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29

RSA doesn't pick from a list of known primes: it generates a new very large number, then applies an algorithm to find a nearby number that is almost certainly prime. See this useful description of large prime generation): The standard way to generate big prime numbers is to take a preselected random number of the desired length, apply a Fermat test (best ...


28

This turned out to be a bit verbose, but I hope it fully answers your question... A Gaussian integer is a complex number of the form G = a+bi where i2 = -1, and a and b are integers. The Gaussian integers form a unique factorization domain. Some of them act as units (e.g. 1, -1, i, and -i), some as primes (e.g. 1 + i), and the rest composite, that can be ...


17

Compare such an approach to a (pre-generated) sieve. Modulo is expensive, so both approaches essentially do two things: generate potential factors, and perform modulo operations. Either program should reasonably generate a new candidate factor in less cycles than modulo takes, so either program is modulo bound. The given approach filters out a constant ...


14

From one of my favorite books ever, Applied Cryptography by Bruce Schneier "If someone created a database of all primes, won't he be able to use that database to break public-key algorithms? Yes, but he can't do it. If you could store one gigabyte of information on a drive weighing one gram, then a list of just the 512-bit primes ...


14

int a, b; Console.WriteLine("Please enter your integer: "); a = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine()); for (b = 2; a > 1; b++) if (a % b == 0) { int x = 0; while (a % b == 0) { a /= b; x++; } Console.WriteLine("{0} is a prime factor {1} times!", b, x); } ...


12

If you want to factorize many large numbers, then you might be better off first finding the prime numbers up to sqrt(n) (e.g. using Sieve of Eratosthenes). Then you have to check only whether those prime numbers are factors instead of testing all i <= sqrt(n).


11

Because you are telling it a negative number (assuming you are using a 32 bit GHC). where n = 600851475143 -- n = -443946297 notice: Prelude Data.Int> 600851475143 :: Int32 -443946297


11

Haskell usually defaults to Integer when there is a free choice of integral type to use. But here we are seeing Int. And the reason is: elemIndex :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> Maybe Int So x in Just x -> x + 2 is an Int, which means smallFactor has to return an Int, which means n in main has to be an Int because quot :: Integral a => a -> a ...


10

Point-1 You have misspelled largest in function name long largetsprime(long) ^ s is wrong here In declaration It should be long largestprime(long) ^ before t Point-2 You are using sqrt() library function from math.h, you should compile your program with -lm as: gcc -Wall -std=c99 -pedantic primefactors.c -lm Point-3 ...


10

With your solution, there are about 600 billion possible numbers. As noted by delnan, making every check of the number quicker is not going to make much difference, we must limit the number of candidates. Your solution does not seem to be correct either. 59569 = 71 * 839 isn't it? The question only asks for prime factors. Notice that 71 and 839 is in your ...


9

Your prime_factorize function doesn't have a return statement in the recursive case -- you want to invoke "return prime_factorize(x/i,li)" on its last line. Try it with a prime number (so the recursive call isn't needed) to see that it works in that case. Also you probably want to make the signature something like: def prime_factorize(x,li=None): if li ...


9

Take a prime number p. Calculate p^6. Its only divisors will be: 1, p, p^2, p^3, ..., p^6.


9

Here's a tail recursive implementation of the primefactors procedure, it should work without throwing a stack overflow error: (defn primefactors ([n] (primefactors n 2 '())) ([n candidate acc] (cond (<= n 1) (reverse acc) (zero? (rem n candidate)) (recur (/ n candidate) candidate (cons candidate acc)) :else (recur n (inc ...


8

This is a bit of a spoiler, so if you want to solve this yourself, don't read this yet :). I'll try to provide hints in order of succession, so you can read each hint in order, and if you need more hints, move to the next hint, etc. Hint #1: If divisor is a divisor of n, then n / divisor is also a divisor of n. For example, 100 / 2 = 50 with remainder 0, so ...


8

My other answer is rather long and quite different from this one, so here's something else. Rather than just filter out multiples of the first two primes, or encode all relevant primes in one byte each, this program filters out multiples of all of the primes that fit in eight bits, specifically 2 through 211. So instead of passing 33% of numbers, this ...


