Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You are printing the result of an assignment (a=a+3) which is the assigned value (3). But the evaluation order of the parameters depends on the compiler (undefined behaviour). it could print: (3,a=3,a+b=5) or: (3,a=0,a+b=2) or even: (3,a=0,a+b=5)


0

I compiled an example using printf("a") with -S and got call putchar in the assembly code. Looks like when you have only one char in the printf the compiler turns it into a putchar(). I did another example using printf("ab") and got call printf, with the text section in the %edi register.


1

It is undefined behaviour, so anything can happen. %d requires an int, but you are passing a double (not a float), so printf takes 4 bytes of the double value and interprets it as an int. %f requires a double, but you are passing an int. So it takes the 4 byte of the int and 4 bytes from the next memory and interprets it as a double. You are lucky to pass ...


2

But I would have expected: … When the format string does not match the types of the arguments in order, the behavior is undefined. Anything can happen. You cannot expect anything (and I do not see why you would expect 0. Maybe you expect printf to use the format string to convert the arguments between floating-point and integer. It just doesn't. It's a ...


1

The only correct expectation is getting 67 for printing a character using %d format specifier*. The other two printouts are undefined behavior. it looks like the printf searches for the corresponding type in the expressions This is only a coincidence. printf has no idea of the types of the actual parameters that you pass. It trusts the format string, ...


2

The problem with with your input file instead of for (int charNum = 0; charNum < corrAns.length(); charNum++) Every time you are checking with corrAns. Check up to ansString. Its hard to change your content having 9 characters if you have more records. use for (int charNum = 0; charNum < ansString.length(); charNum++) {


3

Not sure I fully understand what you're trying to accomplish, but if all your records in exams.dat must have the same length, then the 3rd one from the bottom is missing a character. I'm referring to that record: ABCE CA E All other records are 10 characters long, but that one has only 9 chars. Update: To make it more robust, seems like you need to ...


0

The first thing to learn about gcc is that you need to turn warnings on explicitly and make them errors using -Wall -Wextra -Werror. These are going to warn you about many useful things if you do not do them exactly right. Including the format string and wrong argument types as you have here. I guess the reason why these warning options are not enabled by ...


3

This is undefined behavior. You need to use the correct type specifier. printf cannot verify that the types of parameters that you pass to it for printing match their corresponding format specifiers. The compiler performs type-specific conversions before passing these parameters, so printf expects that for each %f if would find a double (float gets ...


1

Flushing and closing the database file should do the job. fprintf(database, "%f\n", meana); fflush(database); fclose(database);


0

You're making it harder than it needs to be. If you were sending binary data, and the client needed to recognize message boundaries, then yes, you would want to send the message length first, or use some kind of "framing" to delineate the message boundaries. But in this case, you don't need that. You can just write out the message text to the socket, using ...


3

In your code, you need to change printf("EUR%.2d = USD%.2d" euro, dollar); to printf("EUR%.2f = USD%.2f", euro, dollar); Notice two changes Added the ,, as required by the printf() syntax. double should be printed with %f format specifier. Using wrong type of argument invokes undefined behaviour.


2

You're missing a comma. printf("EUR%.2f = USD%.2f" euro, dollar); Should be printf("EUR%.2f = USD%.2f", euro, dollar);


2

The func function is incorrect, as it is returning an invalid pointer: static const char * func() { std::string str = "john"; return str.c_str(); } The string is destroyed at the end of the function, and therefore the pointer str.c_str() is a dangling pointer - pointing to a string that doesn't exist any more. Solution is to ...


1

You are writing directly in a string.c_str(), simply by removing its constness with a const_cast. This is bad and invoke undefined behaviour. So what happens next is simply undefined ... The correct approach for handleVarArgs would be : allocate a bunch of memory from the heap (with malloc or new[]) use vsnprintf to try to write there if the return value ...


0

What is the value of fp after opening a file? How does it relate to the value from before opening a file? The debugger is Your best friend. It should read: FILE *fp = fopen("test.txt","w"); Not mentioning that You should check wether the fopen succeeded.


3

The behaviour of mixed language input or output to the same external unit (~file) is processor dependent - see F2008 15.5.1p6. Amongst other things, this is to accommodate the possibility of buffering (or outright incompatibility) in the runtime support for each language. Because the behaviour is processor dependent there is no guarantee of any particular ...


