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0

%lu for unsigned long %llu for unsigned long long


1

Your problem is that you are storing name and type as chars, not char[]s. You can either allocate memory for them at runtime or declare them as arrays of fixed size. My code will use the latter. Change the struct to something like this: struct File { char type[12]; /*or whatever maximum sizes you think are appropriate */ char name[64]; int ...


4

Your structure contains space for exactly 1 character type and 1 character name. Both of those are likely to be longer than a single character - in fact, they must, since they're presumably supposed to be null-terminated strings. Try making those into arrays instead...


1

I would do: scan(text=" 7.7597 4.7389 3.0058 0.0013") #Read 4 items #[1] 7.7597 4.7389 3.0058 0.0013 It correctly reports NAs: scan(text=" 7.7597 NA 4.7389 3.0058 0.0013") #Read 5 items #[1] 7.7597 NA 4.7389 3.0058 0.0013 It breaks on malformed input (non-numeric). So you can control it with a tryCatch: ...


0

Why not make your method more reliable, instead of searching for something that may not even exist. > x <- " 7.7597 4.7389 3.0058 0.0013" > unlist(read.table(text = x, strip.white = TRUE), use.names = FALSE) # [1] 7.7597 4.7389 3.0058 0.0013 > as.numeric(sapply(strsplit(x, "\\s+"), "[", -1)) # [1] 7.7597 4.7389 3.0058 0.0013 ...


0

Your printf statement is wrong cause use of s%%s instead of %s%s putting output variables in quotes "space","ampmoutput" Change your printf statement to look like System.out.printf("%2d:%2d%s%s %4f", hour,minute,space,ampmoutput,fractionofday);


0

I believe your format string is messed up. Instead of s%%s you should use %s%s Also, your space and ampmoutput should not be in quotes.


0

First string you have s%%s have to be %s%s


0

You should modify the following code file_not_binary.write((char*) &router,sizeof(router)); to file_not_binary.write((char*) &router,strlen(router)); The sizeof(router) is the size of array, but strlen(router) is the length of route[i].route_number. You want to write the route_number(int) to the file, not the array.


0

As of C++11 you can also use raw strings std::printf(R"(\\n)"); everything inside the R"( and )" will be printed literally. escape sequences will not be processed.


3

do you mean this ? sprintf('%.15g', 3.0001001) ==> 3.0001001 sprintf('%.15g', 3.0001) ==> 3.0001


7

Simply use g instead of f: sprintf('%.15g', 3.0001) ans = 3.0001 From doc sprintf %g The more compact form of %e or %f with no trailing zeros The above method fails for numbers lower than 0.0001 (1e-4), in which case an alternative solution is to use %f and then regexprep here it replaces one more more zeros followed by a space with a space: str ...


0

If you add some print statement you have to compile the program again and then run it in order to see the printed text. I think this is obvious for a compiled languages. Instead of print statements use GDB with breakpoints in order to inspect the values of the variables or the flow of the program.


0

First of all, there's no need for the commas of the first print(). Secondly, the format you used in the second printf() is "3%d". It means that the number 3 will be printed before any number, and this is unnecessary. Look at this code as an option to fix your problem (added some alignments and newlines) #include <stdio.h> int main() { int ...


0

The problem is in your printf statements. printf("X+Y X*Y X-Y X/y\n"); printf("%d %d %d %d", a, b, c, d); I think you just want this.


1

You are using %d for decimal which seems superficially correct: $n = sscanf($file, "http://www.example.org/users/uploads/bartmp_%d.jpg"); $refile = sprintf("http://www.example.org/users/uploads/mybar_%d.jpg", $n[0]); The issue is the max numerical value in PHP—and other languages compiled as 32-bit—is 2147483647 so 9404865346 won’t fly. Instead you should ...


4

The %d format specifier only accepts numbers that would fit in an integer (depending on the platform that would be 2^31 or 2^63); without losing precision, in this case, a regular expression may work better: if (preg_match('#^http://www.example.org/users/uploads/bartmp_(\d+)\.jpg$#', $file, $matches)) { $refile = ...


0

Here is how I would do it -- a simple, one-directional loop copying just the characters needed, discarding spaces and inserting a ; where necessary. The space to store a string of length x in (according to strlen) is x+1 -- one extra position for the additional ending zero. The check of when to insert a ; is easy: after initially skipping spaces (if your ...


