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0

Sadly there is no way to force streams to use printf's %f behavior. So the only way to handle this is trimming decimal places manually as necessary. I've added a C++ code sample that handles this: string fullfloat( int( log10( numeric_limits< float >::max() ) ) + 5, '\0' ); // Adding 1 for the 10s place, 1 for the '.' 2 for the decimal places, and 1 ...


2

If you just want to print a single " character: putchar('"'); The " doesn't have to be escaped in a character constant, since character constants are delimited by ', not ". (You can still escape it if you like: '\"'.) If it's part of some larger chunk of output in a string literal, you need to escape it so it's not treated as the closing " of the ...


4

You can use escape symbol \" For example puts( "\"This is a sentence in quotes\"" ); or printf( "Here is a quote %c", '\"' ); or printf( "Here is a quote %c", '"' );


0

Oh, I'm sorry! I didn't notice the mistake in my previous answer. Looking at the solution proposed by Pascal Cuoc, I thought another option is to use asprintf() function: it dynamically allocate a string of proper length by itself. Once the string is stored trailing zeros/dot could be cut off: ... float num; ... char *digits; int i=asprintf(&digits, ...


11

If you use * in your format string, it gets a number from the arguments awk '{printf "%*-s%s\n", 17, $1, $2}' file hello this and this awk '{printf "%*-s%s\n", 7, $1, $2}' file hello this and this As read in The GNU Awk User’s Guide #5.5.3 Modifiers for printf Formats: The C library printf’s dynamic width and prec ...


2

does this count? idea is building the "dynamic" fmt, used for printf. kent$ awk '{n=7;fmt="%"n"-s%s\n"; printf fmt, $1, $2}' f hello this and this


2

Using simple string concatenation. Here "%", n and "-s%s\n" concatenates as a single string for the format. Based on the example below, the format string produced is %7-s%s\n. awk -v n=7 '{ printf "%" n "-s%s\n", $1, $2}' file awk '{ n = 7; printf "%" n "-s%s\n", $1, $2}' file Output: hello this and this


0

you can use eval (maybe not the most beautiful with all the escape characters, but it works) i=15 eval "awk '{printf \"%$i-s%s\\n\", \$1, \$2}' a" output: hello this and this


1

With writetable the solution becomes date = {'date1','date2','dateN'}; column2 = [4,7,9]; column3 = [2.4,3.1,6.5]; headers = {'DateHeader','Column2Header','Column3Header'}; T = table(date', column2', column3', 'VariableNames', headers); writetable(T, 'Table.csv');


1

After sprintf('%.3f', tt), use regexprep to remove trailing zeros, if any; remove also the decimal point if all digits after it are zero. That is: regexprep(sprintf('%.3f', tt), '(\.*0+)$', '') Examples: >> tt = 4.1; regexprep(sprintf('%.3f', tt), '(\.*0+)$', '') ans = 4.1 >> tt = 4; regexprep(sprintf('%.3f', tt), '(\.*0+)$', '') ans = 4 ...


0

Try g format specifier instead of f: sprintf('%.4g', tt) See also: How to have sprintf to ignore trailing zeros (Give @RTL is due, I asked the same question a few days ago, this is why I know the answer).


1

I'd suggest making the changes below to see if that's enough of a performance increase for you. I've changed the file permission to W instead of w+. I think that opening the file for write only and without flushing seems to be faster. I've also changed it to a single fprintf call per loop. fid = fopen(filename,'W'); ...


0

It's a dirty solution, but this code behave as you need: ... float num; char decdigits[5]; snprintf(decdigits, 5, "%.2f", num - ((num > 0) ? floor(num) : round(num)) ); if (decdigits[3] == '0') { if (decdigits[2] == '0') decdigits[1] = 0; else decdigits[3] = 0; } printf ("%.0f%s\n", num, decdigits+1); ...


4

The C11 standard says of %f and %F (7.21.6.1:8): A double argument representing a floating-point number is converted to decimal notation in the style [−]ddd.ddd, where the number of digits after the decimal-point character is equal to the precision specification. If the precision is missing, it is taken as 6; if the precision is zero and the # flag is ...


1

I am not aware of any format specifier that will do what you are looking for. Pre-digesting the values before passing them to separate format specifiers might work. For example: Multiply the original floating point number by 100 and round to the nearest integer Assign to nScaled (int). Assign mod(nScaled,100) to another integer, nFractional. Assign ...