0

I am not familiar with the putsUSART/putrsUSART routines. Presumably they are part of some implementation-specific library. It could be a character pacing issue. You should check with an oscilloscope to see if the characters are being sent at the same rate (I'm not talking about the baud rate, but possible delays between characters).


2

I was expecting "7888". This happens because you are trying to print LONG with FLOAT identifier. The compiler complains about that if you turn your setting on: program.c:5:5: error: format ‘%f’ expects argument of type ‘double’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’ [-Werror=format=] printf("%f", l); ^ cc1: all warnings being treated as errors ...


6

The %f format specifier expects a double, but you're passing it a long, so that's undefined behavior. If you want to print it properly, you need to either use the %l format specifier to print it as a long: printf("%l", l); Or cast l to double to print it as a floating point number: printf("%.2f", (double)l);


7

%f expects a double and l variable is a long. printf() does not convert it's arguments to a type required by the format specifier all-by-itself magically. FWIW, printf() being a variadic function, default argument promotion rule is applied on the supplied arguments, and it does not change a long to double, either. If at all, you want that conversion to ...


1

You cannot printf a long proberly with a float identifier. What do you want do achieve?


11

%.2f is not a valid format for a long. You can cast it to double: long l = 7888; printf("%.2f", (double)l); Here is a table (scroll a bit down) where you can see which codes are allowed for all number types.


2

You can do something like this: String formatted = String.format("%03d", num); That will lead with however many zeros. For your example, you can use: System.out.printf("%-10s %03d" , word, Integer.parseInt(num)); If num is a float, use Float.parseFloat(num), or better yet declare it as the correct type. See below: public static void main(String[] ...


3

This doesn't really answer the question as GrahamS has already answered it well, but you might want to try using the functions and structs of the TCP/IP stack that were made for this kind of thing: #include <stdio.h> #include <arpa/inet.h> #include <netinet/in.h> int main() { /* * Using functions and structs that were made for this ...


2

You have buf declared as a signed char. You see -1 because 0xFF is 11111111 in binary which is -1 in Two's Complement Declare buf as an unsigned char instead, like this: #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { unsigned char buf[4] = { 0xFF, 0xEE, 0xDD, 0xFF }; char ip[18]; sprintf(ip, "%d.%d.%d.%d", buf[0], buf[1], buf[2], buf[3]); ...


0

You need to pass the address of the strings, not their value. Don't dereference format and LC8. Right now, you're passing in the first 8 characters of the string, not a pointer to the string. Its hard to know for sure without more context, but it looks like the instruction you're getting the segfault on is probably printf dereferencing the format string ...


0

There are different ways of squaring a number. You will find four different ones below: #include <stdio.h> int main() { int p1, p2, p3, p4; int p3s; printf("Enter 4 numbers:"); /* scanf("%d %d %d %d", &p1, &p2, &p3, &p4); p1 = p1 * p1; /* square p1 value */ p2 *= p2; /* square p2 value */ p3s = p3 * p3; /* ...


0

Changed the counter variable to ebx and it works flawlessly.


-1

Easy solution: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use File::Copy 'move'; my @files = <*.txt>; my $count; mkdir "Dir1"; mkdir "Dir2"; my @dir = <Dir*>; for my $files (@files) { ++$count; if ($count >= 1 && $count <= 9) { my $move_files = sprintf '%s/%04d_test.text', $dir[0], $count; move ($files, ...


2

Your question is very odd. Dir2 doesn't appear to have any bearing on the problem, and I don't see how you expect mkdir -p "Dir1" to do anything useful in a Perl program. However, this should solve your problem #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use File::Copy 'move'; use File::Path 'make_path'; my @dirs = ( 'Dir1', 'Dir2' ); make_path $_ for ...


0

One statement generic conversion of any integral type into the binary string representation using standard library: #include <bitset> MyIntegralType num = 10; print("%s\n", std::bitset<sizeof(num) * 8>(num).to_string().insert(0, "0b").c_str() ); // prints "0b1010\n" Or just: std::cout << std::bitset<sizeof(num) * 8>(num);


2

There are some ways you can do this, you can use a temporary buffer to generate the names and then print them: char buf[64]; snprintf(buf, 64, "%s_setup%i", measurementname, counter); sprintf(strtmp, "%i\t%-20s\t% 2.2f\t% 2.2f", measnum, buf, setvalue, measuredvalue); Or you can explore the wonders of variable padding: sprintf(strtmp, "%i\t%s_setup%*i\t% ...


