New answers tagged

6

2 forks - Four processes. Each process has two printfs with hello (one in main and one in doit - hence 8.


0

In my case renaming stdarg.h to fix_starg.h, soved to issue,and of course the header that requires stdarg.h also needs to be edited to: #include . Apparently stdarg.h sitting in out...kernel/obj/include was creating a conflict in bionic. I've noticed this issue with a few header files (particuarily types.h and similar variations). The headers seem to be ...


0

You said, Since the printf() function takes a format specifier in order to recognize the datatype to print (Correct me if i'm wrong) I'm not sure, but I think you may be a little wrong here. When you call printf(f, g); the key thing to understand is that printf has no way of knowing the type of g. When you call printf, it is your job to ensure ...


5

As already stated, the %d specifier specifies that you will be passing a integer as second parameter and you pass a pointer (*char typed) variable instead. So the printf() routine interprets the pointer as an integer and prints it (it's value actually) as so. To correctly output the string, you should use the %s specifier.


7

Because, your code invokes undefined behavior. You're trying to print a string using %d format specifier. You should be using %s format specifier instead. Using wrong type of argument for a particular format (conversion) specifier invokes UB. Quoting C11, chapter §7.21.6.1 [...] If any argument is not the correct type for the corresponding conversion ...


0

I am guessing this is due to compiler optimizations: 1 was evaluated as true, and, because the entire OR expression must have been true, the printf("A") wasn't even evaluated.. The decision to execute the printf("A") function or not is not made during compilation but it is made during execution of the program. So, this rule out your explanation of ...


6

In the expression a || b, b is only evaluated when a is false (similarly in a && b, b is only evaluated if a is true). This is known as short-circuiting and it's not an optimization, it's behavior mandated by the standard. If the compiler did anything else, it'd not be a valid implementation. This allows you to do things like a != NULL && ...


0

Normally you set up an explicit IO pipe to a child when you are expecting it to return output. When you fork and exec the child process, it will inherit the parent's file descriptors. So you want to create a unidirectional pipe for the child's output by calling pipe(2). In the child, you redirect standard output and standard error to the write side of the ...


1

Floating point numbers are not Abstract numbers and cannot always represent values exactly. The answer to this question "floating point calculations in awk" has a good explanation of the problem.


1

A (weaker) alternative to using the macros from <inttypes.h> is to convert/cast the the fixed width type to an equivalent or larger standard type. wprintf(L"%lu\n", 0ul + some_uint32_t_value); // or wprintf(L"%lu\n", (unsigned long) some_uint32_t_value);


1

Even if your compiler does not support concatenation of differently-prefixed literals, you can always widen a narrow one: #define WIDE(X) WIDE2(X) #define WIDE2(X) L##X wprintf(L"%" WIDE(PRIu32), foo); Demo


3

Not sure where the problem is, but here (VS 2015) both wprintf(L"AA %" PRIu32 L" BB", 123); and printf("AA %" PRIu32 " BB", 123); compile correctly and give following output: AA 123 BB


5

If this will work or not actually depends on which standard of C the compiler is using. From this string literal reference Only two narrow or two wide string literals may be concatenated. (until C99) and If one literal is unprefixed, the resulting string literal has the width/encoding specified by the prefixed literal. If the two string ...


2

You can use this: fun = arrayfun( @(x,y) ['(' num2str(x) ',' num2str(y) ')'], a, b, 'UniformOutput',false) The result is: fun = '(1,0)' '(1,0)' '(1,0)' '(1,0)' Is it OK for you? P.S. It is really interesting what for you need this? Because there a lot of ways to compare two matrices avoiding this display.


0

This should have been a comment but due to space restrictions, I had to submit this as an answer. #include<stdio.h> #include<limits.h> #include<malloc.h> struct ec { char *c; }; int main(void) { printf("INTMAX : %d\n",INT_MAX); struct ec obj; size_t max=(size_t)INT_MAX+1000; size_t i; ...


1

printf is stated to return number of characters printed or -1 in case or an error. Its return type is int. Maximum number you can store is int is INT_MAX. What happens if you try to print more characters? Then printf cannot fulfill its contract: to return number of characters written. Standard does not says what to do when contract is impossible to fulfill, ...


0

"Printf just prints the result". In other words, the number of characters that printf can print depends on the format specifier specified. The standard syntax for printf is, int printf ( const char * format, ... ); here based on "format", the character count limit is set. from you snippet: int y = printf("%2147483647d \n\n", x); because, the value ...