1

I'm guessing, and it seems to be confirmed by the the comments to the question, that you don't use all that much of the C library's locale specific functionality. In that case you'd probably be better off not changing the locale to a UTF-8 based one, and leaving it in the single-byte locale your code assumes. When you do need to process UTF-8 strings as ...


1

The safe_printf function by Andrei Alexandrescu is quite clever, but unfortunately has serious limitations: Each argument is processed twice, once to check its validity and the second time to format it with printf. The check can be disabled in release mode to avoid overhead, but this seriously undermines safety. It doesn't work with positional arguments. ...


1

You should use wchar_t type for all variables, objects and functions, this code works: #include <Windows.h> #include <string.h> #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { wchar_t buff[100]; wstring id = L"ST_5"; swprintf_s(buff, 100, L"id: %s", id.c_str()); MessageBoxW(NULL, buff,L"User-id", MB_OK); } The ...


3

You should read the compiler error messages. The second and third arguments to MessageBox have to have the same type. Either you call MessageBoxA with two char *, or you call MessageBoxW with two wchar_t *. One fix for your code would be to do MessageBoxA(NULL, buff, "User-id", MB_OK). You are using sprintf_s incorrectly too, please read its ...


1

For the second argument of MessageBox you use chars, while for the third one you use wchar_ts. This is wrong. If you build not for UNICODE, remove L from L"User-id" so it becomes char array.


1

The newlines are coming from echo 2>&1 that you're running on the remote system. When the ssh is successful, this command executes, and you get a newline printed before the printf. When the ssh fails, the command doesn't run, so you get no newline before the printf. I suggest you use a command that doesn't display anything, and then put \n in both ...


1

You really should only ask 1 question per post so I'll answer your first question - it makes it so other users can find relevant information in the future (not trying to be mean). If you want to start printing on a new line every fifth number you could make use of the modulus operator %. for(int i = 0; i < 50; i++){ if(i % 5 == 0){ // True every ...


1

You don't need to pass the spacing in as part of the data. You can just build the format string on the fly in your printf() statement like so: int n = 5; System.out.printf("%"+n+"d", 12);


0

Use String.format() Build your format string as required and then pass to String.format(). The use of a format string and argument list is identical to its use in printf() String myFormat = "...." // build this string with the format you need String output = String.format( myFormat, ...);


1

Yes . Exists in java System.out.printf("The date is %d/%d/%d", 1,2,1997);


1

Thanks to Robert's answer, I realize that the problem might due to the size of buffer. I use the following codes to find out that by default the size of the printing buffer is 1048576 bytes (1M) size_t sz; cudaDeviceGetLimit(&sz, cudaLimitPrintfFifoSize); std::cout << sz << std::endl; When I increase the buffer size to 100 Mb using the ...


5

Your kernel is taking too long to execute: the launch timed out and was terminated This is a limitation of the windows operating system, when running on WDDM devices. There are a variety of workarounds possible. Some are: reduce your kernel execution time switch the GPU to TCC mode, if possible (not possible with GeForce GPUs). extend the TDR timeout ...


0

To solve the linking errors ('no memory region specified for loadable section .bss etc', i had to add *(COMMON) in the BSS output section.


1

You actually have a syntax error because you are missing SET $sql22 = sprintf("UPDATE `members` SET `fav1`= %s,`fav2`= %s,`fav3`= %s,`fav4`= %s WHERE `username` = %s", $fav1, $fav2, $fav3,$fav4,$jaminona); //^Here Mysql UPDATE syntax UPDATE table SET column=value WHERE colum=?


2

printf returns the number of characters printed. The part you seem to be asking about then boils down to comparing these: printf("%d", (4 + 7)); printf("%d", 4, 7); printf("%d", (4, 7)); In the first one, 4 + 7 gives 11. In the second one, 4 is printed and the excess argument is ignored (because no format specifier corresponds). In the third one , (4, 7) ...


3

When you write: message1() { ... } The function is assumed to return an int. It is usually better to make it explicit: int message1() But your functions do not have any return, so the return value is undefined. In your case, it happens that, by chance, the value stored as return value is the return value of the previous function call, that is ...


1

Your message functions lack a return type. C deduces it to be int. However, not returning a value from a non-void function is Undefined Behaviour. In your case, the return value from printf has probably been stored in a register, which was not overwritten by message before it itself returned. Thus, the return value propagated. While this can seem to ba all ...