0

There's no simple way to do this via only the format specifier. You could use the * specifier in the string format to specify a dynamic string width, but that's still going to require you to calculate the name string length, as well as the added string + number length.


0

You could split your sprintf's (and, in the meantime, use snprintf instead, for safety), and use the return value of the previous one to know exactly how much characters have been printed. Something like that : // Will split in columns = 10, 50, 60 void formatMyString(int num, char *name, int counter, float setval, float mes) { char buf[256] = {0}; ...


0

How can I combine these without using multiple steps [...] You can't. But you can write a helper function and use that: const char *combineFixedWidth(char *buf, size_t width, const char *str, const char *suff) { size_t len, slen; memset(buf, ' ', width); buf[width] = 0; len = strlen(str); slen = strlen(suff); if (len > ...


0

You can specify second column width when formating to maximum length of the text it'll hold. If necessary bump up that value. printf("%-40s", "Some text"); The - left-justifies your text in that field long 40 charcters, otherwise it would be right. There isn't any nice other way to do this. Same applies for sprintf and fprintf. If you always output to ...


1

The working variant of my script follows: use Win32::Console::ANSI; # for Windows and nothing for linux # ... #---OUTPUT---------------------- if ( !($x % 10) ) { local $| = 1; # Choose the line for thread ($i - thread_id) print "\n" x $i; # Remove prev. progress print "\b" x length($progressString) if defined $progressString; # Do lots of ...


1

Getting terminal control codes right is really difficult (as seen below, not all of them have a well-defined width), so your best bet is probably to use explicit column movement. # string2 defined as above def col(n): return "\033[{:d}G".format(n) print("foo{:s}{:s}bar".format(string2,col(8))) Output: foo12 bar


1

I don't know if it will qualify as "clean" but something in the vain of the following is workable: print("foo{0}{1:4s}{2}bar".format(ANSI_RED, string1, ANSI_DEFAULT))


1

What's a clean way of having ANSI colors and working field widths? Unfortunately, you will have to strip the escape sequences to get a displayed field width. The len() function returns the number of bytes in a Python 2 str type and the number of code points in a Python 3 str type. That length has never been guaranteed to match the display width (which ...


-1

You could use preprocessor directives to detect how a datatype is defined and compile another sprintf() with a different string.


3

Pascal's solution is the most direct and most idiomatic for this particular type, but for the record, an alternative for printing arbitrary integer types whose definitions you don't know is simply casting to intmax_t or uintmax_t then using the j modifier (e.g. %jd or %ju). This might not work on most/all versions of MSVC's standard library implementation, ...


10

The solution is to use C99's format macros, in particular PRIu64 for an uint64_t: #include <inttypes.h> … sprintf(buffer, "%#" PRIu64 "\n", u64key);


1

Just call the method randTest() instead of printing it. The work of printing is already done inside the method. And randTest takes in an argument of the type int. So, you need to save the return of RandInt and then pass it into the method. public static void main(String[] args) { int randInt = RandInt(); System.out.println(randInt); ...


0

Hex: printf("64bit: %llp", 0xffffffffffffffff); Output: 64bit: FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF


2

%e specifier is used to print value of float\double in exponential format. So here %1.4e will print 1 digit before the decimal point and 4 digits after the decimal point. So if bmax=12.242 then the output will be 1.2242e+01.


0

#include <stdio.h> #define NUMBER_OF_BOXES 2 void printBoxes(const int boxes[NUMBER_OF_BOXES]) { char ball = 'o'; for(int i = 0; i < NUMBER_OF_BOXES; i++) { printf("Box %d: ", i+1); for(int j = 0; j < boxes[i]; ++j) { printf("%c", ball); } printf("\n"); } } void printBoard(const int ...


0

#include <stdio.h> #define NUMBER_OF_BOXES 2 void printBoxes(const int boxes[NUMBER_OF_BOXES]) { char ball = 'o'; for(int i = 1; i <= NUMBER_OF_BOXES; i++) { printf("Box %d: ", i); for(int j = 0; j < boxes[i-1]; ++j) { printf("%c", ball); } printf("\n"); } } void ...


0

The main difference of these versions is fin >> x >> y; and scanf("%lf %lf",&x,&y); but not fstream vs printf that called ones from the end of program. The difference is that C++-streams are synchronized with C-streams and this is reduces their speed. If you know, that you'll never mix fstream and FILE* in your program, you can switch ...



Top 50 recent answers are included