1

Well, if you print with the format specifier %d, which indicates a integer number, of course your maximum printable number would be INT_MAX. But your example is wrong. You are trying to tell it to print INT_MAX digits on a number, but that, of course, far exceeds the actual numerical value INT_MAX. As to why your example fails, I suppose printf() stores the ...


0

%x specifies in printf is used to print the unsigned integer argument as hexadecimal notation. That's why you see all print 'D'. But only the 4th form is correct. printf("%x\n",(const uint8_t *)0x0D); // undefined behavior, converting integer constant to a pointer printf("%x\n",(const uint8_t)0x0D); // ok, but not necessary printf("%x\n",(uint8_t *)0x0D); ...


1

%x format specifier experts the argument to be of type unsigned int. In your case, printf("%x\n",(const uint8_t)0x0D); printf("%x\n",0x0D); arguments will be promoted (default promotion rule) to match the type, but in case of printf("%x\n",(const uint8_t *)0x0D); //supplying a pointer printf("%x\n",(uint8_t *)0x0D); //supplying a pointer ...


5

printf is not waiting it is getchar instead. getchar uses a buffer behind the scene. When that buffer is empty, getchar will read 1 line from stdin and then return the first caracter. If it is not empty, it will return the next caracter from the buffer immediatly. That means that the getchar will wait the first time you call it. And thus your printf is ...


0

disp probably didn't produce what you want because you need to explicitly convert the numbers to text. You can try: disp(['The minimum value is ' num2str(minY1(2)) ', which occurs at x = ' num2str(minX)]);


2

you are launching nawk for every number in $NUMBERS, very expensive in terms of time. you could filter $NUMBERS with grep to only work on the numbers you are interested in. i.e. grep -f FileWithListOfNumbers FileWithListOfXnumbers >matched_numbers will give you a list of XNUMBERS (in matched_numbers) that are also in NUMBERS


3

The reason your program is slow is not because of printing. Your program is slow because you invoke a new copy of nawk for every element of $NUMBERS. This is very wasteful and you should rethink your program design from the beginning. It appears you are mostly trying to see which numbers from one list exist in a second list. If you want to do this in ...


2

It's not super clear in the documentation, but a % followed by a %, that is %%, is the way to tell sprintf to use a literal %. We can test this fairly easily: sprintf("%% %s %%", "hi") [1] "% hi %" For your query string, this should work: sprintf("SELECT count([X.1]) FROM testes where StartDate like '%% %s 09: %%'", dday) From ?sprintf: The ...


2

Try this: fprintf('The minimum value is %d which occurs at x = %d', minY1(2), minX); %d is used for numbers and %s would be used for strings.


0

#include<stdio.h> int binary(int x) { int y,i,b,a[100]; if(x<16) { if(x%2==1) a[3]=1; if(x/2==1||x/2==3 || x/2==5 || x/2==7) a[2]=1; if(x>4 && x<8) a[1]=1; else if(x>12 && x<16) ...


2

Assign the myFunc return value to y: y = MyFunc(y); And use the format %lf instead of %d.


0

PROBLEM WAS LOCALE as someone pointed out I didnt know what caused error and i thank you. more on this link /bin/bash printf does not work with other LANG than C


0

Try setting your locale environment variable LC_NUMERIC to some locale that uses period. E.g. LC_NUMERIC="C" printf "%0.2f\n" 3.1415 The locale needs to be installed in your system. To get full list of the locales installed, use locale -a


0

You didn't post how is the log actually get printed on the console, make sure you print it with right functions, for example fprintf(stderr, str); Second, you are using a static buffer here, it is subject to in data race when the function is called concurrently, possibly by multiple threads. Obviously the buffer is overwritten for every log, it does not ...


0

This is the answer to your question. void to_binary(int x, char c[]) { int i =0; int j; while(x) { /* The operation results binary in reverse order. * so right-shift the entire array and add new value in left side*/ for(j = i; j > 0; j--) { c[j] = c[j-1]; } c[0] = (x%2) + '0'; ...


0

One of the previous answers has already discussed the issue with c[j] x = x % 2; and the lack of proper character conversion. That being said, I'll instead be pointing out a different issue. Note that this isn't a specific solution to your problem, rather, consider it to be a recommendation. Hard-coding the placement of the null-terminator is not a good ...


0

the problem is in the code below: while (x != 0) { c[j] = x % 2; // origin: c[j] x = x % 2; a typo? j++; } the result of x % 2 is a integer, but you assigned it to a character c[j] —— integer 1 is not equal to character '1'. If you want to convert a integer(0-9) to a character form, for example: integer 7 to character '7', you can do this: int ...