0

the functions you declared are implicitly declared as returning int. The compiler should warn you about that, and also tell you that it is deprecated: don't do deprecated stuff. Since you miss a return statement in them the return value is undefined. I guess you get the return value of printf because that's what is in the stack at that moment, in practice, ...


4

I agree with the other answers here; let me just present how you can discover the answer to similar questions by yourself. In C, arguments to functions are passed by value. That is, a function cannot change the value of its argument. This code sprintf(store, /* whatever */); cannot change the value of the pointer store, so it cannot make it point to ...


1

It is stored in the 100 bytes that malloc has provided.


5

sprintf does not allocate memory on its own - it just stores its the input on a previously allocated buffer. In your case, this is indeed the buffer you allocated with the malloc call.


1

string and str are both different pointers pointing to the same thing. Using the array notation is the same as dereferencing so you were actually manipulating the underlying data and because they were pointing to the same thing the change was noted in both places. When you set the pointer equal to the literal, there wasn't any dereferencing or array ...


0

string = "jhony"; this statement has changed the string's value which means the variable string not points to global array any more, it now points to the new const string "johny" which stored in the function's stack


1

This is because string is a local variable. When you set string = jhony you aren't changing str. You are simply changing what string is pointing too. After this there are two string constants defined, "aaaaa" and "jhony", the aaaaa string is not overwritten. Str is also still "aaaaa" since it was not overwritten by the assignment of johnny to string.


2

string = "jhony"; does not copy "jhony" to the memory pointed by string. Instead, it assigns address of "jhony" to string. So after that, string points at "jhony" while str stays unchanged. As @BrianCain commented, to copy "jhonny" to the memory addressed by string you may use strcpy(string, "jhonny");


0

When printing more than DBL_DIG significant decimal digits, the effects of a double finite format may appear. Example: #include <float.h> printf("%d\n", DBL_DIG); printf("%.*e\n", DBL_DIG - 1, 100000000000.0 + 0.00001); printf("%.*e\n", DBL_DIG - 1 + 10, 100000000000.0 + 0.00001); 15 1.00000000000000e+11 1.000000000000000152587891e+11 ...


0

If all you ever do with snprintf() is copying strings (as seems to be the case), i.e. all you ever have is one or more "%s" as format string, why are you not using strcpy(), perhaps with a strlen() first to check the source's length? Note that strncpy(), while looking like a good idea, isn't. It always pads the target buffer with zeroes, and in case the ...


1

Cast to a long double in order to get more precision: snprintf(name1,length+1,"%Lf", (long double)iterMax+k*step); Output: numbers : k = 0 ; k*step = 0.000000 ;strings : k*step = 0.000000 ; iterMax+k*step = 100000000000.000000 numbers : k = 1 ; k*step = 0.000010 ;strings : k*step = 0.000010 ; iterMax+k*step = 100000000000.000010 numbers : k = ...


5

This is actually a problem of double precision. There are plenty of other questions which explain more about IEEE-754 floating-point numbers, but I'll sum up the relevant points here: double and family effectively store numbers in scientific notation with limited precision. This means the larger the number, the less accurate it'll be. Most numbers use base ...


0

Why not just do this? double f = 359.01335; printf("%g", round(f * 1000.0) / 1000.0);


1

Try this reg exp. (?:blue bird|yellow card|day)


1

MATLAB's regex engine doesn't use \b as word boundary anchors but \< and \>. So your regex would become y = regexp(l2, '^(?=.*\<(?:blue bird|day|Yellow card)\>).*', 'lineanchors'); assuming that l2 is a multiline string.


2

Try this >> fprintf('%02i:%02i:%06.3f\n', 6, 5, 7.123); 06:05:07.123


1

As already explained, this is undefined behaviour since you are using the wrong format specifiers. The C standard allows a conforming implementation to do anything whatsoever. It can crash, it can burn, it can print 7. But to actually answer your question, think of the function printf, and what it receives. In both calls, you send it two copies of the ...


0

You declare a variable with INT type but you give assigment of a real number (7.89 and not 7 or 8). You just change THE int foo TO (double) foo, or TO (float) foo ---double can cap more memory space than float, that means more precise numbers---- and then in PRINTF type %lf for double OR %f for float and you should be ok. int main() { float foo = 7.89; ...



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