0

You are not very specific if you want to print via UART or if you want to print via ITM debug channel. For ITM it is pretty simple. Create a file with the following content and make sure SWO trace is enabled on your debug connection: #include <stdio.h> /* Replace next line: Include the device system header file here */ #error "device include file ...


0

Leading zeros (zeros in the left till have a minimum number of digits) don't work for floats. But this will work function formatStringCurrency(tempValue) { // Description return Utilities.formatString("$%d,%02d%1.2f", tempValue/1000, tempValue%1000/10,tempValue%10); } function examples(){ Logger.log(formatStringCurrency(1)); ...


2

Since you do not reply, I will have to guess what your problem is. My guess is that you are seeing something like: Would you like to add foo to group A? [y/n] $ y # nothing happens successful Would you like to add bar to group B? [y/n] This is because print uses buffering when printing. When you print something that does not contain a newline \n it is ...


1

Check the man page for printf(). The first argument is a const char *. You're passing an int. That's what the warning says too: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘printf’ makes pointer from integer without a cast [enabled by default] You wanted: printf("%d", length); You need the format string to specify that an int is going to be printed.


4

Windows just adds a newline before the prompt. Linux does not. (This is a constant annoyance to me. I teach C programming, and my students mostly use Windows. I myself mostly use Linux, and I test run their programming assignments on Linux. Their programs always leave the last line mixed up with my prompt.)


1

Notwithstanding various errors including: using C variable-length arrays of C++ objects within a C++ program file; mixing C (scanf) and C++ input (cin); using the internal header <bits/stdc++.h>, The primary cause of the error is uninitialiased variables: node l,r; // **** here if (u <= m) l = rangeQuery(tree, lc, lml, m, u, ...


0

Here is my suggestion: #include <stdio.h> // None conio.h // Not global variable fp #include <stdlib.h> // To use exit() void handle_error(char* message); int is_a10power(int n); int main(void) // Standard form of main() { FILE *fp1 = fopen("G:\\name.txt","r"); // 1st file open for reading only if (fp1 == NULL) ...


1

This: printf("%d",newNode.val); lacks a terminating newline, so that output will be buffered until the next newline is printed, or fflush(stdout); is called. That might explain what you're seeing.


0

The output is look like this. (1)lo (2)s is (3)exercise (4) Because r+ is opened for read an write only. Let say you are first use (%d) it overwrite the content in the file hel then other content are available lo. Just like instead of 3rd line an\n it overwrite to (3) so content and newline are overwrite ,next line is continued there. Instead of using ...


0

This program would remove the first 4 letters at the beginning of the line to replace it with the line number. Note you are trying to replace the characters and not append at the beginning. Suggest you to copy the string to a temporary buffer, add the line number and then rewrite.


5

AFAIK you basically cannot "insert" bytes in the middle of a file. Instead you will be overwriting bytes in the file. Thus when you use the same file for both reading and writing, you will be "interfering with yourself". I suggest you create a temporary file for the written output, or just write to standard output, allowing you to pipe the output to a ...


1

I. There's no garbage, for two reasons. One is that char p[10] = "Hello"; is equivalent with char p[10] = { 'H', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o', 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 }; i. e. it initializes the non-listed members to zero (more precisely, it initializes them as if they were static). Second, even if they were truly uninitialized, you wouldn't have the right to expect ...


0

Try removing ; after the while and do not increase the a twice...


1

Your code could be shorter if you declared your variables on the same line you read them and you should flush() if you don't println(), that is System.out.print("Enter in pick up time: "); System.out.flush(); String startTime = user_input.next(); System.out.print("Enter in pickup point: "); System.out.flush(); String pickUp = user_input.next(); ...


1

I had a similar problem until I used the function get_posts() rather than creating a new WP_Query. See if that helps...


3

Since the question explicitly asks for an awk solution, here's one which works on all the awks I know of. It's a proof-of-concept; error handling is abysmal. I've tried to indicate places where that could be improved. The key, as has been noted by various commentators, is that awk's printf -- like the C standard function it is based on -- does not interpret ...


1

It's likely that msg, which is a char *, doesn't point to memory that it can use. So you first have to dynamically allocate memory that will be used to store the string. msg = malloc(12); // 12 is an arbitrary value snprintf(msg, 12, "%d", 1); // second parametre is max size of string made by function Alternatively, you can instead declare a static ...


0

How do you declare msg? Something like this should work: char msg[15]; snprintf(msg, sizeof(msg), "%d", 1); Note that the second argument to snprintf is the length of the string, not the size of a character.