0

Assuming _crt_va_start behaves like standard C va_start, then you need to declare a va_list somewhere, rather than using some uninitialized char pointer. Reason why it seems to work is probably because va lists have non-existent type safety (and therefore using them to begin with is bad practice). Do something like this instead: #include <stdarg.h> ...


0

This is the problem: .data d1: .double # declares zero doubles, since you used an empty list format: .asciz "%lf\n" d1 and format have the same address, since .double with no args assembles to nothing. (".double expects zero or more flonums, separated by commas. It assembles floating point numbers."). So scanf overwrites the format string you use ...


1

There are a couple of issues with this : Firstly, the askit function will not return till you exit the while loop or you return a value. If I understand correctly you wish to print We go on, you say stuff every time the user need to enter a value. Assuming that you have a variable you declared inside the function fun you may do it like below : ...


15

Probably, your system's C library also defines a function strdup, and some code in the program startup calls that function. Then the linker links those calls to your strdup function instead of the system function. To avoid this, don't name your function strdup, or str anything for that matter: names starting str and a lowercase letter are reserved (C11 ...


0

You have an additional space. You can make the loop a little shorter with printf "PASSED TESTS: ($passed_tests)\n\n" for i in "${passed_tests_arr[@]}" do # Not needed: printf "✓ " i=${i%.*} # Not needed: i=${i#*/ } echo "${i/ *\// }" done


1

The code is correct except for a blank in the script in line 6. printf "PASSED TESTS: ($passed_tests)\n\n" for i in "${passed_tests_arr[@]}" do printf "✓ " i=${i%.*} i=${i#*/ } echo "$i" done Without the blank the code is: printf "PASSED TESTS: ($passed_tests)\n\n" for i in "${passed_tests_arr[@]}" do printf "✓ " i=${i%.*} ...


1

The d in %5d signals, that you want to print a decimal number. The 5 in that expression says, that the number should have the length of 5 digits, if the number is shorter, it pads the number with blanks. If you want to print a string, use %s instead of %5d.


1

Just for reference! Generally prefer cout and cin to printf in C++. Also, you don't need to worry about std::string here - just read directly to the struct. #include <iostream> #include <cstring> struct DATE { int Year; int Month; int Date; }; struct Book { char Name [50]; char Author [50]; }; int main() { Book ...


1

You define bookName and bookAuthor as a single letter, a char. By using: cin >> bookName; You read only one character, the rest of the line are still in buffer and will be read by next input operation. You should define those variables with type std::string, which is defined in string header (#include <string>). struct Book { string ...


4

char means one single character. bookName is a single character. cin >> bookName; stores the first character you type, and only that first character. Then strcpy_s(book1.name, &bookName); causes undefined behaviour because the last argument is supposed to point to a string, but you supplied pointer to a single character instead. Also you used ...


0

As mentioned by Mark Plotnick, a workaround for Linux systems is: system("echo DEBUG MSG >> filename"); It's not pretty but it's quick, copy/pasteable, and easy to use for this situation because it can also write to /dev/kmsg: system("echo DEBUG MSG >> /dev/kmsg"); which allows it to behave like a printk. Of course, it's not a safe solution ...


1

Potential problem with fprintf(f, "DEBUG MSG\n"); I assume "DEBUG MSG\n" is some placeholder for the true message. Should the true message contain a '%', then the function will look for missing arguments. Use fputs() - its can be lighter on the CPU too than fprintf(). fputs(debug_message, f); The true message may lack a '\n' and then get stuck in ...


3

Functions. Extra chars for my shortest answer.


1

To use the value/ what the pointer is pointed to, I do *ret. Yes this is useful if code needs to use that value, a single character only. But code wants to print the contents of a string. A string is a sequence (or array) of characters up to and including the null character. Why don't we use *ret to get ".tutorialspoint.com" since the string is ...


0

"since the string is the value in ret, which is accessed by *ret" No. A string in C is a number of chars ending with \0. So *ret will point to the first char of the many. There is no unitary value of a String as e.g. in Java. * is the dereference operator.*ret will give the . since you use * to access the pointed element. The %s-printf format uses a ...


2

Have a look at the %s conversion specifier properties. When used in printf(), it expects an argument of type char * and so it gets. All is well. To quote C11 standard, chapter §7.21.6.1 s If no l length modifier is present, the argument shall be a pointer to the initial element of an array of character type.280) Characters from the array are written ...



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