8

Your main problem is you're checking for enormous primes -- all the way up to 600851475143. You can improve things a lot by observing two things: Every time you find a prime, you can decrease the maximum prime you look at by dividing away that factor. You only have to look for primes until you reach the square root of the target. If your primes are bigger ...


7

Don't try to mod by 0, it's undefined! Doing so will result in a divide-by-zero error. long x = 0; modulus = number % x; // x is 0 here and thus not valid To expand a bit on my answer, per Wikipedia's article on Modulo Operations a modulo 0 is undefined in the majority of systems, although some do define it to be a.


6

I would say, "use xrange() instead", but you are actually using the list of ints as the sieve result..... So an integer generator is not a correct solution. I think it will be difficult to materialize a list with 39312312323123123 elements in it, no matter what function you use to do so.... That is, after all, 279 petabytes of 64-bit integers. Try this. ...


6

If I were to do this using loop and modulos I would do: long number = 98739853; long biggestdiv = number; while(number%2==0) //get rid of even numbers number/=2; long divisor = 3; if(number!=1) while(divisor!=number) { while(number%divisor==0) { number/=divisor; biggestdiv = divisor; } divisor+=2; } In the end, ...


6

Check this question. You have to specify your literal like this: 600851475143LL


6

A number with the factorisation n = product(p_i ^ k_i) will have d = product(k_i + 1) divisors (see divisor function in Wikipedia). This shows n may only have one prime factor, and this prime factor must be raised to the power of 6. So take the sixth power of an arbitrary prime number.


5

Please see SO questions: http://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Astackoverflow.com+prime+number&btnG=Search http://stackoverflow.com/questions/586284/finding-prime-numbers-with-the-sieve-of-eratosthenes-originally-is-there-a-bett http://stackoverflow.com/questions/288200/prime-number-calculation-fun ...


5

This is not something you should be doing at run-time. A better option is to pre-calculate all these primes and then put them in your program somehow (a static array, or a file to be read in). The slow code is then run as part of the development process (which is slow anyway :-), not at the point where you need your speed. Then it's just a matter of a ...


5

Fermat's factorization method is simple and quick for finding pairs of large prime factors as long as you stop it before it goes too far and becomes slow. However, in my tests on random numbers such cases have been too rare to see any improvement. ...without using a probabalistic approach (e.g., Miller-Rabin) for determining primality With uniform ...


5

Your problem is that... well... you can't compare Integral and Floating values :-) You have to explicitly indicate the conversions between integers and floats. The sqrt :: (Floating a) => a -> a function works with floats, but you're dealing primarily in integers, so you don't get to use it for free. Try something like this: pfactors' ps n | p ...


5

I want to provide some additional clarification of what's going on, even though the solution has already been provided. In particular, type classes are NOT types. You can't have an Integral value or a Floating value. Those aren't types, they are type classes. This isn't like object-oriented subtyping. A signature like Integral a => a -> a -> a ...


5

Since you already have a list of the prime factors, what you want to do is to compute the powerset of that list. Now one problem is that you might have duplicates in the list (e.g. the prime factors of 20 = 2 * 2 * 5) and sets don't allow duplicates. So we can make each element of the list unique by projecting it to a structure of the form {x, y} where x ...


5

Uh before you start thinking about concurrent implementations, I'd propose optimizing the algorithm a bit. Apart from 2 every prime is odd, so make 2 a special case and then start at 3 with your loop and increase the factor by 2. Then instead of computing number / factor every loop ending (that also makes optimizing for the JIT harder I think) just compute ...


5

Your second recursive call already is in the tail positions, you can just replace it with recur. (primefactors n (inc candidate)) becomes (recur n (inc candidate)) Any function overload opens an implicit loop block, so you don't need to insert that manually. This should already improve the stack situation somewhat, as this branch will be more commonly ...


5

The typical way is to include an accumulator as one of the function arguments. Add a 3-arity version to your function definition: (defn primefactors ([n] (primefactors n 2 '())) ([n candidate acc] ...) Then modify the (conj ...) form to call (recur ...) and pass (conj acc candidate) as the third argument. Make sure you pass in three arguments to ...



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