time as some of the answers are a little out of date. Whilst working on a small web project in Visual Studio 2013, I wanted to use SASS for the first time. I did some digging and discovered VS 2013 Update 2 was released with native support for SASS (.scss) files. After a bit more ...


9

You could create a "wrap_c_library.h" which is something like: #ifndef WRAP_C_LIBRARY_H #define WRAP_C_LIBRARY_H #include "c_library.h" #undef TROUBLESOME_MACRO_FROM_C_LIBRARY #endif // WRAP_C_LIBRARY_H


8

In your Build Settings for your test target, try setting "Enable Modules" to NO. I've been having various kinds of trouble with test targets, all around preprocessor expansion. Doing this fixed things for me.


8

Just make a function template: template<typename T> void printLn(T const & v, std::ostream & os = std::cout) { os << v << std::endl; } If you wanna get fancy with it and allow multiple arguments, and C++11 is available to you: void printLn(std::ostream & os) { os << std::endl; } template<typename T, ...


8

Very interesting and useful question! I found this solution, which may not be the simplest, but works for me: #define LOGE(x...) do { \ char buf[512]; \ sprintf(buf, x); \ __android_log_print(ANDROID_LOG_ERROR,"TAG", "%s | %s:%i", buf, __FILE__, __LINE__); \ } while (0) This line: LOGE("Test: %i", 42) logs the following: TAG Test: 42 | ...


8

As I understood you want something like below which is impossible unfortunately: #define IS_DEFINED_MACRO(X) #ifdef(X) 1 #else 0 #endif // IMPOSSIBlE! int x = IS_DEFINED_MACRO(MACRO_TO_TEST); The only possible way is #ifdef MACRO_TO_TEST #define IT_IS_DEFINED 1 #else #define IT_IS_DEFINED 0 #endif


8

The simple setup for debug/release or for crossplatform code. Here is a sample of my program: void Painter::render() { if (m_needsSorting) { _sort(); } for (GameObject* o : m_objects) { o->render(); #ifdef _DEBUG o->renderDebug(); #endif } } and one more for win/ios: #ifdef _WIN32 #include ...


8

INTRODUCTION Since you'd like S<N>::Matrix to yield a different type depending on the N passed, you will need to use some sort of meta template programming. The question is currently tagged with preprocessor, and the snippet explicitly tries to use it; but that is of little to no use in this case. When the code is being preprocessed N is nothing more ...


8

Update: The best answer is already on dlang.org: http://dlang.org/pretod.html . D has no preprocessor. Instead it gives powerful compile-time evaluation and introspection capabilities. Here is a simple list of typical C/C++ to D translations, with links to relevant documents: C/C++: #ifdef, #ifndef, #else, #elif D: version [link] C/C++: #if ...



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