2

I had to create another answer to start clean, I believe I've come to a good solution, again with perl: echo '%10s\t:\t%10s\r\n' | perl -lne 's/((?:\\[a-zA-Z\\])+)/qq[qq[$1]]/eeg; printf "$_","hi","hello"' hi : hello That bad boy s/((?:\\[a-zA-Z\\])+)/qq[qq[$1]]/eeg will translate any meta character I can think of, let us take a look ...


2

What you are trying to do is called templating. I would suggest that shell tools are not the best tools for this job. A safe way to go would be to use a templating library such as Template Toolkit for Perl, or Jinja2 for Python.


2

@Ed Morton's answer explains the problem well. A simple workaround is to: pass the format-string file contents via an awk variable, using command substitution, assuming that file is not too large to be read into memory in full. Using GNU awk or mawk: awk -v formats="$(tr '\n' '\3' <fmtStrings)" ' # Initialize: Split the formats into array ...


0

This looks extremely ugly, but it works for this particular problem: s=$0; gsub(/'/, "'\\''", s); gsub(/\\n/, "\\\\\\\\n", s); "printf '%b' '" s "'" | getline s; gsub(/\\\\n/, "\n", s); gsub(/\\n/, "\n", s); printf(s " bar\n", "world"); Replace all single quotes with shell-escaped single quotes ('\''). Replace all escaped newline sequences that appear ...


3

Ed Morton shows the problem clearly (edit: and it's now complete, so just go accept it): awk's string literal processing handled the escapes, and file I/O code isn't a lexical analyzer. It's an easy fix: decide what escapes you want to support, and support them. Here's a one-liner form if you're doing special-purpose work that doesn't need to handle ...


0

That's a cool question, I don't know the answer in awk, but in perl you can use eval : echo '%10s\t:\t%-10s\n' | perl -ne ' chomp; eval "printf (\"$_\", \"hi\", \"hello\")"' hi : hello PS. Be aware of code injection danger when you use eval in any language, no just eval any system call can't be done blindly. Example in Awk: echo ...


4

Why so lengthy and complicated an example? This demonstrates the problem: $ echo "" | awk '{s="a\t%s"; printf s"\n","b"}' a b $ echo "a\t%s" | awk '{s=$0; printf s"\n","b"}' a\tb In the first case, the string "a\t%s" is a string literal and so is interpreted twice - once when the script is read by awk and then again when it is executed, so the \t ...


0

The problem lies in the non-interpretation of the special characters \t and \n by echo: it makes sure that they are understood as as-is strings, and not as tabulations and newlines. This behavior can be controlled by the -e flag you give to echo, without changing your awk script at all: echo -e "hello:\t%s\n\tfoo" | awk '{s=$0; printf(s "bar\n", "world");}' ...


0

All the answers are correct but I am just adding example here. Because I think understanding by example is very easy. In printf() they behave identically so you can use any either %d or %i. But they behave differently in scanf(). For example: int main() { int num,num2; scanf("%d%i",&num,&num2);// reading num using %d and num2 using ...


1

You should use -Wall flag when compiling. I got: ../main.c:6:37: warning: operation on ‘c’ may be undefined [-Wsequence-point] ../main.c:6:37: warning: operation on ‘c’ may be undefined [-Wsequence-point] This code for example is broken: c<<=2 since There are no sequence points between your modifications of c. It should be something like this: ...


3

There are no sequence points between your modifications of c and so the behaviour is undefined. You need to impose sequence explicitly. For example: int main(void) { int c = 5; int d = c >> 2; int e = d << 2; printf("%d\n%d\n%d", c, e, d); return 0; } You should, as a matter of course, ask your compiler to report ...


1

It's the volatile qualifier that casts it to a bool, try instead: std::cout << const_cast<char*>(test) << "\n";


3

Answer found here by a minimal amount of web searching: Short answer: cout is interpreting the object as a bool due to the volatile qualifier. It's a quirk of overloading for the << operator. Long answer: A volatile pointer can't be converted to a non-volatile pointer without an explicit cast, so neither the char* nor the void* overload can be ...


13

The only suitable overload of operator<< is that for bool, so the array is converted (via a pointer) to bool, giving true since its address is non-null. This outputs as 1 unless you use the std::boolalpha manipulator. It can't use the overload for const char * which would output the string, or that for const void * which would output the pointer ...



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