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1

When you do 3/2 that won't give you a double result. Integer division happens and result gets truncated to an integer. Hence there is no need of cast. In order to get double result, either needs to be cast to double so that get a compiler error to get it casted to double. Try doing met(3d / 2), then you run into the compiler error which you are expecting.


0

This is what I've done after research: public class AnnotatedDeserializer<T> implements JsonDeserializer<T> { @Override public T deserialize(JsonElement je, Type type, JsonDeserializationContext jdc) throws JsonParseException { List<String> jsonFields = new ArrayList<>(); for(Map.Entry<String,JsonElement> entry : ...


0

I am also facing same, issue. If your using primitive type then its have its default data. For integer 0, boolean false, etc.., its not from the GSON. If you defined any field/variable it will have some default value in the memory. For that I designed the solution, GSON will always looks in the filed's. so what I done is, I defined all are Strings. Strings ...


3

The error is pretty much exactly what the error message says it is. text2var is not a JTextField, it is a string. Try calling getText() on a JTextField, maybe text2?


0

There are no standard macro definitions for sizes of primitive types. In boost/atomic there are macros giving you sizes of primitive types, they are using boost/cstdint.hpp among other sources. Example would look like follow: #include <iostream> #include <boost/atomic.hpp> int main() { std::cout << BOOST_ATOMIC_DETAIL_SIZEOF_LONG; } ...


2

The answer by Telcontar points out the only thing that I can think of to technically make a difference: The second code snippet relies on Autoboxing (or rather auto-unboxing), and thus, requires Java version >= 1.5. Apart from that, there is no technical difference. You mentioned Doesn't this also introduces the risk (on the code impossible, but hey) ...


2

The difference is auto unboxing. The first version, which is better coded as: if (variable.booleanValue()) does not require auto unboxing, so can be used with pre 1.5 versions of Java. The second version, uses auto unboxing, and so requires version 1.5 and above. If you need your code to run on and old Java version, you must use version 1. Both can ...


1

Boolean has three states - true, false and null. If you have in uninitialized then you will get NullPointerException in case of writing !var. Also remember, objects are autoinitialized to null while boolean primitive to false.


2

I suppose that the only advantage of the first method over the second it´s the posibility to compile the code with older JDK's/ Java languaje specification prior to Java 1.5


2

There is no difference between the behaviour of the two snippets. JLS 5.1.8: At run time, unboxing conversion proceeds as follows: If r is a reference of type Boolean, then unboxing conversion converts r into r.booleanValue() So if (variable) {...} will execute as if(variable.booleanValue()) {...} Whether you add == false or a negation is a ...


1

Assuming that it is important to keep the original ordering (thus a single array), and that keeping track of the type is important, and that using a JSON parser is unavailable, I would consider something like the following. enum ValueType { INT, DOUBLE, FLOAT }; static abstract class ParsedValue<T> { private final T data; private final ...


-1

After java Version 1.5 there is a cool feature introduced named autoboxing which enables compiler to Convert a primitive type to a Wrapper Type. So, during compilation both method will be work same. public void display(int... a) { System.out.println("1"); } public void display(Integer... a) { System.out.println("2"); } ...


4

In your first example the display(int) method is invoked in strict invocation context while display(Integer) is invoked in loose invocation context (since auto-boxing is required). Thus the compiler chooses the display(int) method according to JLS. Invocation contexts are explained here JLS 5.3. Invocation Contexts In the second example both methods are ...



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