New answers tagged

0

in Java: the primitive variables are categorized in 8 data types: boolean,byte,short,int,long,float,double and char.Every primitive variable has his own range of space in memory. The references variables,refers to objects(Array,String,ArrayList,StringBuilder,...), and doesnt matter the space of the object referred. Differences: 1.references types can be ...


4

Part of this confusion may be in that, in C#, (mostly) everything inherits from Object. To refer to an Object type in the same way, would refer to every type in the language, and essentially be useless. In C#, the primitive types are Boolean, Byte, Char, Double, Int16, Int32, Int64, IntPtr, SByte, Single, UInt16, UInt32, UInt64, UIntPtr. These types still ...


1

At this state, I can only report my observation, not the exact argumentation as to WHY Java behaves, like it does. First, changing the methods to void doSth(long l) {...} void doSth(Object o) {...} gets rid of the problem, i.e. doSth(2L); will yield the expected result. Going one step further, changing the method parameter to varargs void doSth(long... ...


5

In this case, auto-boxing is causing you grief. Ironically, before that you're correct - the "long" version would have easily been picked. Basically the compiler knows that it can create a Long from your value which, of course, is an Object. So it is still confused as either the long or the Long version could be used. Is one "better" than the other? ...


0

Java always uses at least 32 bit values for calculations. This is due to the 32-bit architecture which was common 1995 when java was introduced. The register size in the CPU was 32 bit and the arithmetic logic unit accepted 2 numbers of the length of a cpu register. So the cpus were optimized for such values. This is the reason why all datatypes which ...


0

Here I've changed my previous answer a bit. Purely based on performance I would say that what might improve it, is just if you pull some variables out before starting the comparison and actally using them in your method. You may not have a reason to create the array in the first place. If you don't need this array at all and you are only using it to make it ...


1

Change the value of the constants to the minimal value: private static final int page_red = 105; and check the following - color[0] >= page_red && color[0] <= page_red + 50 It saves you one substraction per color, and upto 3 per call.


0

You can use Math private boolean isPageColor(double[] color) { return Math.max(page_red - 25,color[0]) == Math.min(color[0], page_red - 25); }


3

This may be code smell in some languages, but it's not usually considered one in Haskell. You have to choose a concrete representation of a name and birth date somewhere, and the datatype declaration of Person is probably the best place to do it. In Haskell, the usual way to keep other code from depending on the name representation would be to make Person ...


2

This would create an array of length 1 which is equivalent to int[] i = new int[]{0}; The last comma will be ignored as specified in JLS §10.6 A trailing comma may appear after the last expression in an array initializer and is ignored.


2

Here new int[] will create an array and initialize with array elements {1}. new int[]{1,}; // Create an array of int of size 1 with value 1 as a first element if you print the length of int[] i. Size will be print 1. because last comma is ignored if no further element found. System.out.println(i.length); // it will print 1 Here i is a reference ...


7

Make Name abstract and provide a smart constructor. This means that you do not export the Name data constructor, and provide a Maybe-returning constructor instead: module Data.Name ( Name -- note: only export type, not data constructor , fromString , toString ) where newtype Name = Name String fromString :: String -> Maybe Name fromString n | null n ...


0

1) You should be getting a validation error when calling: new EmployeeModel(ssn, null, null,null, null) The last parameter is the dayOfBirth, which you have a @NotNull validation check. 2) If you find yourself calling a constructor like this with null parameters, then you likely have an issue, either with the required parameters needed to construct the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included